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Vol. 5 No. 16 
Thursday, January 4, 1973 



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Mayor Hannon 9 $ Mid-Term Recommendations 

• No Changes In Assessments 

• Municipal Spending Cuts 
•More Open Space Acquisition 
•Cultural Development Program 

By DICK MATTULINA 

Mayor Walter J. Hannon pledged Tuesday night that there will be no changes in 

residential property assessments in 1973. 

She is the first woman to hold 
that job. 




MAYOR WALTER J. HANNON 



In his mid-term address, 
delivered in the City Council 
Chamber the Mayor reaffirmed 
his opposition to 100 percent 
valuation and called the city's 
present assessment system "full, 
fair and accurate." 

Hannon outlined plans for 
1973 including: 

•• A four-point program 
reduce municipal spending. 

•■ A commitment 
acquisition of open space. 

• A "Spring Offensive" 
clean up the city. 

• Establishment of 



to 



to 



to 



an 



Zoning Study 



H istoric 

Committee. 

"* • A city-wide cultural 

development program. 

Arthur H. Tobin was 
re-elected City Council 
president, becoming the first 
man in Quincy's history to 
receive four consecutive 
one-year terms. 

Mrs. Josephine Carnali was 
re-elected clerk of council 
committees for her fourth term. 



The mayor asked that 
taxpayers' suits for 100 fcercent 
revaluation be dropped 
the system "can mean disaster 
for our community. 

FULL TEXT OF 
MAYOR'S ADDRESS 
ON PAGE 13 

"Court-ordered revaluation 
will automatically increase the 
tax burden of the homeowner 
by shifting a greater share of 
taxes from the business and 
industrial community to 
residential property owners," he 
said. 

The elderly, veterans and 
widows would suffer most in 
lost abatements, he said, but "all 
homeowners and rent payers will 
be hurt." 

In an effort to reduce 
municipal spending, Hannon said 



he will require department heads 
to "roll back general expenses 
and capital costs requests to 
1970 levels." 

ma j The $1.4 million anticipated 
federal revenue sharing fundsrfor 
1973 will also "be applied 
directly towards keeping the tax 
rate down," he said. 

He said he will initiate an 
analysis of license fees and 
pledged to work for corrective 
legislation regarding taxation of 
new developments. 

Hannon said these measures 
will add to a belt-tightening 
campaign begun in September 
including: 

• E 1 i m i n.a t i o n of 

non-emergency overtime. 

• Establishment of a Citizens 
Capital Improvements 
Committee. 

• Establishment of a Citizens 
School Building Needs 
Committee. 

• Establishment of a city 
budget director. 

(Cont'd on Page 3] 



Tobin To Get 
Major Senate Post 







Senatoj^JLlfflur H. Tobin 
[D-Qu4£Cj4 reportedly will be 
named vice-chairman of the 
senate's powerful Ways and 
Means Committee. 

State House sources say that 
the appointment by Senate 
President Kevin Harrington will 
be made shortly. 

Tobin, who is 42, will 
succeed Frank McCann 
[D-Cambridge] as vice-chairman 
of what is the most powerful 
committee in the Senate, and by 
doing so will assume a major role 
in party and Senate leadership. 

McCann will become 
chairman of the new Post Audit 
and Oversight Committee which 
will serve as the Senate 
watchdog on spending. 

Tobin will be a member of 
that committee also. 

The Quincy Democrat has 
been in the Senate only 18 
months, succeeding James R. 
Mclntyre who resigned to 



become Senate counsel. 

Mclntyre had moved up to 
Majority Whip in -the Semite 
before resigning. 

State House sources believe 
that Tobin will follow in 
Mclntyre's footsteps and also 
become Majority Whip. 

Tobin, who is chairman of 
the Quincy Democratic 
Committee, Tuesday night was 
re-elected president of the City 
Council for his fourth one-year 
term. 

And, according to the State 
House sources, Harrington 
tapped Tobin for his new 
committee post because he was 
impressed by his leadership of 
the council and because of his 
work with the Democratic party 
in Quincy. 

Harrington, they 'said, was 
looking for a "young, energetic 
Democrat with experience in 
local government and with 
leadership qualities." 



Quincy Census To Start 
In February Or March 



The book that lists the 
residents of Quincy of voting age 
is going to be a lot thicker this 
year. 

Now that the voting age has 
been lowered from 21 to 1 8 the 
book will list all residents over 
the age of 17. 

Census takers will start 



making their rounds sometime in 
February or March, the City 
Clerk's office said this week. 

And don't call it the "police 
listings" anymore. 

The count has been taken by 
Quincy citizens hired especially 
for the job for the past three 
years. » 



Christine Simpson, David Kaplan 
Quincy's Prince, Princess 



MOURNERS - Former Mayor James R. Mclntyre, Congressman James A. Burke and format House 
Speaker John W. McCormack in Adams Family paw solemnly participate in memorial ecumenical 
ear vices for forma r President Harry S. Truman at United First Parish Church, Quincy's famad "Church of 
the Presidents". See Story, other photos Page 2 



Christine Simpson, 9, of 17 
Townsend Ave., Braintree, and 
David Kaplan, 1 1, of Charles St., 
Quincy, are the Princess and 
Prince of the Christmas Festival 
program of the Quincy Center 
Business and Professional 
Association. 

Announcement of the 
winners was made by Joseph 
Whiteman, chairman of the 
event. 



They'll be off for Florida any 
weekend after April 1 5 for three 
days and two nights at 
Disneyworld, accompanied by a 
parent, as guests of the 
Association membership. 

Their names were drawn from 
a barrel containing 35,000 
coupons filled out by shoppers 
and deposited with Quincy 
Center merchants during the 
Christmas season. 



Page 2 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 4, 1973 



^1^ m 



Quincy Remembers Harry Truman 



Published weekly on Thursday by 
The Quincy San Publishing Company 
1601 Hancock Stmt, Qutacy, Mataacaesettt 02149 
Publisher and Editos 
Henry W. Bosworth, Jr. 
lOt 4 Per Copy $3.50 Per Yew 

Out of State $4 JO Per Year 
Telephone 471-3100 471-3101 

Second Oau Poscar Md •» Boston, Mats. 
MEMBER NEW ENGLAND PRESS ASSOCIATION 



Th« Quincy Sua 
me>o«aMUtv tec typographical man aa 
MM wtti reprint that part of ma 
Us which Um 



I_l 



Trailside Museum To 
Recycle Christmas Trees 



; . • . 

The filue! -IHlls Trailside 
Museum announces plans to 
accept Christmas trees for 
recycling. 

A special area has been 
reserved at the museum to 
deposit trees. 

Museum Director Robert 
Stanhope, said the trees will 
have the"ir boughs removed and 
they Vfll be tfse'd to construct a 
new d'eef *-'bfrnd on the 
reservation. The main trunks will 
be reduced to wood chips that 
will be utilized during the spring 
planting season. 

Trees should have all 
decorations and. tinsel removed 
and should be taken to the 
Trailside Museum on Canton- 
Ave. in Milton, adjacent to the 



MDCski slope. A member of the 
museum staff will assist people 
with their trees. 

The recycling will not only 
assist the museum staff in the 
construction of a much needed 
deer blind, but will also 
eliminate the need to cut living 
evergreens for the construction. 

The Trailside Museum will 
also be participating in "Museum 
Goers Month'' ' during January". 
Visitors will receive a free pass 
good for free admission at any 
one of these locations: The New 
England Aquarium, The Museum 
of Fine Arts, The Children's 
Museum, The Museum of 
Transportation, The China Trade 
Museum, The Museum of 
Science and Drumlin Farm. 



John Provost Joins Survival Staff 



Survival announces that John 
C. Provost has joined the staff of 
thfe;Qumcy + based youth service 
program. 

He attended Survival's 
Redirection Residence where he 
received his training from 
January 1972 until November 
1972. 



Provost willbe in charge of 
courts, probation and prison 
programs "at Survival. If any 
South Shore resident is having 
drug difficulties which have 
resulted in legal involvement, 
they are urged to contact him at 
471-7100. 



BARKER'S 






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• Storage Files 

• 73 Dated Diaries 

• Receipt Books 

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* 472-2122 

ONE MAPLE STREET 
QUINCY SQUARE 




ENTERING First Parish Church to participate in ecumenical memorial service for former President 
Harry S. Truman are Congressman James Burke, former House Speaker John McCormack, Henry 
Nicholson, Truman's favorite secret service man for 6 1/2 years, and Mayor Walter Hannon. It was from 
these steps that President Truman spoke to the oeople of Quincy on his visit in 1948. 




IN MEMORIAM - A layman and clergymen of three faiths took part in the memorial services for 
President Harry S. Truman at United First Parish Church. From the left, City Council President and 
Senator Arthur H. Tobin; Rabbi David Jacobs of Temple Beth-El; Rev. Robert H. Blute of St. Ann's 
Church; and Rev. John R. Graham of the United First Parish Church. 

[Quincy Sun Photo] 



By PAUL HAROLD 

Quincy paused last week to 
remember President Harry S. 
Truman with an ecumenical 
memorial service at First Parish 
Church, the Church of the 
Presidents from where Truman 
spoke to the people of Quincy in 
1 948 on a campaign stop. 

The ecumenical service began 
with an organ prelude by Mrs. 
Gale Harrison. Rabbi David 
Jacobs of Temple Beth-El gave a 
reading, followed by an eloquent 
tribute by Rev. John Graham, 
minister of the First Parish 
Church. Rev. Robert Blute of St. 
Ann's Church read a memorial 
prayer and led the congregation 
in a recitation of the Lord's 
Prayer. 

Senator Arthur Tobin gave 
the "in memoriam", comparing 
President Truman to Quincy 
born President John Adams, 
who is entombed in the crypt 
below the church. 

In his bid for re-election, 
President Truman made a 
campaign swing through Quincy, 
Oct. 28, 1948, on his way from 
Boston to Brockton. 

His motorcade crossed the 
Neponset Bridge around 7:20" 
a.m. and proceeded up Hancock 



Speakei 



F o ur South Shore 
businessmen will* give their 
predictions for the area's 
economy in 1973 at a "Forecast 
, 73" meeting of the South 



St. to the steps of First Parish 
Church. 

Despite the earliness of the 
hour an estimated 7,000 people 
gathered in the square to hear 
the President. 

On the speaker's stand with 
Truman were: Mayor Charles 
Ross; William Flynn, chairman 
of the Democratic City 
Committee; Paul Dever, 
Democratic nominee for 
Governor; Charles Sullivan, 
nominee for Lieutenant 
Governor; Francis Kelley, 
nominee for Attorney General; 
David Concannon, nominee for 
Congress accompanied by his 
seven year old daughter Kateri 
and Secretary of Labor Maurice 
Tobin. 

Truman spoke for only about 
five minutes, elaborating on 
what he considered the main 
issues of the campaign, checking 
Communism and finding peace. 

Mayor Ross presented him 
with a copy of the book, "300 
Years of Quincy", as a souvenir. 
The Mayor then introduced 
Truman to his wife, as well as 
Mrs. Mary Shipsley, Quincy 
Democratic State 
Committeewoman, Timothy 
Daly and James Daly, first 
cousin to Maurice Tobin. 

Before he left; the President 
toured the First Parish Church 



Shore Chamber of Commerce. 

The meeting will be held at 
7:44 a.m. Jan. 10 at the 
Sheraton-Tara in Braintree. 

Speakers will include Charles 



and the crypts to see the tombs 
of Presidents John and John 
Quincy Adams. He was escorted 
by late city historian William C. 
Edwards and his son William, Jr. 

The President's motorcade, 
made up of nine cars, then made 
its way down Quincy Ave. to 
Weymouth Landing. Preceeding 
it were four state police 
motorcycles, four Quincy police 
motorcycles, two cars of secret 
servicemen and two buses of 
reporters. 

Mrs. Truman and Margaret 
had originally planned to visit* 
Quincy with the President, but 
had to cancel because of a, 
change in schedule. 

Truman's visit coincided with 
a similar visit made by Franklin 
Delano Roosevelt 12 years 
earlier in 1 936. 

Despite Truman's last minute 
visit, the Quincy voters went to 
the polls the next week to give 
Dewey a plurality. 

Truman's visit made him the 
sixth President to visit Quincy. 
James Monroe came in 1817 to 
meet with John Adams. 
Theodore Roosevelt was here 
around the turn of the century; 
William Howard Taft in 1912; 
Calvin Coolidge in 1919. 
Franklin Roosevelt stopped in 
Quincy on two occasions, once 
on June 19, 1933 and again on 
October 21, 1935. 



A. Pearce, Quincy Savings Bank; 
John N. Dwyer, State Street 
South; William J. Lamborghini, 
Weymouthport Corp., and Ralph 
D. Tedeschi, Angelo's. 




'The 



Did V$ Proud' 



Thursday, January 4, 1973 Quincy Sun Page 3 



Quincy High Band Returns To Warm Reception 



By TOM HENSHAW 

Trie Quincy High School 
band was due back home 
Wednesday after an eventful five 
days in Dallas, Texas, during 
which it got national exposure 
on television in the New Year's 
Day Cotton Bowl parade. 

But a special surprise was 
reserved for the final day for the 
returning ambassadors of good 
will. 

The rival North Quincy High 
School band, which goes to 
Dublin, Ireland, for the St. 
Patrick's Day parade next 
March, was scheduled to 
serenade them as they debarked 
from their plane at 2:08 p.m. in 
Logan Airport. 

And, for the first time in the 
memory of an old inhabitant, 
possibly for the first time since 
the schools split in the early 
1930-'s, the North Quincy band 
was planning to play the Quincy 
High marching song. 

The reception by the North 
band was arranged by School 
Supt. Dr. Lawrence Creedon. 

Plans for the reception at 
Logan went like this: 

Four buses were to leave 
North Quincy High around 1 
p.m. with the members of the 
North band. They were to be 
escorted by State Police onto 
the airport apron and march out 
to the plane for the greeting. 

Two buses were to depart 
from Quincy High about 1 p.m. 
with 24 Quincy High 
cheerleaders and as many 
parents of band members as 
wanted to make the reception. 

Members of the City Council 
and the School Committee were 
invited to take part in the 
reception, which was to be video 
taped by the school's library 
services department. 



The Quincy band also was 
presented with a resolution, 
introduced into the City Council 
Tuesday night by Council 
President Arthur H. Tobin, 
commending the band for the 
honors it brought to the City of 
Quincy. 

"The commentator on 
television mentioned that the 
Quincy band came the farthest 
of any band in the parade," said 
Tobin. "He told a little story 
about it. It made us feel pretty 
good. The kids did us proud." 

Tobin's office as state senator 
helped to arrange the reception 
at Logan Airport in which the 
North Quincy band was 
permitted to greet the returning 
Quincy kids at the plane. 

Meanwhile, members of the 
Quincy band were savoring the 
events of the past five days. 

They attended a New Year's 
Eve dance, sponsored by the 
Cotton Bowl Council for 
members of all bands in the 
parade, which was also attended 
by actor William Conrad [he's 
Cannon in the TV show of the 
same name). 

During their free time, some 
of the band members visited the 
famed Nieman Marcus 
Department Store in Dallas and 
a real frontier lodeo in nearby 
Fort Worth. 

But the most heartwarming 
event was entirely unplanned. 

One of the band members 
suffered an attack of asthma and 
was taken to a nearby nursing 
home for medication. 

The hospitality at the home 
was such that the band went 
back that night [Fridayl for an 
impromptu serenade of the 
nursing home's residents, almost 
ill of them over 80 years old. 

Like Councillor Tobin said. 

The kids did us proud. 




AWARD •• Quincy Police Chief Francis X. Finn [third from left] receives a National Foundation award 
from Andrew Veneto of 85 Stedman St., West Quincy, 1973 Quincy March of Dimes chairman. In 1972 
the police department collected more than $400 to aid the March of Dimes in combating birth defects. 
Looking on are Mayor Walter J. Hannon and Police Lt. Arthur Shea, who supervised distribution of coin 
canisters throughout the city. The Police Department will again be placing canisters in local businesses in 
January, 1973. 

No Changes In Residential Assessments In 1973 

[Cont'd from Page 1 1 



Now They Know It In Texas, Too 



If you think you noticed 
something different on the 
banner that was carried by 
the Quincy High School band 
on TV in the Cotton Bowl 
Parade, you're right. There 
was. 

To the old wording, "City 
of Presidents" was added 
"Quincy, Mass." 

"We never had to worry 
about such identification 
before," said a school 
department spokesman. 



"Everybody around here 
knows it's Quincy. But they 
don't in Texas." 

Or in Ireland, either. 

The North Quincy High 
School band will take a 
similar banner [in red and 
black instead of blue and 
white) to Dublin when it 
marches in the St. Patrick's 
Day parade next March. 

What is it they say .... 

Tomorrow the world! 



• Negotiation of a two-year 
union contract. 

Recreation goals for the year 
include acquisition of Squaw 
Rock, and beach areas in 
Germantown and Quincy Point 
and improvements to Faxon 
Park. 

The proposed Historic Zoning 
Study Committee would be 
geared toward insuring "the 
long-term preservation of our 
city's architectural and historic 
assets," he said. 

The mayor promised to 



support efforts in the fights 
against alcoholism and drug 
abuse centered in Quincy 
Hospital's Faxon House and the 
office of drug coordinator John 
Mahoney. 

He said he "would like to see 

the City of Quincy develop more 
in the way of cultural activities, 
especially during the spring and 
summer months. 

"My office is going to begin 
to examine this approach and we 
hope a program wHl come from 
it that Quincy citizens can 



enjoy," he said. 

Hannon said "the problems 
that Quincy will face in the next 
several years are bound to be 
complex, but they can be solved 
if there is an inherent sense of 
honesty." 



"Facts must be faced and 
decisions courageously made, 
based on what is good for the 
people and what is best in the 
long run for the welfare of our 
City," he said. 



Free Courses In Federal Income Tax Returns 




=?S 



FOR 



RCAMOTOROLA SYLVAMA 
ZFNITH ADMIRAL WHIRLPOOL 

WESTINCIIOUSF. 
Call 479-1350 



The Internal Revenue Service 
is sponsoring free courses in the 
preparation of federal income 
tax returns in its VITA program 
at Quincy High School. 

The classes will be held at the 
school Jan. 8, 10, 15 and 17 
from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. 

Persons interested in 
attending are asked to call 
Boston 223-3446 for registration 
information. 



The Volunteer Income Tax 
Assistance program, or VITA, is 
designed for volunteers to assist 
f r^e-of-charge the 
underprivileged and the elderly 
prepare income tax returns. 

"We want to help" is the 
Internal Revenue Service's 
theme this year and the purpose 
of the course is to have 
community : minded groups and 



persons learn how to correct^ 
complete returns and help their 
neighbors. 

Currently over. 1,300 have: 
signed up for' this program 
throughout Massachusetts and 
they include members of 
community action groups, 
retirement organizations, college 
and universities and religious and 
governmental organizations. 



FACTORY" sIrVIcF * QK Accepting A PP licationt For s P rin s Semetter 




Quincy Junior College is 
accepting applications for the 
Spring semester which will begin 
Feb. 5, 1973. 

Applications may be obtained 
from the Admissions Office or 
requested by telephone. 
Completed application forms 
and high school transcripts must 
be received at the Admissions 
Office before an applicant can 
be considered for admission. 

The college is also accepting 



up to 30 credit hours for courses 
taken through the U.S. Armed 
Forces Institute [USAFIJ or by 
subject examinations 
administered by the College 
Level Examination Program 
[CLEP1 of the College Entrance 
Examination Board in Princeton, 
N.Jfc Under these programs, 
students and non-students could 
possibly complete work for an 
Associate Degree in one year. 
The day college registration 



will be held JarC 29, 30, 31 and 
Feb. 1 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. For 
further information, please 
contact the Admissions Office at 
471-2470. 



The Public Is Invited To Attend 
The Next Budget Meeting Of 

The Quincy School Committee 
To Be Held At 7 P.M.Thursday, 
January 4, 1973 



Lawrence P. Creecton, Secretary 
Quincy School Committee 




Ojljwgt ROOF.- 

MOVIM ISCAM OUHNHI 
POt MUTIMO MI W O W , 




III lllcTtlc 

gutter cables 

Granite City 
Hardware 

1617 Hancock. St., 
Quincy Center 






Page 4 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 4, 1973 

» ■ ■ha m i . •■' , -i j -'T »_*_ 




.... .. . . r , 



^4 



By PAUL HAROLD 

Quincy residents watching the' Cotton Bowl Parade on TV New 
Year's Day were a bit surprised at first to hear the Quincy 
contingent referred to as the "Golden Eagles". 
» It was no mistake though. The commentator was referring to the 
all-girl color guard from Quincy, 111., which was marching a short 
distance ahead of our Quincy "Presidents". 

Incidentally, the Q.H.S. band travelled the fartherest of all the 
bands participating in the Dallas parade, and seemed to get more TV 
time than any other band. Certainly good advertising for Quincy. 

* ** 

AND SPEAKING of Quincy, III., it's among the 17 communities 
in the United States with the name Quincy. The others are located in 
the state of: California, Florida, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, 
Michigan, Missouri, Mississippi, New Hampshire, Ohio, Oregon, 
Pennsylvania, Washington, West Virginia and Wisconsin. Most of 
them were named after John Quincy Adams, but pronounced 
"Quin-cee" instead of "Quin-zee". 

* * • 

THE TRIBUTE was for Harry Truman, but the center of 
attraction at the memorial service at Quincy's First Parish Church 
last week was former House Speaker John McCormack. 

Sitting next to McCormack was Congressman James Burke, 
former Mayor James Mclntyre and Mayor Walter Hannon. 
Appropriately enough they sat in pew number 54, the Adams family 

HER NAME has been Mrs. Harold Davis for the last eight months, 
but people still call her Bobby Kay Smith. 

Some of her students at Sacred Heart School in North Quincy 
realizing that she's married call her Mrs. Smith. 
. She . can't seem to shake the name Smith. And when school 
committeeman Harold Davis and his wife moved- to. their new 
apartment at Presidential Estates last month, they found the name 
above theirs on the mailbox - SMITH. 

*** 

H. HOBART HOLLY, President of the Quincy Historical Society, 
reports that the society has gained 100 new members since last year, 
bringing the total membership to about 450. 

There are two reasons for the surge in membership. One is the 
recent acquisition of the Adams Academy property. The other is the 
work done by First Vice President, William O'Connell. 

Former Executive Vice President of the South Shore Chamber of 
Commerce, O'Connell, an antique collector and historian in his own 
right, "has been on the phone for the last couple of months 
drumming up interest and support (and members] for the society. 

•""•; **'*' 

THE ANNUAL banquet for eastern Massachusetts champions of 
American Legion Baseball was held at the Morrisette Post last week 
and featured quite a line up of speakers: Quincy's Sam Mele of the 
Red Sox; Frank Malzone of the Red Sox; Wilbur Wood of the White 
Sox; Tom O'Connell, coach at Brandeis; Ed Pellagrini, coach at 
Boston College; Richard Koch, executive secretary of the park and 
recreation board; Mayor Walter Hannon and Ray Cattaneo, 
nvironmental specialist for the Quincy park department. 

Cattaneo by the way is a former player for the old Boston Braves. 

* * * 

SMALL WORLD DEPT: Rt.^ev. Richard .HawJco, : P astor of 
Sacred Heart* Church North Quincy, served iti the' A'rmy Reserve 
with General Sumner Kaplan, the new commander of the unit 
stationed at Merrymount Park. 

And the pastor had another title besides chaplain: colonel. 

*** 
WE CAN EXPECT a visit from Senator Kennedy within a couple 
of weeks. He will be on the South Shore and a swing through Quincy 
is already being worked out. 

*** 
, BUMPER STICKER WATCHERS report having spotted the first 
sticker for 1974 in Quincy Center M.B.T.A. parking lot last week, a 
red, white and blue sticker reading "Quinn '74". 

It's not for Councillor John Quinn, but rather Attorney Genera' 
Robert Quinn, unannounced candidate for Governor. , 

*** 

HATS OFF to Herbert, Blake, supervised of city buildings, for the 
'ecentlylcompleted renovations to the City Council Chamber. The 
chamber looks better than it ever has. Last time the chamber was 
spruced up was in 1960 through a resolve by Councillor William 
Ellis, now, its completely renovated. 

** + 

FRANK MORAN of Houghs Neck recently completed work as 
chairman of the neighborhood campaign for the United Fund. He 
was also recently named by Governor Sargent as a Notary Public. 

Sargent recently appointed' another Quincy resident as Notary, 
Carmine Prioli of East Elm Ave., Wollaston. A denial technician for 
the Veterans Administration in Boston, he is also known foi having 
served as Chief Marshal for the Evacuation Day-St. Patrick's Day 
parade in South Boston. j*. 

* ** 

HISTORICAL SIDELIGHT: When President Truman visited 
Quincy in 1948 he was welcomed by Mayor Charles Ross. After the 
speeches were ended the Mayor was surprised to learn that the 
President had been accompanied by his name sake. Truman's press 
secretary came up to the Mayor and said, "Charlie Ross, meet 
Charlie Ross." 




Jack Anderson 

1972 Pulitzer Prise Winner for National Reporting, and 
Syndicated Columnist for The Quincy Sun 

• Burt Lancaster And Aspirin 

% U.S. To Pay Kennedy Center Bill 

• Nixon, Kissinger Keep Tight Rein 



WASHINGTON -The Su- 
preme Court may soon issue a 
ruling that could revolutionize 
public service advert ising on 
television and radio. 

In the past, public service 
ads rarely have gone beyond 
the rumblings of Smokey the 
Hear or the antipollution 
appeals ot Wrx»dsy the Owl 

But the days of the soft -sell 
in public service ad? may be 
numbered For 14 months 
environmental and consumer 
activists have been pressuring 
TV qnd radio stations around 
the country to run tougher ads 
in the public interest. 
Many ads have actually been 
prepared but rejected by TV 
and radio stations. One ad 
prepared a vear ago had the 
new Billy Graham advis- 
ing consumers ■ hot' to buy 
phosphate detergents. A- 
nother more recent ad has 
actor Burt Lancaster hurling 
broadsides at the- drug in- 
dustry. 

In his ad. Lancaster takes 
several drug companies to 
task for peddling aspirin that 
is unrecommended and over- 
priced- I^ancaster advises 
oluriliy "Next time you get a 
headache, use your head and 
buy the cheapest aspirin you 
can find." 

Station managers are under 
slandably reluctant to run 
such ads free of charge. But 
even when consumer activists 
have offered to pay to get the 
ads on the air, the men behind 
the media have turned thumbs 
down. 

The Supreme Court, how- 
ever, may compel the stations 
to tun the ads. Before the 
Court are basically two ques- 
tions. Does the first amend- 
ment apply to broadcasters 
and. if so. does it allow broad- 
casters to ban controversial 
ads? 

Indications arc that the court 
will rule in favor of the con- 
sumer groups. If so. we may 
all soon be seeing Burt Lan- 
caster giving the drug indus 
trv headaches 

' - Footing the Bill 

The Kennedy Center tor the 
Performing Arts has discover 
eif a unique way to handle its 
enormous const ruction cost 
overruns. 

Kennedy Center executive 
board members, who for 
months had been frantically 



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SUPPLY CO. 

217 Samoset Avenue, 

Quincy, 472-7200 

Corner of Sea Street, 
Next to Samoset Pharmacy 





searching for funds to pay the 
centers debts, finally arrang- 
ed last fall for the center to be 
made a United States agency 

A confidential memo of a 
recent board meeting outlines 
the details. The memo states. 
'The Department of Justice 
has now determined that the 
(Kennedy! Center is a United 
States agency 

This means, according to 
the memo, that the Justice 
Department will now "deal 
with the matter of unpaid 
construction cost." and delay 
damage claims from the 
general contractor... and some 
24 subcontractors." The memo 
adds: "Unpaid construction 
costs and damage claims total 
about $4.5 million." 

The official memorandum 
also describes the reaction of 
the Kennedy Center trustees. 
The trustees, says the memo, 
"were in a high state of elation 
when they heard the news." 

Small wonder. Not only will 
the Justice Department settle 
the $4.5 million construction 
debt, but the U.S. Park 
Service will shell out another 
S2 million to pay for main- 
tenance and other operating 
costs. 

The Kennedy Center may be 
for the arts, but there is 
nothing refined about the price 
tag. 

— Down on Henry - 

Chinese Premier Chou Kn-lai 
apparently has changed his 
mind about Henry Kissinger. 
In the past. Chou has praised 
Kissinger to visitors for his 
role in negotiating the detente 
between Washington and Pe- 
king. But recent visitors have 
reported' that Chou is dis- 
appointed in Kissinger over 
his handling of the Vietnam 
truce. This could hurl Chinese- 
American relations. 

Meanwhile, in Washington. 
President Nixon and Henry 
Kissinger are keeping such 
tight rein on the Vietnam 
truce negotiations that the top 
State Department experts 
don't know for sure what's 
going on. The more they learn 
however, tho inore appalled 
they are. One top expert told 
us that Kissinger tried to 
handle too much by himself 
without the strong support he 
should have requested from 
the State Department. With 
the proper back-up. they say. 
he could have avoided the 



imprecise language that has 
led to a breakdown in the 
talks. 

As for the impact of the 
bombing on the North Viet- 
namese, intelligence reports 
claim that Hanoi correctly 
anticipated that President 
Nixon would renew the bomb- 
ing of Hanoi. As early as 
December 4, according to the 
intelligence reports, they 
smarted evacuating school 
children from Hanoi. 
—Around the U.S.— 

U.S.MEDICAL CRISIS- 
Medical bills have been sky- 
rocketing so high that the 
public is demanding action. 
We have received complaints 
from middle-class working 
people, who have spent their 
whole lives saving up a small 
retirement nest-egg only to 
have their entire savings 
wiped out by a 60-minute 
operation by a high-priced doc- 
tor. We have heard from citi- 
zens in remote areas out West 
as well as minority groups in 
the inner cities. All complain 
that they are cut off from 
adequate medical service. 
President Nixon, we've learn- 
ed, will soon propose the 
establishment of a paramedi- 
cal corps to provide emergency 
help to ghettos and remote 
communities. 

BUCKLEY FACINO AXE- 
William Buckley's popular TV 
show Firing Line has only one 
chance in 10 of returning to 

Fiuhlic television next fall. 
Buckley got the word per- 
sonally from his friend Henry 
Loomis. chairman of the Cor- 
poration of Public Broadcast- 
ing, last week. According to a 
recent survey, jnore than a 
hundred program directors of 
educational' stations around 
the country rate Buckley's 
show "essential" to their pro- 
graming. But Buckley, out ot 
favor in the White House, is 
considered "too much a per- 
sonality.'" according to Re- 
publicans who control CPB 
purse strings. 

UNPUNISHED POLICE 
M E N - A spot check of police 
brutality cases at the Justice 
Department reveals what 
could be a disturbing trend. 
Over the last year, the FBI 
has referred more than 200 
cases to the Justice Depart- 
ment, but the Justice Depart- 
ment informs us it has suc- 
cessfully prosecuted less than 
a'half dozen of these cases. 



money by building a Quincy 
* Sun noma delivery route. 
: 471*3100 






• Youth Speaks Out 

• It was ironic that last week the U.S. was sending money to help 
build up a devastated Nicaragua and sending bombs on the other side 
of the. world to devastate another country. 

• Bobby Orr announced his engagement with a mild furor, but when 
Derek Sanderson and Mark Spitz go, we can expect mass suicides. 

•A bumper sticker commenting on the plight of the United States - 
"Don't blame me; I'm from Massachusetts". 



• There is a new Mass. law which makes it illegal to run your car 
engine for more than five minutes while parked. Obviously these 
law-makers have never been on the expressway at 5 p.m. 



• William F. Buckley admitted recently that he went outside the 
3-mile limit of the U.S. and tried some marijuana, but that it did 
nothing for him. Aftet recent statements he made about our 
bombing policy, it is evident that Mr. Buckley's brain was foggy to 
begin with. 

•The pig population in America must be at an all-time low. Most of 
their relatives (pigskins] were seen flying through the air over last 
weekend in the bowl games. 

QHS Journalism Class 



»— iiwi Diiiti 



<mi mm 



"»» 



Thursday, January 4, 1973 Quincy Sun Page 5 



\ 



•Letter Box 

Disagrees With Fellow QCA 
Members On Revaluation 



Editor, Quincy Sun: 

I would like to comment on a 
news article which appeared in 
the local news media on 
December 22, 1972 and entitled 
"QCA Statement Backs Mayors 
Tax Program". 

As a current paid up member 
of the QCA (Quincy Citizens 
Association] I have backed this 
organization on many issues. 
However, I am also a member of 
the QTR and I have to disagree 
with the QCA statement that 
100 per cent revaluation would 
have a disastrous effect on small 
homeowners, particularly the 
elderly and veterans. I believe 
this statement is false and I 
believe no more than 10% of the 
small homeowners particularly 
the elderly and veterans of this 
city would be hurt by 100% 
revaluation - if at all. 

I also believe that I could go 
almost anywhere in this city, 
pick out at random, some 
taxpayers and prove that these 
people have extra income 
coming in from sources other 
than normal weekly pay checks! 

All those politicians who 
keep "pushing" the phrase 
people on fixed incomes are hurt 
by this and by that. When you 
really think about it - 
everybody is on a fixed income 
- in a sense. 

As for sending (railroading] 
over assessed taxpayers to the 
State Appellate Tax Board to get 
relief I think these people are 
wasting their time going to the 
board, considering that it usually 



takes up to 2 or 3 years before 
your case is heard. Also if you 
do not have a lawyer present 
wita you to argue your case for 
you, then you could legally be 
"twisted to bits". 

I personally know of an 
individuals case about VA years 
ago, whereby his 4-family 
Quincy home was slightly gutted 
by fire and was in the process of 
being renovated when his 
assessment was doubled. He 
went to the State Tax Board 
with a lawyer whom he had 
already paid hundreds of dollars 
in legal fees and he lost. 

The QTR [Quincy Taxpayers 
Revolt) because of their 
honesty, charisma, fortitude, 
endurance, highly developed 
organization and having one of 
V: ■ finest legal minds in the state 
representing them, have shown 
that they are being accepted by 
over 51% of the citizens of 
Quincy and are rapidly 
becoming a new "Voice of the 
People*."— 

I hope to see more and more 
taxpayers attending our public 
meetings in the months ahead 
and also proudly display our 
new bumper stickers on their car 
bumpers for all to see. 

I would like to close by 
saying that the QTR was born 
out of the pain of despair for 
honest government and a quest 
for equality in taxes and justice 
for all the citizens of Quincy. 

Ron Halter - Coordinator 
Quincy Taxpayers Revolt 



[QTR1 

A 'Thank You 9 From Senior 
Citizens Activities Director 



Editor, Quincy Sun: 

We would like to take this 
opportunity to express our 
sincere appreciation to you and 
members of your staff for the 
publicity you have given our 
Quincy Senior Citizen Activities 
during the past year. 

I'm sure that the publicity 



played a most important part, in 

the success of the various 

programs that were enjoyed by 

more than 6,500 senior citizens 

during the past twelve months. 

Thank you once again and we 

wish you all a very healthy, 

happy and successful year ahead. 

Marion Andres, Director 

Senior Citizens Activities 



^Question Of The Week 

'WHY GREAT AND 
GENERAL COURT?' 



Why is the state legislature of 
Massachusetts called 'The Great 
and General Court"? This 
question came to the League of 
Women Voters' Voter 
Information Phone from a caller 
who was confused about the 
rather elaborate title of the 
Massachusetts' House and 
Senate. 

Voter Information Phone 
staffers looked into the question 
and found that the title came 
directly from colonial days. 

Tke^Massachusetts Bay 
Colony began as a trading 
company. The freemen or 
stockholders in the company 
chose a governor, a deputy 
governor and 18 assistants who 
managed the company affairs. 
Four times a year there was a 
"great and general court" of 



freemen of the company and at 
these meetings the freemen plus 
the governor and six of his 
assistants would make the laws 
and ordinances "for the good 
and welfare of said company, 
and for the government and 
ordering of said land and 
plantation..." 

This question is one of many 
now being received by the 
League of Women Voters' Voter 
Information Phone. Individuals 
with any questions on 
government may call the VIP 
Phone Monday through Friday 
between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. The 
number in the Boston area is 
357-5880, outside the Boston 
metropolitan area callers should 
dial the toll-free number 
1-800-882-1649. 




S09TX S10M 






FACTORY SERVICE 



_EOj_ 



RCA MOTOROLASYLVANIA 
ZENITH ADMIRAL WHIRLPOOL 

WEST1NCHOUSE 
Call 479-1390 





Consumer 
Corner 



By ROBERT H. QUINN 
Attorney General 

Thousands of assigned risk 
car owners in Massachusetts are 
being bilked of up to $200 each 
by scheming brokers who 
routinely charge for certain 
extra policy features without 
telling their customers. 

At this time of year when 
motorists are renewing their car 
insurance the Consumer 
Protection Division and the 
Criminal Division of my office 
caution consumers about 
understanding fully any 
insurance applications they may 
sign. 

Both of these divisions are 
conducting full-scale 
investigations of assigned risk 
insurance brokers for possible 
larceny-charging for insurance 
that is not written; consumer 
fraud; insurance law violations 
and "kickbacks" to auto dealers. 

The Consumer Protection 
Division urges assigned risk 
motorists to go directly to the 
Assigned Risk Bureau for their 
insurance rather than to 
insurance brokers who persuade 
them to sign blank applications 
and possible add "roll-ons" to 
their policies. 

These "roll-ons" or "extras" 
may include motor club 
membership and auto accident 
income protection plans, which 
the consumer may not want nor 
have need of. Some motorists 
have paid up to $200 for these 
extras without being told what 
the money was for. In another 
case a woman was taken for 
almost $400. / 

Massachusetts law requires 
brokers "to notify all assureds in 
writing of exact insurance 
coverage and names of 
companies covering risks; 
however many people are not 
jnformed of this and are not 
provided with a copy of their 
policies. 

Consumers should not sign 
any documents until the broker 
has specified in writing what the 
coverage is and what it will cost. 
In addition they should insist on 
receiving a copy of their policy 
even though they may be 
financing their insurance. 

BRAND NEW 
YEAR 

Ding-Dong! 
New Year Bells, 
Are joyfully clanging 
And swinging as the 
Dying echoes of Father Time 
Re-echoes ...bursting forth 
In loud-cries of the ! 
New-born Babe of '73. 

All over the globe, folks 
Shout and dance with glee 
As they approach the 
Time tick of its Birth-coming, 
Raising a toast to their 
Lips in celebration, dissolving 
Old broken vows, and 
Resolving new-potion 
promises. 

Days come and go 
While Time marches on ... 
Many a pledge has been 

broken, 

But as the old saying goes: 
"It's better to have tried and 

failed, 

than not to have tried at all." 
For the "prize of action," 
Is Effort-Power. 

Anna T. Anderson, Quincy 



FIGHT 
MUSCULAR 
DYSTROPHY 



■ • 




, Today 



8y Dr. William F. Knot 
HnoMt Counwlor 



'Laugh Down 
The Hurt Walls' 

The accumulation of hurts between husbands and wives.. .or 
between any two people. ..can destroy a happy 
companionship. ..make each suspicious.. .fearful of further hurt. A 
series of hurts can create a "hurt wall" between you. ..and until that 
"hurt wall" crumbles you'll live together under great strain. You'll 
act cold and indifferent. You'll be accused of things that aren't 
true. ..that you have another interest. ..that you've gone frigid or 
impotent. ..that you're "sick"...lack feelings. The truth is that the 
"hurt wall" has been built. ..and as more hurts continue the wall will 
be erected higher and higher. 

Sam and Joanie had been married four years.. .all four marked 
with misery... because Sam liked to play cards. Several nights a week 
the telephone would ring.. "We're getting up a little game. ..come on 
over". Nearly always Sam went. Joanie kept feeling more and more 
hurt. The pattern continued even after Samuel Jr. was born. ..and 
Joan's lonely evenings became unbearable. Then Joan began to get a 
baby sitter and go out evenings. The gulf between Sam and Joan 
increased. Sam continued to play cards.. .the "hurt wall" kept getting 
higher and higher. Sam couldn't see why she had become 
cold. ..didn't laugh. ..didn't want sex. ..acted so old and unhappy. 

At last under counseling.. .th; walls began to crumble. They 
crumbled for two reasons... first... Sam stopped responding to the 
calls from his friends. They agreed upon one evening a week which 
was -understood to be his "card night". They resolved the problem so 
that the same "hurt" didn't keep recurring. * , 

Secondly ...they talked about the old "hurt wali"...got so they 
could joke about it. ..laugh about it. Sam would say. .."Ole Jim's still 
going out on his wife to the card games". .."saw Ralph yesterday. at 
the Post Office. ..he lost sixty dollars at cards Monday 
night* 1 . .."really stupid isn't it..Jioney?" "Remember when I was just 
as stupid?" The "hurt wall" had crumbled. ..because the "hurts" had 
ceased. ..and now they could laugh about the things that once hurt. 

I heard a young minister addressing a group of ministers recently 
on the subject of humor. He thought and said that most ministers 
can use a little more humor when it's genuine and not just trying to 
be funny. He gave a formula which I thought great. Trauma + Insight 
+ Time = Humor. 

T*e trauma is the * 4 h u r t ".. .c ards... other 
glfl/man... money. ..silence... yelling... criticism. ..lack .. of- 
affect ion...any "hurt" 1hat you experience repeatedly. It must stop. 
It's trauma to your emotional life. 

Time will heal hurts. ..when there is insight which comes from 
talking...un!derstanding...reasoning... asking why?...answering 
why?...thus resolving the problem. Then you can laugh about those 
"terrible nights alone". .."the loss of money at cards". .."the verbal 
battles"..."the awful silences we used to have. Trauma + Insight + 
Time = Humor. The result of crumbled "hurt walls". 

For People ArirFor Loving.. .Dr. Knox's new book, write him 
sending $3 to 320, Washington St., Norwell, Mass. 0206I . 

FOR YOUR COMMENTS...For Group Therapy...For Private 
Counseling, write pr. Knox at 628 High St., Dedham, Mass. or call 
326-5990 or 659-7595. 

Commemorative Stamp 
Folders Now Available 



The 1972 Commemorative 
Stamp Folders, described, by 
Postmaster George K. Walker, "as 
the best way to begin a stamp 
collection" is now available in toll 
post offices in the Boston Postal 
District. \ 

A new stamp honoring stamp 
collecting is also available. It 
features the first U.S. postage 
stamp issued 1 25 years ago. 

"We are again pleased that we 



can make available these 
attractive Mini-Albums, which 
this year contain see-through 
mounts that will allow budding 
collectors to keep the stamps in 
their original condition", Walker 
said. 

He said the albums also show 
a reproduction of the first U.S. 
postage stamp issued in 1847, 
containing a likeness of 
Benjjunin Franklin, first 
Postmaster General. 



TICKLE BOX 9 



by Ted Trogdon 




"Oh. ?•*. Moth« ... G«org« is crony about th« ti»you gar* him." 



Page 6 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 4, 1973 




At Quiacy City Hospital 



December 19 

Mr. and Mrs. Ettore Marinilli, 
83 West St., a daughter. 

December 20 

Mr. and Mrs. William 
Macauley, 44 Farrington St.^ ju 
daughter. 

December 2 1 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul S. Pritt, 18 
Beacon St., a daughter. 

December 22 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis Beatrice, 
16 Woodward Ave., a daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis Murray, 
98 Bromfield St., a son. 

December 23 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Moran, 
30 Alrick Rd, a son. 

December 24 

Mr. tind Mrs. Gary Bullis, 1 1 5 
Taffrail Rd, a daughter. 



December 26 

Mr. and Mrs. David Allen, 24 
Summer St., a son. 



December 27 

Mr. arid Mrs. Louis A. Larson, 
40 Curtis St., a daughter. 

December 28 

Mr. and Mrs. James P. 
Torpey, 6 Adams Court, a 
daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jerome Adams, 
22 Albertina St., a daughter. 



At South Shore Hospital 

December 23 

Mr. and Mrs. William 
McDonnell, 60 Trafford St., a 
son. 

At Boston Hospital for 
Women 

December 15 \ 

; Mr. and Mrs. Fred J. Baldpck, 
36 Rock Island Rd, a son. .> 




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11 A.M. to 2 AM. 
Function Inquiries 
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441 lastKtSL. Item 
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471-99O0 




BREAKFAST MEETING - The public affairs and executive committees of the South Shore Mental 
Health Association held a breakfast recently for South Shore legislators to share information on the 
latest state and federal mental health legislation. From the left are Rep. Thomas F. Browned 
[D-Quincyl , Rep. William Spence [D-Hingham] , Mrs. Mary Tuohy, assistant to Congressman James A. 
Burke; Mrs. Madeline Moore, wife of the administrative assistant to Congressman Burke; Or. David Van 
Buskirk, director of the South Shore Mental Health Center; and Senator Allan R. McKinnon 
[D-Weymouthl . 

St. Ann's Marlanns To Hear Fr. John O'Connor 



St. Ann's Marianns will meet 
Jan. 10 at 8 p.m. in *he school 
auditorium. 

Mrs. Joseph McCaddea, 
chairman of the evening, 
announces that Rev. John J. 



O'Connor, former curate at St. 
Ann's in Wollaston, will be the 
featured speaker. His subject will 
be "Women". . 

Fr. O'Connor is presently 
administrator of St. Theresa's 



parish in Sherborn and also 
chaplain of the Massachusetts 
Correctional Institution at 
Sherborn. All women are 
cordially invited to attend. 



Janice Baker Engaged To Dennis B. DeNicola 



Mr. and Mrs. Edwin' L. Baker 
of 224 Common St., Braintree 
announce the engagement of 
their daughter, Janice L. to 
Dennis B. DeNicola. 

Mr. DeNicola is the son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Remo DeNicola of 



21 Burroughs Rd, Braintree, 
formerly of Quincy. 

Miss Baker is a graduate of 
Braintree High School and is 
attending the nursing school at 
Massasoit Junior College. 



South-West Seniors Whist Party Jan. 9 



Mr. DeNicola is also a 
graduate of Braintree High 
School and is a student at the 
University of Massachusetts at 
Amherst. 

A May 1974 wedding is 
planned. 



South-West Quincy Senior 
Citizens will hold a whist party 
Tuesday, Jan. 9 at 1 p.m. at the 
John Hancock School. Coffee 
will be served a half hour before 
the first deal. 



SUNSHINE 
TAPE CENTER 
16 Beale SL 
Wollaston 
STEREOS AND GIFTS 
LOW PRICES 



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1422 Hancock St.1 

Quincy, Map 

773.2170 
DIAMOND APPRAISING 

■•ESTATE APPRAISING 

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IDENTIFICATION 

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337-0288 

OPIN SUNDAYS 



94 WASHINGTON ST. WEYMOVTM UMOfNC 




Stir! Th* New Ysar Right 

Have your 

hair frosted 

and restyled 

RUSSELL 
DWARDS 

Hair Stylist 



r mmf ^ Fasbit. Sb«, M 

I53S Hone** St., Quincy 

Mil. Thru fit. II - | 
Thirt. ft Fri. Til I 

CLEARANCE 
SALE 

Suits, Dresses 
and Robes 

20% to 50% Off 
Sizes 8-20 




Many different styles! 



>♦* 



Marriage Intentions 



Sgt. Lawrence J. Sullivan, 42 
Blossom Rd, Brain tree, U.S. Air 
Force; Karen A. Calapa, 16 
Petrel Rd, Quincy, student. 



Richard P. Brangiforte, 35 
Harding Ave., Braintree, body 
worker; Cheryl M. Stalker, 21 
Orchard St., Quincy, writer. 



Joseph R. Maziarz, 49 Moore 
St., Chicopee, treasurer; Isabel 
M. Howe, 111 Shore Ave., 
Quincy, teacher. 



Melbourne W. Bowser, 77 
Boylston St., Boston, real estate 
developer; Dona M. 
D'Entremont, 404 Beale St., 
Quincy, teacher. 

Donald E. Eldridge, 49 
Massasoit Rd, North Weymouth, 
U.S.Navy; Paula Anderson, 27 
Shellton Rd, Quincy, 
bookkeeper. 

Timothy J. Galligan, 47 
Baxter Ave., Quincy, janitor; 
Lynne C. Hall, 1738 Washington 
St., Braintree, clerk. 



Trinity Lutheran Church Women 
To Hear AFS Exchange Students 



The Trinity Lutheran Church 
Women will meet Jan. 9 at the 
church. 

The business meeting will be 
at 7:15 p.m. and at 8:15 p.m. 
there will be a special program. 

The program will be 
presented by two American 
Field Service Exchange 
Students, Miss Joanne Ahola of 
Quincy and Miss Mary Bennett 
of Quincy. Miss Ahola is a senior 
at Quincy High School and will 
talk and show slides on her 
experiences as an Exchange 
Student to Stuttgart, Germany 
from June - August, 1972. Miss 
Ahola has been accepted into 



Brown University where she 
plans to study for a medical 
career. 

Miss Bennett, a freshman at 
Radcliffe College, spent one year 
as an Exchange Student in 
Belgium. She is a member of the' 
Harvard-Radcliffe American 
Field Service Returnee Club. She 
will, also, present slides and talk 
about her stay in Belgium. 

Mrs. John Kelley of 
Wollaston, President of the 
Quincy Chapter of American 
Field Service will speak about 
the AFS Program. The public is 
invited. 



Clare Crofwell On Dean's List 
At Mount St. Mary's 



Clare Crofwell, daughter of 



—mm 



DERRINGER 

THE FLORIST 
Plants Arrangements-Mowers 

773-M&9 



J{9 Hancock St. 



■M 



Mr. and Mrs. Gerard F. Crofwell 
of 44. Bowes Ave., Germantown, 
is on the Dean's List for the 
fourth straight time at Mount St. 
Mary's College in Hooksett, N.H. 

• 

Clare is a senior and an 
English major. 



Quincy Sons Of Italy 
Social Center 

120 Quarry St. Quincy 

• 

Newest function hall now available for weddings, showers, dinner 
dances. Main [Golden Lion] Suite has cathedral ceiling. Brides 
room - ultra modern sound system. Completely air conditioned. 

FOR RESERVATION CALL 
FANTUCCHK) REALTY - 773-7010 



coipitts says 

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Call Coipitts Now 472-0051 

Take A 
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In Rendezvous Time 1 

We will be happy to 
arrange your vacation! 



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Off Season Rates Are Now 
In Effect Until March 



/ 



Thursday, January 4, 1973 Quincy Sun Page 7 




WHEEL CHAIRS - Quincy Jewish War Veterans present three Lumex wheel chairs to the Brockton 
Veterans Administration Hospital in memory of Eli Brava, Adolph Pitonof and Harry Tannen. From left, 
Mrs. Rebecca Wolf, auxiliary president; Mrs. Beatrice Tannen, past president; Mrs. Enid Chanos, nurse; 
Mrs. Zelma Brava, past president; Nathan Goldberg, post hospital chairman; Louis Simons, 
quartermaster. 

Quincy Catholic Club Sleigh Bell Ball Jan. 20 



The Quincy Catholic Club 
will hold a Sleigh Bell Ball to 
benefit the scholarship fund 
Saturday, Jan. 20, at the 
Lantana, Randolph. 

There will be a social hour at 
7 p.m. with dinner served at 8 
p.m. The Exec's will provide 
dance music until midnight. 

Mrs. George W. Ross and Mrs. 
William E. Donnelly are 



co-chairmen. 

Mrs. John McRudin, Mrs. 
Thepphilus McLelland III and 
Mrs' John O'Malley are ticket 
chairmen. 

Committee members are: 
Mrs. Putnam Borden, Mrs. 
Everett Bracchi, Mrs. Anthony 
Constantino, Mrs. Charles Daley, 
Mrs. James F. Duggan, Mrs. 
Joseph I, Garity, Mrs. Edward 



Gillis, Mrs. John J. Hanratty. 

Also Mrs. Thomas E. Kenney, 
Mrs. Frederick McDougall, Mrs. 
George Molla, Mrs. Gerald T. 
Murray, Mrs. Nicholas Pepe, Mrs. 
Timothy J. Reidy, Mrs. Alfred 
Saluti, Mrs. Joseph Shea, Mrs. 
Paul Todd, Mrs. Thomas 
Turynowicz, Mrs. William Walsh, 
Mrs. John J. Sweeney. 



Mothers Of Twins To Hear Sportscaster 



The South Shore Mothers of 
Twins Club will hold, its regular 
meeting Jan. 8 at 8 p.m. at the 
George Bean Legion Post, 19 
Mollis St., South Weymouth. 

The meeting will be 
preceeded by cocktails from 
7:30-8 p.m. Fathers are invited 
to attend. Speaker will be John 
Carlson, sportscaster and 
"voice" of the New England 
Whalers hockey team. 

Members are reminded that 
this meeting is the deadline for 
submitting samples of their 



twins handwriting [ages two and 
upl«. Questions should -be. « 
directed to the research 
chairman,- Mr* Cart* -QflChUm.'"' •■;• 
The project, supervised by the 
National Organization of 
Mothers of Twins Club, Inc., is 
helping to support a study of 



I 



Handwriting Analysis by Dr. 
.Robert Larson. . >w ~& 4N » 
Prospective members seeking 
further informatitflK*lflpMt the 
club should contact the 
membership secretary, Mrs. 
Joseph L. Keenan of 48 Idlewell 
St., Weymouth. 



Night Owls Dance Jan. 13 



The Quincy Senior Citizens 
"Nite Owls" will hold a dance 



Saturday Jan. 13 at 8 p.m. at 24 
High School Ave. Pauline Maki is 
chairman. 



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Page 8 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 4, 1973 



l nil 



DEATHS 



Michael A. Lawton, 79, of 
1000 Southern Artery, at 
Quincy Gty Hospital, Dec. 22. 

Miss Margaret Nash, 72, of 51 
Barham Ave., at Quincy City 
Hospital, Dec. 22. 

Kenneth S. Ballon, 84, of 
Deaconess Rd, Concord, 
formerly of Quincy, at River 
Crest Nursing Home, Dec. 22. 

Mrs. Anna V. /MyrbeckJ 
Lindstedt, 80, of 8 MontilioSt., 
at a nursing home, Dec. 23. 

Lawrence B. Walker of 

Shelton, Conn., formerly of 

Quincy, unexpectedly in 
Columbia, Md., Dec. 23. 

Ernest L. Dixon, 50, 
Scarborough, Me., formerly of 
Quincy in the Maine Medical 
Center in Portland, Dec. 23. 

Edward A. Rahaim, 76, of 2 
Abbey St., at Quincy City 
Hospital, Dec. 23. 

Mrs. Frances [Martinoj _ 
Pasquariello, 45, of 26 Clark St., 
at Quincy City Hospital, Dec. 
25. 



Ernest Sargent, 74, of 19 
Edison Park, at Quincy City 
Hospital, Dec. 26. 

Edith F. Cove, 74, of 119 
fast Elfu A v* m ft a local nursing 
home, Dec. 26. 

H 

Patrick S. Lennon, 68, of 207 
E. Squantum St., unexpectedly 
in Hollywood, Fla., Dec. 26. 

Donald W. Rode, 45, 
formerly of Quincy, in a 
Treasure Isle, Fla. hospital, Dec. 
27. 

Joseph DeCoste, 71, of 57 
Grove St., at his home, Dec. 27. 

• Mrs. Ethel M. /DeLodge/ 
DeFazio, 61, of 30 Walnut St., 
at Quincy Gty Hospital, Dec. 
27. 

Mrs. Mabel / EichornJ 
Pawsey, 90, of 15 Pawsey St., at 
Quincy Gty Hospital, Dec. 27. 



Jerome Freeman, 55, of 37 
Hovey St., unexpectedly at 
Quincy Gty Hospital, Dec. 25. 

Arteo J. Cicconi, 82, of 48 
Cushing St., at Quincy Gty 
Hospital, Dec. 25. 

Mrs. Marie (HedstromJ 
Blowers, 85, of 24 Shennen St., 
at Quincy Gty Hospital, Dec. 
26. 

Mrs. lucretia / Avitablej 
Avitable, 85, of 515 Pond St., 
Braintree, formerly of Quincy, 
at Fran vale Nursing Home, 
Braintree, Dec. 26. 

Samuel C. Lyman, 90, of 56 
Aberdeen Rd, at Franvale 
Nursing Home, Braintree, Dec. 
26. 

Mrs. Diane M. /LePinej 
Dolbert, 30, of 43 White Pine 
Lane, Kingston, formerly of 
Quincy, unexpectedly at Jordan 
Hospital, Plymouth, Dec. 26. 

Walter B. Gadsby, 62, of 185 
Farrington St., unexpectedly at 
home, Dec. 27. 

Thomas E. Curran Sr., 62, of 
24 Safford St., on arrival at 
Quincy City Hospital, Dec. 27. 



Alfred J. Carolan Sr., of 57 
Edgemere Rd, at home, Dec. 28. 



Paul L Danick, 34, of 1 
Thatcher St., unexpectedly en 
mute to Quincy City Hospital, 
Dec. 28. 



John Eldridge, 23, of 900 
Southern Artery, in a car 
accident, Dec. 28. 

John A. Martell, 71, of 60 
Ratchford St., at a nursing 
home, Dec. 28. 

Mrs. Michelina [Tedesco) 
Giglio, 73, of 17 Union St., at a 
nursing home, Dec. 29. 

Mrs. Susan H. /Harrison J 
MacGregor, 73, of 262 Myrtle 
St., Ashland, formerly of 
Quincy, at Framingham Union 
Hospital, Dec. 29. 




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Correction Deputy To 
Sunday At United First 



Speak 
Parish 



Deputy Commissioner Larry 
Solomon of the Common- 
wealth's Department of 
Correction will discuss "Has the 
Need for Prisons Passed?" 
Sunday, Jan. 7 at the 10:45 a.m. 

service at the United First Parish 
Church [Unitarian) in Quincy 
Square. 

The discussion, with 
Commissioner Solomon will be 

in the format of a dialogue with 
the church's minister, Rev. John 
R. Graham. 

. Working under Commissioner 
John Boone, Solomon is 
responsible for the classification 




LARRY SOLOMON 



Following the service, 
Solomon, who came to his 
position in the Department of 
Correction on May 1, 1972, will 
answer questions. 

With a wide background and 
experience, Solomon is a 
31-year-old native New Yorker. 
He's a graduate of the University 
of Maryland and Howard 
University. 

of prisoners and for setting up 
and implementing new programs 
of treatment. Many of these 
programs represent new and 
controversial departures from 
the past. 



Rev. John Graham To Speak At 
S. S. Alcoholism Meeting In Hingham 



The South Shore Council on 
Alcoholism will hold a public 
meeting for members and 
interested persons from the 

community Jan. 8 at 8 p.m. in 
the auditorium of Old Ship 
Church, Hingham. 

Speaker will be Rev. John R. 



Graham of the United First 
Parish Church [Unitarian) in 
Quincy. Mr. Graham, a member 
of the Board of Directors of the 

S'outh Shore Council on 
Alcoholism, will discuss, "The 
Everpresent Problem of Helping 
People". Before coming to 



Quincy, Mr. Graham served as 
President of the National 
Council on Alcoholism in 
Denver, Colo. 

The South Shore Council on 
Alcoholism serves as a vital 
community resource in assisting 
alcoholics and their families as 
well as an educational agency. 



Quincy Federation Women To 
Hold Church Day Meeting Jan. 8 



The Quincy Federation of 
Women's Organizations will hold 
their Church Day meeting at 1 
p.m. Monday, Jan. 8. 

The hostess clubs will be the 
Doctors' Wives Club, Lodge 
Stella DelNord, Trinity 
Lutheran Church Women's 
Union and the Wollaston 



Congregational Church Women's 
Union. 

The meeting will open with a 
social hour followed at 2 p.m. with 
the business meeting, presided 
over by Mrs. Melville C. Gamble. 

Thumb nail sketches of the 
purpose and activities of three 
associate clubs will be presented 



by the club presidents. They are: 
Mrs. Dean Matthews, Atlantic 
Memorial Congregational Church 
Women's Union; Miss Eileen 
McCarthy, Bethany 
Congregational Church Women's 
Union; and Mrs. William Wolf, 
Jewish War Veterans Ladies 
Auxiliary No. 193. 



91 Pints Of Blood Donated In 
Memory Of William Horne,III 



Ninety-one pints of blood 
were donated at the second 
bloodmobile visit in memory of 
William Home 111, at St. John's 
School. 

The Home family sponsored 
and made arrangements for the 
visit with the Greater Quincy 
Red Cross Chapter. 

Those donating were: 

HORNE MEMORIAL - Rita 
K. Barry, George S. Bennett, 
Michael Carnevale, Gertrude 
Cochrane, John W. Cochrane, 
Cathy Collins, James E. Connell, 
Michael J. Connell, Nicholas 
Consolazio, Rosanne Cratty, 
Anne M. Damon, Elizabeth E. 
Damon, Amy D'Olimpio, Albert 
E. Foley, Richard D. Forrest, 
Martin Furfce, Rosemary Gans, 
Donald E. Gillis, folly Golden, 
John P. Griffin, Julia A. Griffin, 
Kevin A. Griffin, Hugh Hammill, 
John E. Harkins, Robert C. 
Harper, Janice Harvey, Marianne 
E. Home, Richard X. Home, 
William J. Home, Marcia G. 
Johnson, Kathleen M. Keeley. 

Robert Lafford, Gen. Lawlor, 



Eileen M. Leahy, Kathleen M. 
Leahy, Frank P. Lomano, John 
B. MacDonald, Helen M. 
MacKinnon, Janet Mechin, Craig 
B. Murray, Anna Nicklas, Alfred 
G. Odermatt, Marion T. 
O'Malley, Ann D. O'Toole, 
Margaret M. O'Toole, Margaret 
R. O'Toole, Alfred Pecce, 
Josephine M. Perico, Joseph M. 
Pokaski, Mable Pratt, Diane 
Quintin, Edward V. Rando, 
Mary S. Ready, Diane R. 
Schultz, Phyllis M. Seppala, 
John J. Trerrey, Peter R. 
Wenners. 

NEW ENGLAND 
TELEPHONE CO. - Dorothy K. 
Bowes, Marjorie R. Colton, Jean 
E. DiBona, Frederick J. 
Erickson, Mary Kennedy, Fred 
Olmstead. 

QUINCY FIRE FIGHTER* - 
Robert M. Burr, John T. Davies, 
John R. Menz Jr., William C. 
Todd. 

BRAINTREE LIGHT CO. - 
William J. Celia Jr., George W. 
Phillips Jr., John Robertson III, 
James Wentworth. 



ST. CHRYSOSTOMS 
CHURCH - Alfred C. Dunk, Jack 
Foster, William D. Underhill. 

MASS. ELECTRIC CO. - Paul 
L. McConary, David P. Zemina. 

HOOD MILK CO. - Frank 
Florio. 

VULCAN TOOL - Clarence 
E. Walker Sr. 

PROCTOR & GAMBLE - 
William MacLeod. 

INTERNAL REVENUE - 
John H. Harkins. 

WOLLASTON U.C.T. - Henry 
Tuton. 

KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS - 
Clement A. O'Brien. 

RURAL MASONIC LODGE - 
Carl O. Widman. 

REPLACEMENTS - Russel J. 
Beaulieu, June A. Beaulieu, 
Esther Holmes, Donald Hunter, 
Joan M. Stearns. 

OTHLRS - John Carey, 
Evelyn M. Cedarstrojn, 
Frederick P. Ruzanski. , 

The Home family provided 
and served the evening meal to 
the volunteers and professional 
staff.. 



Tobin Endorses Proposed Cerebral Palsy Clinic 



Sen. Arthur H. Tobin has 
endorsed 4, with great 
enthusiasm" plans to convert a 
garage at 10S Adams St. into a 
cerebral palsy walk-in clinic. 



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enhance the general appearance 
of the building and the 
immediate neighborhood," he 
said. 

"The benefits to the victims 
of cerebral palsy and the 
improvement in the appearance 
of the building make this project 
necessary." 

Tobin registered his support 



in a letter to Arthur Ciampa, 
executive director of Cerebral 
Palsy of the South Shore Area 
Inc 

He said the garage "is 
currently beins vandalized and 
needs to be altered in order to 
avoid becoming a blight. 

"Any construction, alteration 
or remodeling will serve only to 



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Thursday, January 4, 1973 Quincy Sun Page 9 



Quincy Firefighters Aid 
Fire Stricken Families 



Quincy firefighters paid a 
return visit to a fire-ravaged 
house on Phipps Street on 
Christmas Eve. 

This time the visit was a 
happy one. 

Members of Firefighters 
Local 792, AFL-CIO, played 
Santa Claus fey the seven 
children of the Fantasia and 
Kuja families who lost their 
Christmas presents in a fire that 
damaged their home on Dec. 22. 

Local President William 
Lowry, Vice President James 
Kelly and Secretary Thomas 
Gorman brought a turkey, a 
basket of fruit, toys for the 

Meadows Students 

Students at Broad Meadows 
Junior High School are deeply 
involved in Project KXUS [for 
Expressing Us|, the goal of 
which is to brighten the school's 
corridors through care, effort 
and creativity. 

The youngsters gave up a day 
of their holiday vacations to 
meet and plan their efforts for 
the project. 

One effort will be to cover 
the hallway leading to and from 
the gym with art work reflecting 
athletics. Another will be free 
passes to rock concerts to be 



younger children and a dress set 
for an older girl. 

Lowry and Kelly, both 
assigned to Central Headquarters 
Ladder One, were at the fire, 
too. 

Robert Noonan, an auxiliary 
firefighter, arranged for Santa's 
visit to the children of Mr. and 
Mrs. Nicholas Fantasia and Mr. 
and Mrs. David Kuja, who range 
in age from one year to 1 4 years. 

The Fantasia and the Kujas 
have been living in the rear of 
the building while awaiting 
repairs to the damaged front 
rooms of the two-story duplex 
at 102 Phipps St. 

In Project EXVS 

awarded tor the best posters 
contributed to the anti-litter 
campaign. 

The project is coordinated by 
Paul Grossman and Noreen 
Guest of the School's Spirit 
Committee and Student 
Advisory Board. 

Members of the spearhead 
.committee include Lynne 
Giordani, Joanne Cirino, 
K a t h If e n Boyle, Paul 
Southerlfcid, Chuck McDermott, 
Nancy Dougenick, Mary Foye, 
Maureen Craig, Cheryl 
Matthews, Kevin Donovan and 
Jackie Powers. 



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Page 10 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 4, 1973 



Quincy High-Voc. Tech NEWS 



Written by members of the Quincy High School Journalism Class 



OPEN CAMPUS: 

A STUDY IN 
RESPONSIBILITY 



Space Program Goes On Trial 



By KEVIN FOLEY 

Certainly the largest issae at 
Quincy High over the past three 
years has been that of Open 
Campus. 

Open Campus is a program in 
which a student has the 
alternative of doing something 
else during his study periods 
other than report to a study hall. 
He may have the option of 
leaving the school 'grounds or he 
can just go somewhere within 
the school. 

After much debate, Quincy 
High finally got Open Campus 
on an experimental basis in 
1 970. This was not until a lot of 
debate by the School 
Committee, and an unsuccessful 
student strike which almost lost 
the student body the chance for 
Open Campus. A few students 
abused the privilege v _ and the 
school was forced to drop the 
Open Campus program. 

In 1971, a restricted Open 
Campus program was finally 
agreed upon between the 
student body, the school 
administration, and most 
importantly, the School 
Committee. In the restricted 
program, certain areas were 
declared off limits to students 
during the school day. When the 
school started receiving 
complaints from neighboring 
nu'rohants jwWos© stores, were 
plagued with students during 
scn&bl hdofs/drteri Campus' WW* 
once again sure to perish. 

Under the guidelines of the 
original Open Campus proposal, 
the Open Campus program must 
be accepted yearly by the 
School Committee. Under the 
direction of Quincy High's 
principal, Hoyd Creighton, the 
proposal was re-drafted and 
re-submitted to the School 
Committee in August, 1972. The 



School Committee had 
reservations about re-instating 
the program due to it's 
unsuccessful history. While 
under "pressure" from various 
groups in the city, the School 
Committee surprisingly voted in 
favor of the Open Campus 
program. But the problem does 
not end here. 

Adhering to the promise that 
Open Campus would not cost 
the city one penny, the School 
Committee refused to allot the 
money :ne«je$sary to pay for a 
full-time Open Campus 
coordinator. They also restricted 
Open Campus to the school 
grounds in an attempt to 
alleviate outside complaints. 

Under the changes that the 
School Committee made in the 
Open Campus proposal, the 
school must prove that Open 
Campus will, still, work before 
re-instating the program, or 
something sinfilar in its place. A 
committee has been set up in the 
school to try to solve the largest 
problem that now faces Quincy 
High - how to control over 2,400 
students all at once in an Open 
Campus situation. 

As I see it, Open Campus per 
se is dead at Quincy High 
School. However, I am not 
saying that I am against Open 
Campus. If grade school children 
were given Open' Campus, 1 
doubt "if there would be any 
problem by the time they 
reached high school. It has 
always been human nature to 
take what is offered and try to 
take more. This is what 
happened with Quincy High's 
Open Campus program. 

It is humanly impossible to 
ask someone to adapt to an 
Or*en Campus situation 
overnight. 



By LISA COOPER 

On Wednesday, Dec. 20,. 
1972 in room 307 of Quincy 
High School, a trial by jury was 
held. The American Space 
program was the issue being 
debated. 

Judge Lori Carbanaro, a 

sophomore student, presided. At 

8:20 a.m. the prosecution called 

its first witness, Russell Rayner, 

a physics teacher, to the stand. 

Mr. Rayner said he thinks we 

should, "evaluate the best ways 

to spend our [taxpayer's] 

money." The money used to pay 

the . employees of N.A.S.A. 

should be put towards science 

research, employing top 

scientists which eventually aid 

many more people than the 

-s*pace program. 

Being an experienced teacher, 
the court established that Mr. 
Rayner is qualified to present 
factual information which would 
not be questioned. 

When the defense lawyer, 
Rick Hennessey, questioned the 
prosecutions second witness, 
Terry Roberts, a student, there 
was an objection by teacher, 
Charles MacLaughlin |for the 
prosecution). He stated that the 
witness was called to the stand 
as a student, only required to 
give her opinion, not factual 
information. The objection was 
overruled. 

Third witqess^ fof the 
prosecution, Karen Ryan, a 
student, said she feels that. man 
should take care of all his 
priorities here on earth first. At 
that, the defense proceeded to 
present information regarding a 
particular plastic invented within 
the space program which would 
help patients who suffer an 




DEFENSE Attorney Rick Hennessey questions prosecution witness 
in Space Program trial. 



irritating disease. There was an 
objection by the prosecution 
that the information was taken 
from a biased magazine. It was 
overruled. The prosecutions 
fourth witness was Carolyn 
Wencek, a QHS senior, who 
voiced similar opposition. 

The court took a brief 
five-minute recess before the 
defense called up their four 
witnesses. Marilyn Silverstein, a 
junior at QHS, believes the 
Space program came about due 
to man's inquisitive nature. The 
second witness, Linda Smith, 
student, explained that in her 
opinion, the Space program- is 
beneficial, because man is 
learning so many new things. 
This was followed by a brief 
conference with the judge. 

The third witness, John 
Chrusciel, head of the Quincy 
High Science Department, said 



he regards the space program as 
essential to the discovery of new 
techniques. He claims discoveries 
would be made up to 100 years 
later if it wasn't for the space 
program. He said that all the 
money spent is merely a drop in 
the bucket towards all the new 
inventions. 

Due to the lack of time, the 
trial will be continued after 
Christmas vacation. 

On the whole, it was 
extremely well organized. The 
students who participated were 
well informed and showed 
genuine concern and interest 
-regarding the positions they held 
in the trial. All statements made 
were backed up by evidence 
researched by students. 

This project was supervised 
by Charles MacLaughlin, biology 
and chemistry teacher at QHS 
and organized by his students. 



Provost On All-American Third Team 




By>FHANSULL4VAW- 

Former Qumcy FJigh School 
graduate John Provost has been 
named to the third team of the 
Associated Press' All-America 
squad. 

Although only a sophomore, 



the 5-1 1 180 pound Holy Cross 
student has been a starting 
cornerback this year, and has led 
the nation in interceptions with 
nine. 

Two years ago, John was a 
member of Quincy's only 



undefeated team in history, as 
he played .both cornerback and 
halfback. 

Let's hope that more of 
Quincy's athletes will make good 
in the college ranks in the years 
to come! 



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Thursday, January 4, 1973 Quincy Sun Page 1 1 



Top. News Events 



The students and faculty at 
Quincy High School were asked 
to rank in order the most 
important events of 1972 and 



PERSONALITIES OF 

1972 

1 . Mark Spitz 

2. Thomas Eagleton 

3. Henry Kissinger 

4. Bobby Fischer 

5. BorurSpaasky 

6. Clifford Irving 



new personalities who emerged 
in 1972. Following are the 
results: 

TOP NEWS EVENTS 

1. Presidential Election. 

2. President's trips to China 
and Russia. 

3. The Olympics. 

4. Natural Disasters - 
Mid-west floods, Nicaragua 
earthquake, etc. 

5. Apollo 17 and the end of 
man's moon exploration. 

6. Sports - The Chess Match, 
The World Series, The Super 
Bowl, The Stanley Cup. 



Latin Lives At Quincy High 



On Dec. 19, 42 members of 
the Latin Club celebrated a 
combined initiation ceremony to 
the Junior Classical League, a 
national organization involved In 
the studies of the classics. 

The Roman Holiday of the 
Saturnalia was also celebrated. 

Included in the initiation 
were six students from Quincy 
Point Junior High School, who 
travel along with others 
faithfully each day to the senior 
high for a Latin One class. 

The new- members were 
crowned with laurel wreathes 
and appropriate signs were hung 
around their necks as they were 
chained together in slave fashion 
and led singing songs in Latin to 
the Three Season's Restaurant 
for further ceremonies. 

The highlight of the 
entertainment was provided by 
some returning members who 
presented the short play "The 
Julius Caesar Caper". 
Participating in the comedy 
about a Roman private eye were 
Scott Critcher as Flavius 



Maximus, Jeffrey Bonish 
Brutus. Calpurnia was played by 
Mary Cronin, Brian Coombs 
played the part of Claudius and 
Mark Antony was portrayed by 
Jack Eisan. Also in the play were 
Judy Ryan as the secretary and 
Thomas O'Connell as a soldier. 

Officers elected for the 
coming year are Jeffrey Bonish, 
president; Roberta Ferguson, 
vice-president; Judy Ryan, 
secretary; Jack Eisan and 
Patricia Desmond, Aediles, and 
Gayle Tardif, treasurer. 

New members accepted are 
Brian Osborne, Richard 
Iacobucci, Lisa Kransberg, Marie 
Pettinelli, Gail Gorachy, Tracy 
Tardif, Edward McCowan, Paul 
Nigro, Edward Warshal, , Ellen 
Johnson, William Norkus, 
Alfredo Donato, Michael Rand, 
Cheryl Centrella, Jacqueline 
Green, Fred White, Susan 
Frawley, John Medige, Silvina 
Faellia, Vicki Foye and Teresa 
Masked. 

KATHERINE MYATT, 
Club Advisor 



• CHECKMATE • 

By WAYNE DUNN 

There are three games contained in any single game of chess. The 
opening game, the middle game, and the end game. 

However, before a player learns the last two mentioned, he must 
learn the strategy involved in the opening; for, if he doesn't, he will 
never play the game long enough to see the middle or the end. 

The strategy to opening the game is simple. Control as many of 
the central squares in the board as possible. The central squares are 
considered the K4 and Q-4 squares on their respective sides of the 
b»ard. The foHowing opening was named after a Catholic Bishop 
that created it. Its purpose is to control those central squares. 



RUY LOPEZ 



1. 

2. 



White 

P-K4 
KT-KB3 



Blacky 

P-K4 
KT - QB3 



The first two moves by White and Black are considered excellent 
opening moves for the following reasons: 

1 . open lines are immediately created tor two pieces [King Bishop 
and Queen] 

2. by developing these pieces the player is almost ready to castle 
his king to safety. 

3. each player exercises control of the squares Q-5 and KB-5. 

3. the knights are now developed for attack and also protection 
of pieces. 

To continue - 



3. 
4. 



White 

B-KT5 
B-K4 



Black 

P-QR3 
KT-B3 



This of course is just one opening of many controlling the central 
squares. 

To see how important it is to control^ in this way play a game 
against a friend as white and follow through. 

Then play another with an opening like P-KN3, P-QR4 as your 
first moves and see how twell you do. 



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CAST from last year's Page and Stage production with Mrs. Bernice Bennett, faculty advisor, are Greg 
Ward Margie Aaron, Joe Volaka, Paul Kelly, Peter Gacicia and Anne Donohue. 

[Greg Smith Photo] 

Drama Club To Present 'Good News' 



Quincy High School's Drama 
Club, with faculty advisor Mrs. 
Bernice Bennett and entitled 
"Page and Stage", has been very 
successful. 

Last year it performed 
"You're A Good Man, Charlie 
Brown", a total of eight times 



for senior citizens and 
elementary school children as 
well as the general public. 

This year the club is planning 
a musical entitled "Good News", 
about College times in the 
1930's. 

The production is scheduled 



for sometime in March at Broad 
Meadows Junior High School. 
The cast includes sophomores, 
juniors and seniors. All proceeds 
from the production go toward a 
scholarship for a student 
planning to major in Speech -or 
Drama. '"<-• *'"! ni ' ■'*"' ' 



'Horizon 9 Featured In Concert-Dance 



By JODY GANOE 

The Senior Class at QHVTS is 
sponsoring its first concert -dance 
of the year. 

"Horizon" will be featured; a 



band that plays everything from 
50's Rock 'n Roll to the latest 
sounds in music. 

The concert-dance will be 
held Saturday evening, Jan. 6, 



1973 from 8 to 11 p.m. in the 
upper Voc-Tech gym. 

So, truck on down to QHVTS 
to experience the sounds of 
"Horizon". 



Quincy High Student* Vi$it Berklee College 



Berklee College of Music in 
Boston recently hosted students 
from Quincy High School as part 
of its community service 
program. 



Students, accompanied by 
Mrs, Gale.H^rrjsqn saw, ,a, 
demonstration of the electronic 
synthesizer and sat in on 
keyboard and guitar workshops. 



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Page 1 2 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 4, 1973 

Winthrop Sargent, IV Elected 
President South Shore National Bank 



Business News 



Winthrop Sargent IV, 37, hasj 
been elected President of the 
South Shore National Bank. 
Announcement was made by 
Robert L. Blair, Chairman of the 
Board and Chief Executive 
Officer. 

South Shore National Bank 
with headquarters in Quincy, has 
34 offices in Norfolk County 
and lists assets of over $200 
million. 

South Shore National Bank is 
an affiliate of Multibank 
Financial Corp., the statewide 
multibank holding company 
which changed its name from 
Shorcbank Inc. on November 
21, 1972. 

Mr. Sargent was elected 
Executive Vice President of the 
bank in November 1971 and in 
February 1972 was elected to 
the Board of Directors. 

He joined the Bank in 1959, 
and has held a number of 
positions in marketing and 
general administration. He was 
elected Assistant Cashier in 
1961, Assistant Vice President in 
1965, Second Vice President and 
Marketing Director in 1966, and 
Vice President in 1968. 

In 1969, Mr. Sargent was 
actively involved in the 
formation of the bank's holding 




WINTHROP SARGENT, IV 

company, and in 1970 was 
appointed Vice President of the 
holding company. 

He is also a director of the 
Bank's two leasing subsidiaries, 
Shorebank Leasing, Inc., Process 
Control Systems Leasing, Inc., 
and a director of Shorehaven 
Bank International. 

During this past fall, he was 
South Area Chairman for the 
Mass. Bay United Fund Drive. 

He is Trustee of the Novelty 



Liquidating Trust; Trustee and 
Member of the Finance 
Committee of the 
Sargent-Murray Association of 
Gloucester; a director of the 
South Shore Chamber of 
Commerce and a member of the 
Mayor of Quincy's Steering 
Committee. 

Among his other activities 
are: member of the Joint 
Legislative Committee of the 
Massachusetts Bankers 
Association; trustee, 1000 
Southern Artery Senior Citizens 
and member of the Advisory 
Board-Quincy Center Business 
and Professional Association. 

He is a member of the Owl 
Club and the Hasty Pudding 
Institute of 1770 at Harvard, a 
past Treasurer of the Quincy 
Cancer Drive in 1965, and of the 
Quincy March of Dimes in 1966. 

Mr. Sargent was in the class 
of 1953 at Milton Academy and 
1957 at Harvard College. He was 
also a member of the class of 
1963 at Northwestern 
University's School of Financial 
Public Relations and Marketing. 

He lives in Hingham with his 
wife, the former Sally-Ann Jones 
and their three sons, Winthrop, 
15, Bradford, 14, and Andrew, 
8. 



David Carr Auditor At 
Charlestown Savings Bank 

David S . Carr of 8 
Buckingham Rd, Wollaston was 
recently elected Auditor of the 
Charlestown Savings Bank. 

Charlestown is the third 
largest savings bank in 
Massachusetts with assets in 
excess of $650 million. 

Carr joined the Charlestown 
Savings Bank in 1961. He 
formerly held positions at the 
Bank of America, California and 
the County Bank and Trust Co., 
Cambridge. 

Carr is a graduate of 
Brookline High School and 
attended Bentley College. He 
received his B.S. Degree from 
Northeastern University. 

He is the Community 
Chairman of the Charlestown 
United Fund and Vice President 
of the Charlestown Kiwanis 
Club. 

Mr. and Mrs. Carr, the former 

$100,000 N. E. Electric Grant 




DAVIDS. CARR 

Barbara A. Godfrey have two 
children, David and Richard. 



South Shore National Wins Travelers Check Contest 



The South Shore National 
Bank has won first prize in a 
national traveler's check sales 
contest sponsored by the First 
National City Bank of New 
York. 

The South Shore National 
Bank has 34 offices in Norfolk 
County and lists assets of over 
$200 million. 

Competing nationally with 
banks in its category, the South 
Shore National Bank sold more 
"First" National City Bank 
travelers checks than any other 
bank listing assets between 
$100-500 million. The winner of 
' this contest which is conducted 
four times each year is awarded 
an interest free deposit of $1.5 
million for three months. 

Robert L. Blair, Chairman of 
the Board, stated, "The South 



Shore National Bank is proud to 
be the first bank in New England 
to ever win this contest. The 
Bank has placed in the top three 
in all the previous four contests, 
and I believe that past 



performance and this most 
recent award are an indication of 
the Bank's ability to provide the 
community with the fullest 
banking services available." 



New England Electric has 
made a $100,000 research grant 
to help in funding a new energy 
laboratory planned for the 
Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology. 

Objective of the MIT 
Laboratory is to establish a 



center to tie together and 
expand on the more than $5 
million in energy related 
research already underway in 
various departments within the 
university. Also, it will provide 
faculty and students the 
opportunity to become involved 
in energy-related studies. 



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Thursday, January 4, 1973 Quincy Sun Page 13 



Complete Text Of Mayor Hannon's Mid-Term Address 



This is the text of Mayor 
Walter J. Hannon's mid-term 
address. 



As one year draws to an end 
and another begins. I am taking 
this opportunity to report to 
you, the citizens of Quincy, on 
the accomplishments and 
problems of your City 
government and this 
administration during the past 
12 months. This first year, as 
your Mayor, has been for me a 
time of mixed blessings. Never 
does a day go by when in the 
space of a few short hours you 
can have a feeling of great 
accomplishment only to be 
taken back by a new arid more 
serious problem than the last. 

COURT ORDERED 

REVALUATION WILL HURT 

TAXPAYERS, RENT PAYEERS 

No problem has been more 
difficult than the matter of taxes 
and finances in our community. 
Today, with* cities and towns so 
dependent upon an unfair 
property tax, all decisions 
become dominated by our 
attempt to minimize tax effect. 
Also, since 1965 when a 10 
taxpayers' suit for 100% 
revaluation was filed and now 
recently when a similar suit has 
been filed, the threat of 
court -ordered revaluation has 
hung over our City. 

These two suits and the most 
recently filed suit can mean 
disaster for our community. 
Court-ordered revaluation will 
automatically increase the tax 
burden of the homeowner by 
shifting a greater share of taxes 
from the business and industrial 
community to residential 
property owners. Those who will 
suffer the greatest are the elderly 
over 70, the veterans, and 
widows who now receive 
substantial abatements and those 
of limited and fixed incomes. 

But make no mistake about it 
- all homeowners and rent payers 
will be hurt, i do not want to see 
the property tax distribution of 
this City determined by a court 
based upon a law which is unfair 
and unjust. As a member of the 
legislature I have worked to 
change this unfair law by 
amending the constitution of the 
commonwealth but, 
unfortunately, to no avail. 

These citizens, who have 
innocently signed a petitior f jx 
lower taxes have been 
hoodwinked into being part of a 
suit to revalue this City at 1 00%. 
I ask these same people to now 
direct their energy to helping 
this administration fight this suit 
in the court as I and the past 
administration have been doing 
successfully for the past seven 
years. 

On behalf of the homeowners 
of this City, I ask today that this 
suit, calling for court-ordered 
revaluation, be withdrawn. 

NO RESIDENTIAL 
ASSESSMENT CHANGES IN 1973 



Because properties are now 
fairly valued through the 
equalization program, there will 
be no residential assessment 
changes in 1973. I repeat, there 
will be no residential assessment 
changes in 1973. If your 
property was not reassessed this 
year, it is because the Board of 
Assessors believe its value was a 
full, fair and accurate one. There 
is no reason to believe it will 
change in 1973. 

The decision to equalize taxes 
was not an easy one, but the 
decision was made knowing that 
the alternative was i00% of 



value. I again reaffirm my total 
opposition to 100% of value. 

I was fully aware of the 
• financial problems of 1972 when 
I took office a year ago today 

My Department Heads have 
been more than cooperative in 
the past 12 months. Men such as 
Alexander Smith, who have to 
live with the fiscal problem on a 
day to day basis, time and again 
nave reminded me of the 
tinancial plight in our City 
Therefore, on September 15, my 
office issued a directive that all 
budgets were to be frozen AH 
Purchase orders must be 
personally cleared by me. This 
has been done and done 
successfully. 

Our job now is to keep 
Quincy's expenditures to an 
absolute minimum and to do 
everything possible to reduce 
ongoing City spending. We have 
already taken several steps to 
stop unnecessary spending. 

For example, we have: 

1. Stopped non-emergency 
overtime expenses. 

2. Established a Citizens 
Capital Improvements 
Committee which reviews and 
recommends cuts in City 
department requests for capital 
expenses. 

3. Established a Citizens 
School Building Needs 
Committee to review and make 
recommendations on school 
capital construction needs. 

4. Established the position of 
Budget Director in the Mayor's 
Office at no City cost to review 
and reduce current expenses and 
to establish a more efficient 
budget review process for 1973 
and the future. 

5. Negotiated and settled 
union contracts for a two-year 
period, rather than one year, at a 
fair and equitable level so that we 
can financially plan ahead more 
intelligently. 

These steps are beginning to 
show results and, when 
continued and intensified, will 
help keep taxes down. But we 
must do more. Therefore, I shall 
take the following steps in the 
coming weeks and months to 
fight the cost of City 
government: 

STEPS TO FIGHT COST 
OF CITY GOVERNMENT 

1. 1973 City Budget - I am 
requiring City Departments to 
roll back general expense and 
capital costs requests to 1970 
levels. 

2. Federal Revenue Sharing - 
All funds, estimated today at 1 .4 
million dollars over the next 1 2 
months, will be applied directly 
towards keeping the tax rate 
down. 

3. License and fees - I shall 
initiate an analysis of charges for 
licenses and fees in Quincy in 
order to assess costs for various 
inspections and licenses and 
more directly on users rather 
than the tax rate. 

4. 18 - Month Budget -State 
law now requires that local fiscal 
years begin July 1 of each year. 
One aspect of this legislation 
froze all assessments for an 
18-month period. In effect, such 
complexes as State Street South 
and Kemper Insurance would 
pay no additional taxes for a 

-year and a half. These two 
buildings paid $730 thousand 
dollars in taxes to Quincy for 
the year 1972. I have helped 
develop legislation which has 
been filed to correct this so that 
we can properly assess these 
buildings as well as nil other new 
developments. 

I have also worked with local 
Mayors and Selectmen in the 
past few months to see that 
necessary corrective legislation is 



put into effect so that the first 
transitional year will impose no 
extra costs on cities and towns. 

Although finances have 
dominated our activities for 
these months, there are several 
areas in which, I believe, specific 
accomplishments have been 
made to provide better service 
for your tax dollar. 

After extensive personal 
efforts on Beacon Hill, 
Legislation authorizing the 
county to purchase the 
Wollaston Golf Course for open 
space recreation was passed by 
the legislature and signed by 
Governor Sargent. We now look 
to the completion of 
negotiations between the 
County Commissioners and Golf 
Club so this facility will become 
public domain. 

We were also able in 1972 to 
have lighting fixtures installed at 
Adams Field. These lights will 
triple the utilization in this area 
rather than necessitate the 
construction of additional 
facilities. This past year also 
marked the dedication of 50 
acres of open space at the 
Black's Creek marsh and 
acquisition of 17 acres of 
marshland in Houghs Neck. Both 
projects were assisted by federal 
and state financing and will 
permanently preserve vital open 
space resources for our 
community. 

TO CONTINUE COMMITMENT 
TO QUALITY OPEN SPACE 

We shall continue our 
commitment to provide quality 
open space recreation facilities. 
In the near future, I shall 
submit, to be assisted through 
federal funds, the following park 
and recreation programs: 

1. The acquisition of Squaw 
Rock in Squantum. 

2. The acquisition of 
approximately 10 acres of open 
space and beach area in 
Germantown. 

3. The acquisition of open 
space and beach area at the end 
of Mound Street in Quincy 
Point. 

4. Physical improvements and 
upgrading of Faxon Park. 

I will ask the Council to pass 
a bond issue to finance these 
worthwhile programs. 

SPRING OFFENSIVE 
PLANNED TO BEAUTIFY 
CITY 

In the coming year, I will 
make every effort to make our 
City cleaner and more attractive. 
Every citizen wants the streets in 
his neighborhood to reflect the 
quality of his own home and 
environment. In 1972, we 
purchased three new street 
sweepers giving us a total of five, 
hardly enough for a City our 
size. This year I would like to 
see greater public involvement in 
making our City more attractive. 
Therefore, 1 shall ask civic and 
scout organizations, national 
guard units and the garden clubs 
of this City to join with us in a 
"Spring Offensive" to beautify 
our City. If we work together to 
plan and organize the upkeep 
and beautification of our 
community, we can do a better 
job than ever before. 

ESTABLISHMENT OF 
HISTORIC ZONING STUDY 
COMMITTEE 

In order to provide even 
greater protection for the beauty 
and attractiveness of our historic 
areas, I am asking the City 
Council to establish a Historic 
Zoning Study Committee to 
review our historic areas and 
sites and make recommendations 



to the City Council on the 
establishment of zoning methods 
to insure the long term 
preservation of our Citv's 
architectural and historic assets. 

Of all of our Federally 
assisted programs, the one that 
has proven most beneficial is the 
HUD program. This program has 
worked .successfully in the 
Wollaston and North Quincy 
areas. One area where important 
improvements have occurred 
during the last year is in Quincy 
Point. Here, through Federally 
assisted Neighborhood 
Improvement Project $1/2 
million dollars has been directed 
to home loans and grants and 
nearly $3/4 million dollars is 
being expended on streets, 
curbs, sidewalks and trees to 
upgrade Quincy Point to 
continue to make it one of our 
finest neighborhoods. 

I look to the Federal 
Government to continue this 
type of neighborhood program 
so that we may offer this service 
to other sections of our City 
because these Federal dollars 
accomplish needed public works 
and provide direct assistance, to 
Quincy homeowners. 

HUMAN SERVICE 
PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT 



As well as improving, 
upgrading and maintaining a 
physical quality of life in our 
community, we have worked on 
and developed programs for 
better human service in our 
community. 1972 saw the 
establishment of an alcoholic 
detoxification and rehabilitation 
center at the Quincy City 
Hospital, 1 am pjoud of my role 
in helping to initiate this project 
with a $225,000 grant from the 
State Department of Public 
Health. This program is helping 
to deal with a serious sickness. 
Faxon House, to date, has 
helped over 240 people. I look 
ahead to and will support efforts 
at greater public education 
regarding the problem of 
alcoholism. Alcoholism attacks a 
person and not only destrqys 
hirnself but the whole 
framework of his family" life, his 
job, his home and children. 

We are proud of Faxon House 
and the people who worked so 
hard to make it a reality. 

One of the most serious 
problems facing our youth today 
is the drug problem. When I first 
assumed office, I suggested that 
significant efforts would be 
made by this administration in 
the field of drugs. Today we are 
fortunate to have Mr. John 
Mahoney coordinating city-wide 
action on this problem. We are 
making great strides with the 
cooperative efforts of Survival 
and the Police drug units in 
combating this menace. 

Our City has been noted for 
many years for its fine * 
educational system. Certainly 
now we can least afford to 
neglect this asset because times 
seem difficult. 

We must never let our school 
facilities fall into disrepair and 
let our quality education suffer 
as some neighboring Cities and 
Towns have done. 

Two new buildings have been 
built at North Quincy High, the 
Little Building and the Teele 
Building. Both have proven 
successful. Is this an answer to 
overcrowded high schools? 

TO CAREFULLY REVIEW 
CLASSROOM NEEDS 

I shall ask in 197? for the 
School Building Needs 
Committee to carefully review 
all aspects of our classroom 
needs, bearing in mind the 
decrease in school population 






and the closing of many of the 
parochial schools in the near 
future. The Committee will, in 
turn, make recommendations to 
my office and tfie City Council 
for a permanentfsolution to the 
overcrowded conditions. 

In South Quincy, 
construction of the 
Lincoln-Hancock School is 
proceeding on schedule. This 
much needed facility will 
include space and programs 
developed cooperatively with 
community groups. This is to be 
Quincy's first involvement in the 
community schools concept and 
my office shall stand ready to 
assist both the School 
Department and representatives 
of the community in the months 
to come. 

CULTURAL DEVELOPMENT 
PROGRAM PLANNED 



Involvement in community 
activities builds the spirit of a 
City and becomes an important 
element of that community. 1 
would like to see the City of 
Quincy develop more in the way 
of cultural activities, especially 
during the spring and summer 
months. My office «is going to 
begin to examine this approach 
and we hope a program will 
come from it that Quincy 
citizens can enjoy. 

MORE HOUSING FOR 
SENIOR CITIZENS 

Quincy can I proud of its 
2,000 senior tizens. housing 
units. More sh. .1 be added this 
year as 1 shall break ground for 
Senior Citizens Housing at Clay 
Street. 

In April of this year, F,erino 
House will be completed and is a 
credit to our City and we 
congratulate the Wollaston 
Lutheran Church on this project. 
These two new facilities will 
add 300 more heeded units. 

Although our City is beset 
with problems, it is not a time 
for despair. Undoubtedly, there 
will have to be changes, new 
formulas for instance,, to bring 
about better State and Federal 
cooperation in, financial 
assistance to our City. But to 
forecast the failure of the 
American system is to assume 
that the brain power and 
resourcefulness of our vast 
number of educated citizens 
have been exhausted. 

The basic ingredient that 
makes possible a successful 
government and a satisfying life 
for the citizenry is fundamental 
honesty. 

AN INHERENT SENSE 
OF HONESTY 

The problems that Quincy 
will face in the next several years 
are bound to be complex, but 
they can be solved 5 if there. is an 
inherent sense of honesty. We 
are dependent on the 
effectiveness of religious 
teaching and a dedicated 
determination to distinguish 
right from wrong. We must be 
guided by a national conscience. 
The old cliche "Tell them what 
they want to hear" can no 
longer be used -by modern 
politicians. People today are well 
educated and intelligent and 
must be told the, facts as they 
are. P pie are tired of being 
spoon d by politicians. 

Thi. is not a time for 
pessirri m or for optimism but 
for realism. 

We need, as always, words of 
caution and constructive 
criticism. Facts must be faced 
and decisions courageously 
made, based on what is good for 
the people and what is best in 
the long run for the welfare of 
our City. 



wmmmmm 



Page 14 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 4, 1973 




Z. Cranston Smith Re-appointed 
To Metropolitan Planning Couneil 




AWARD - Thomas A. Callahan of 75 Farrington St., Wollaston, 
accepts the March of Dimes Certificate of Appreciation on behalf of 
Purity Supreme Inc., from Ann Wallace, March of Dimes 
Representative. For the past two years. Purity Supreme has 
participated in the Pepsi-Cola sponsored "Save a Nickel. ..Give a 
Nickel" campaign which has raised over $200,000 nationally for the 
March of Dimes fight against birth defects. Callahan is the beverage 
buyer for Purity Supreme. 




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South Shore Chamber of 
Commerce Director Z. Cranston 
Smith has been reappointed by 
Mayor Walter J. Hannon to a 
three-year term on the 
Metropolitan Area Planning 
Council, to represent Quincy. 

Smith, who has also acted as 
a liaison between the Chamber 
and the Council, has served on 
the Council since 1963, advising 
the Chamber of areas of specific 
and general concern in the towns 
in the Chamber's service area. 

Smith has served on several 
MAPC committees and task 
forces, including: Solid Waste 
Disposal, and Transportation. He 
currently serves on the Technical 
Advisory Committee on 
Housing, and the Technical 
Ad/isory Committee on 
Regional Organization, and is a 
member of the executive 
committee. 

The MAPC is comprised of 
101 cities and towns in Eastern 
Massachusetts. Its purpose is to 
conduct regional planning and to 
coordinate other planning 
efforts in Metropolitan Boston 
on a regional basis. 

Steven Blacker 
Navy Recruit 
Grad 

Fireman Recruit Steven B. 

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"Xritota I. Blacker of 5 4 
Elmwood Park, Wollaston, has 
graduated from recruit training 
at the Naval Training Center in 
Orlando. 

A 1971 graduate of North 
Quincy High School, he is 
scheduled to report to Aviation 
Electronics Technician School, 
Orlando, Fla. 



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help books for financial sue- are to become successful. Such 
cess are unanimous on this: partnerships have often 
Work. proved fruitful as persons 

We think of several per- teamed up their competences, 
sons who have talked to us at Now may be the time to con- 
times of projects they have in * suit with these carefully se- 
mind and for which they l«*ed individuals and sound 



seem to have special capaci 
ties. Each time we encounter 
them and ask how their proj- 
ect is coming along, they offer 



out their interest in your pro- 
posal. 

If at this point you decide 
to do no more than investigate 



excuses or explain delays that some of the self-help litera- 

reflect an apparent unwilling- *ure mentioned in these col- 

ness to get to work on it. " mns . this too is a positive 

Carlyle defines genius as f™ that "»? * mean,n ^ 

•an infinite capacity for hard fu, A for J * . . .. . 

work." HenrJ j Kaiser's J*"*. . the Z ? I'll 

working mother left him a «*■ w , h / ch . ma y * fou " d at 

legacy t this priceless advice: £ CSfif SH^^E 
Henry, nothing is ever ac 



complished without work. If 
I leave you nothing else but 
the will to work, I will have 
left you the priceless gift: the 
joy of work." 

If you have heeded the ad- 
vice of these experts in pre- 
vious columns — if you have 
decided you really want to be- 
come wealthier, if you have 
found an idea that over- 
whelms you, and if you are 
eager to get to work on it — 
now is the time to acquire ad- 
ditional knowledge about the 



leon Hill's Think and Grow 
Rich, W. Clement Stone's 
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Mental Attitude, William H. 
Danforth's / Dare You!, Alex 
F. Osborn's Applied imagina- 
tion, Louis Binstock's The 
Power of Faith, Dorothea 
Brande's Wake Up and Live, 
and Norman Vincent Peale's 
The Power of Positive Think- 
ing. 

Others that may be avail- 
able include Edwin Clarke's 
The Art of Straight Thinking, 
George S. Clason's The Rich- 



ditionai knowledge about the w/ Mm ifJ Eahylon> S . I 
field in which your thoughts H ayakawas Language' in 
are engaged. Thought and Action, Alex F. 



engaged. 

A personal study program 
or special courses to increase 
your knowledge will develop 
your enthusiasm for the proj- 
ect and enhance your desire 
to put it in operation. 

It mav be that you recog- 
nize deficiencies in your own 



Osborn's Your Creative Pow- 
er, Fulton J. Sheen's Life Is 
Worth Living, and the auto- 
biographies of Benjamin 
Franklin and Andrew Car- 
negie. 

You may find in one of 
them the spark that ignites. 



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On The Screen 

By Vincent Puleo 



Peter O'Toole 
6-3, 140 Pounds 

Warner Bros, is preparing a documentary on the life of the late 
JIM I HENDRIX. The film will include previously unreleased footage 
on HENDRIX... The Greek motion picture theatre business is in 
financial trouble. Local TV serials have resulted In a 70% drop in 
theatre attendance... If the situation worsens, Greek exhibitors and 
distributors may be forced to close down better than 40% of the 
theatre's in that country... 

A new star on the horizon, singer-actress MARA LYNN 
BROWN... MARLON BRANDO is one of the principal owners in an 
Honolulu based lobster farming business... ALBERT FINNEY is 
being wooed for the lead role in the film version of LADISALS 
FARAGO'S novel "THE GAME OF FOXES"... "1776" is breaking 
box office records nationwide. At N.Y.C's. Radio City Music Hall, 
"1776" did a hefty $1.3 million plus it's first month... And locally 
the response has been just as enthusiastic... Massive queuing lines; 
capacity business; happy fans... 

Starlet LINDSAY WAGNER [sounds political] snared the femme 
role opposite TIMOTHY BOTTOMS in "THE PAPER CHASE". And 
more besides this important... She also had her option with Universal 
Pictures extended. Last year she was picked up by Universal, and 
signed to a one year pact... The option to renew rested with 
Universal with the proviso she showed "promise". Since she did in 
that space of time, Universal has extended its option on her for an 
unlimited duration... I have a hunch the tag LINDSAY WAGNER is 
going to set more than one marquee on fire... An actress to watch... 

According to director RICHARD ATTENBOROUGH "YOUNG 
WINSTON" is not a conventional epic, but rather "one best 
described as the first truly intimate epic"... If the name BERN1E 
CASEY rings a bell amongst sports fans who see his name on top of 
the marquee as star of "HIT MAN" it should. The actor was a one 
time starter for the Los Angeles Rams... CASEY has appeared in a 
number of other movies as well; "TICK...TICK...TICK", "THE 
GUNS OF THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN" and the recent 
"BOXCAR BERTHA"... 

For all the raves DIANA ROSS has received for "LADY SINGS 
THE BLUES", co-star BILLY DEE WILLIAM^seems, at least to 
this columnist, to have gotten lost in the shuffle! And I think this is 
an injustice... His portrayal is four star all the way. In fact I'll go 
right out on the proverbial limb by predicting stardom for him... 
Those who saw him in this flick, and in TV's "BRIAN'S SONG" as 
GAYLE SAYERS, will understand my limb climbing. WILLIAMS is 
a superlative actor. One of the better of the new crop around... 

The reason "AVANTI" is a wacky earthy comedy is because it 
boasts the top comedy-writing team in the business today [or any 
day], BILLY WILDER and sidekick I.A.L. DIAMOND. For those 
seeking the utmost in fun, escapist enjoyment, won't want to miss 
the JACK LEMMON starrer... Good holiday fare... Odds and ends on 
"AVANTI": Co-star JULIET MILLS "beefed" up for her role of a 
well padded English girl zooming from her customary slim 97 
pounds to a curvaceous 1 23... 

A pat on the back to WILL GEER for his earthy, mountain man 
performance in "JEREMIAH JOHNSON"... "SOUNDER" producer 
ROBERT B. RADNITZ FEELS "there is no reason why a film that 
children are to see can't be made quite as artistically as an adult 
film"... And to that I say "aye"... Thinking out loud and wondering 
when you're going to see "THE GETAWAY", "THE POSEIDON 
ADVENTURE", and "PETE 'N TILLIE"?... TROY DONAHUE is 
still with us [for better or worse] . He's been signed to topbill "THE 
LAST STOP". And maybe one of these days, he'll become an 
acceptable facsimile of an actor... 

Isn't PETER FALK'S "COLOMBO" one of your better character 
pieces around today? I think so... And the "GREAT GATSBY" 
casting chase is finally over, After months of interviewing scores of 
actors and actresses for' the film version of F. SCOTT 
FITZGERALD'S classic American novel, Paramount Pictures have 
decided on the twosome of ROBERT REDFORD and MIA 
FARROW... KIM NOVAK, a lady we haven't seen on the screen for 
a year or three... 

But. ..should be seeing very shortly.., RITA HAYWORTH was 
originally cast [as told in this column months ago] in "TALES 
THAT WITNESS MADNESS". All went well - for the first week... 
Depending on whose version one believes, Miss HAYWORTH [1] 
walked off the set, [2] left the set because of illness, or [3] was 
tired for walking out on the production... Whatever her reasons for 
not being affiliated with "MADrsSSS", KIM NOVAK was 
immediately signed as her replacement... This will be her first film 
since the big bomb of several years ago when she co-starred with 
CLINT WALKER in "THE GREAT TRAIN ROBBERY"... 

Peeking behind the scenes: for a total of 89 days, PETER 
6'TOOLE arrived on the "LA MANCHA" set two hours early in 
order to undergo the makeup transformation that converted him 
into the doddering old man in his seventies... Arid speaking of 
O'TOOLE, yup he's really & foot 3, with slightly less than 140 
pounds stretched over his lean, wiry body... 



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Thursday, January 4, 1973 Quincy Sun Page 15 

Quincy Junior College Offers 
ing Credit, Non-Credit Courses 



Quincy Junior College 
announces its Spring semester 
offering of credit and non-credit 
courses. 

Registration for the courses 
will be held at the college on 
Coddington St. from 9 a.m. to 4 
p.m. on Jan. 29, 30 and 31. 

Being offered: 

CREDIT COURSES: The 
introduction of a new course, 
Introduction to Early Childhood 
Education, highlights the more 
than 30 courses offered for 
college credit by the Evening 
Division. This three-credit course 
may be taken simultaneously 
with Child Psychology and is a 
possible first step in the 
establishment of a proposed 
degree program in Early 
Childhood Education. 

Other college credit courses 
include American Literature, 
General Biology II, Anatomy 
and Physiology H, Economics, 
English Composition I and II, 
Survey of Fine Arts, Elementary 
French II, Elementary Spanish 
II, College Mathematics II, Music 
Appreciation, Physical Science, 
General Psychology, Child 
Psychology, Effective Speaking, 
English Literature, History of 
Western Civilization, 
I n'ternationaJ Relations, 
Sociology, Contemporary Social 
Problems, United States History, 
Intermediate French I, 
Intermediate Spanish I, and 
Learning Disabilities of the 
Adolescent. 



I n Business Administration 
the courses include American 
Economic History, Business 
Law, Fundamentals of 
Accounting II, Intermediate 
Accounting II and Principles of 
Marketing. 

Secretarial courses will be 
Shorthand I and II, Typing I and 
II, Business Communications 
and Secretarial Procedures. 

NON-CREDIT COURSES: 
Three new courses, including 
Introduction to Photography, 
Conversational French and A 
Feminist Look at Women's 
Fiction, have been added to the 
regular non-credit curriculum of 
the Community Services 
Division. The non-credit courses 
run from 1 to 13 weeks. 

The course in Photography, 
which may also be taken for 
college credit, will deal with the 
basic principles of photographic 
equipment and technique, use of 
various cameras and a brief 
introduction to darkroom 
chemistry; No student will be 
required to purchase equipment 
on his own in order to take the 
course. 

Conversational French is a 
practical course created for 
persons who are interested in 
acquiring or continuing their 
knowledge of French for fun, 
travel or business purposes. It 
will offer elementary 
c o ri. v e r sat ip^ \a$\& * simple 
grammar. 

The third new course, A 
Feminist Look at Women's 



Fiction, will examine the female 
experience as it is reflected in 
literature. The course will 
stimulate reading and discussion 
( in such topics W. growing up 
and growing old female, 
relationships with men, freedom, 
marriage, motherhood, love, 
among others. 

Other non-ciiUHt courses to 
be offered in the Spring semes tt\ 
include Principles oi 
Bookkeeping, beginner and 
refresher Shorthand and Typing 
Law for the Layman 
Fundamentals of Investments in 
stocks and Bonds, Income Taxes 
Preparation for the Real Estate 
Broker's Examination and 
Successful Real Estate Practice 
Personnel Management, an 
Effective Supervision, will alsi 
be given. 

Data Processing Courses will 
include Introduction to Data 
Processing, Busines 
Programming aAd Cobo 
Programming. 

In the area of .Language Art: 
and Humanities, courses will be 
offered in Conversational Italian, 
Effective Reading for Business 
and Pleasure, English fo 
Everyday Speech and Writing 
and Creative Writing. 

The fine arts courses offeree 
include Basic Drawing and ai 
Illustrated Couiffi- ptf Antiques 

In the area of psychology ami 
guidance, courses will be offered 
in Dynamics of Human Behavior 
and Career Guidance for the 
Mature Woman. 



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Page 16 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 4, 1973 



In Basketball 

North At Maiden, Quincy Hosts Chelsea 



North Quincy's basketball 
team, defending Greater Boston 
League champion, is off and 
running again and Tuesday 
played a vital game at Somerville 
seeking its third straight GBL 
win and fourth in a row overall. 

Friday the Raiders will play 
at Maiden and next Tuesday will 
host Quincy. 

Meanwhile, Quincy, which 
has played only one league game 
and won it at Maiden, hosted 
Revere Tuesday, will be home to 
Chelsea Friday and go to North 
Quincy Tuesday. 

Bob Nolan's North . quintet 
followed up an easy win over 
Chelsea with an impressive 73-55 
decision over Everett last week. 

Nine Raiders scored and 
Nolan was jubilant over "a great 
team effort". 

"Our defense was super and 
the shooting was excellent," 
Nolan said. "This was a real 
good wm but we have two tough 
games coming up with 
Somerville and Maiden and the 
game at Somerville is most 
important. Jf we are going 
anywhere we will have to win 
that one." 

North took a 1 2-5 first period 
lead at Everett, led, 29-22, at the 
half and opened up a big 51-34 
bulge in the third period. 

Jamie Doherty and Ken 
Masters had 19 points each and 
Peter Quinn added 11. 

Earlier in the week the 
Raiders made a fine showing in 
the holiday festival in Brockton. 

North dropped a 
disappointing 59-55 decision to 
previously winless New Bedford 
.in its first game but rebounded 
for a 77-72 win over defending 
state champion Lexington in the 
.... . . . 



consolation game. Brockton's 
host team won the tourney with 
a win over Lexington opening 
night and then defeating New 
Bedford in the title game. 

These games will not count in 
North's record but are 
considered important in Nolan's 
eyes. 

"This was real pressure 
basketball and many of our 
players had no tourney 
experience and these games will 
help them considerably," the 
Raider coach said. "Also playing 
two nights in a row helped 
because that is what the kids will 
do if they make the state 
tournament again." 

In the loss to New Bedford 
poor foul shooting was costly as 
the Raiders three times had 
one-and-one situations when the 
score was tied or North was 
down by a point. But they could 
get only a single point and 
wound up with just 19 for 31 
from the foul line. 

Doherty had 22 points and 
Marsters 13 to spark the North 
attack. 

The win over Lexington, the 
tourney's top-seeded team, 
healed North's wounded pride. 

"Our pride was hurt against 
New Bedford and we didn't play 
>thegl$?rg ofcb^;pe knew we 
could play but against Lexington 
we did what we expected and 
were able to beat their zone 
press. 

"We went into a man-to-man 
coverage, something we hadn't 
done for two years and it made 
the difference." 

Marsters led the way with 22 
points, Doherty had 20, Bob 
Morton 1 6 and Quinn 1 1 . 



8 Recreation Dept. Iff embers 
To Attend Training Program 



Eight staff members of the 
Quincy Park and Recreation 
Board will attend a four-part 
training program next month 
sponsored by Northeastern 
University and held at its Warren 
Center in Ashland. 

They are Bruce Knowles, 
Frank Grillo, Maureen Kelly, 
Dale Alongi, Cathy llacqua, Jean 
Riccuiti, Donna Lambert and 
Andrea Quinn. 

The program, entitled 
"Opening Ne\. Horizons in 



Recreation," was scheduled to 
open Dec. 16, but the opening 
session was postponed due to 
inclement weather. 

The sessions now are 
scheduled for Jan. 6, 13, 20 and 
27. 

The program includes new 
approaches to drama, movement 
and sound, arts and crafts, and 
innovative programming for 
elementary, junior high and 
senior high participants. 



oaooooo n o o oo o o onnuoo ooooocoo o ooo 

Health 
High-Lights 

By Jack Silvtrsttm 
a— ooooawaoooawo— i i n nn m i 

COMMON COLD DEBATE 





Recently, the big toe - a part 
of the anatomy which usually gets 
little attention in the headlines - 
became news in medical circles. 
Israeli researchers reported that 
they found a cure for the 
common cold by chilling the big 
toe with a refrigerant chemical. 
According to the doctors, the 
sudden chilling dries up the 
nostrils and cures colds. This 
method has not been tested here 
as yet. 

Unorthodox new "cures" for 
the common cold have popped up 
throughout the ages. Some have 
beer on the off-beat side, such as 
wearing garlic around the neck, 
sniffing smelling salts and 
standing on one's head. 

One of the most controversial 
cold cures in recent years is the 
claim by Nobel Laureate Dr. 



Linus Pauling that large doses of 
vitamin C can prevent and cure 
the common cold. Other studies 
have found Dr. Pauling's theory 
debatable and have questioned 
the preventative or therapeutic 
effectiveness of vitamin C. The 
debate rages on - and so does the 
common cold. 

• * • 



This information has been 
brought to you as a public service 
by NABORHOOD PHARMACY, 
406 Hancock St, No. Quincy, 
where you can always count on 
friendly, professional service. 
Hospital equipment and supplies 
for rent or sale. Let us keep your 
prescription tax and insurance 
records. Phone: 773-6426. 



-«- 




LAKERS* CHEERLEADERS at St John's School are, from left, Joann Walsh, Capt. Allison Fay, 
Jacqueline MaHett, Laura Harris, Co Capt. Theresa McRudin, Co Capt. Moreen O'Malley and Lisa 
AfRvtti. < 

[Quincy Sun Photo] 

Farina Edges Quincy Sun 



• ■ 



To Take Top Baniam 

Bantam 



Farina Kitchens edged the 
Quincy Sun, 3-2, on goals by 
Dave Peters, John Fitzgerald and 
Tom Wilkinson Saturday [Dec. 
30] to take over first place in 
the Quincy Youth Hockey 
Bantam House League. 

Blackwood Pharmacy handed 
Bersani Brothers its first defeat, 
5-2, as Paul Hurley collected two 
goals and Rich Danner, Dennis 
Rush and Mitchell got one 
apiece. Jerry Smith and John 
Andrews had the Bersani goals. 

Derringer's and Johnson's 



Standings 



w 



T Pts. 



Farina 

Blackwood 

Bersani 

Johnson's 

Derringer's 

Quincy Sun 



Spot 



Motor Parts played to a 2-2 tie 
with Mark Richardi and Jackie 



Cavanaugh scoring for 
Derringer's and Mike McGrath 
and John Cooney for Johnson's. 
Bantam Standings 



Next Saturday [Jan. 6] at 
Hingham Arena. 

Derringer's vs Quincy Sun, 7 
a.m., Rink A. 

Bersani vs. Johnson's, 7:15 
a.m., Rink C. 

Blackwood vs. Farina, 8: IS 
a.m., Rink A. 



In [rack 

North, Quincy In GBL Title Fight 



The Greater Boston League, 

which by its performances this 

year shapes up as one of the 

strongest schoolboy track 

leagues in the state, is up for 

grabs. 

And, following last 

Saturday's SSVi-SOft win over 

Chelsea, North Quincy is in the 

thick of the title fight. 

Thanks to Medford's 44-42 

win over previously unbeaten 

Revere, Revere and Somerville 

are tied for the lead with 3-1 

records and North is right 

behind with a 2-1 mark. Quincy 

also is in the chase with a 1-2 

mark. 

There are no league meets 

this week with the annual State 

Coaches Meet Friday at 

Northeastern University starting 

at 4:30. Both Quincy and North 

Quincy will have several entries 

in this meet. The next set of 

league meets will be Jan. 13 at 

Medford with Quincy meeting 

Chelsea and North facing 

Medford. 

In last week's win over 

stubborn Chelsea, in which 

North scored 14 points in the 

last two events, Lee Watkins 

won the 50-yarddashin 5:08 and 

ran the first leg for the winning 



relay team which turned in a 

brilliant time of t :5 1 .1 just after 

Medford had nipped Revere with 

a 2:51.8 in the relav. 

Jack Reynolds won the 

hurdles in 6:02, an excellent 

effort, Jack Pomerole won the 

300 in 35.9, his best time, 

Sophomore Mark Canavan won 

his second straight 600 and Burt 

Bray remained unbeaten" in the 

shot put with his third straight 

win. Bob McCormack was 

nipped by two feet in the mile 

despite a fine 4: 42.8. \^ 

The final two events were the 

dash and relay and North swept 

the dash with Dave Ashmanskas 

and Paul Doherty finishing 

behind Watkins and then the 

relay team of Watkins, 

McCormack, Pomerole and 

Reynolds won. 

Earlier in the week Bob 
Gentry's Raiders were edged by 
Revere, 45-41, as the Patriots 
repeated their earlier 
performance against Quincy in 
the high jump and hurdles. 

Despite a 6-foot jump, North 
had to be satisfied with a third 
place as Revere's Kerry Leppo 
won. In the Quincy meet the 
Presidents' ace, John Johnson, 
also jumped six feet but was 



only third as Leppo won. In the 
hurdles Leppo also won, as he 
had against Quincy. 

North's McCormack won the 
mile, Canavan the 600, Pomerole 
the 300 and Bray the shot put. 
The relay team of Canavan, 
McCormack, Pomerole and 
Reynolds also won to stay 
unbeaten. 

Tom Hall's Quincy team, 
which was idle last Saturday, 
had lost earlier in the week to 
Somerville, 49-37. 

Ray Lawyer remained 
unbeaten in the 50-yard dash, 
Johnson won the high jump and 
placed second in the hurdles, 
Mark MacLeod won the 600 in 
the league's best time of the 
year, 1:22, and Marty Swirko 
stayed unbeaten in the 1000. 
Two weeks ago he had turned in 
the league's best time in this 
event. — 

The relay team of Pete 
Ramponi, Steve Oriola, Swirko 
and MacLeod won, thanks to a 
fine anchor leg by MacLeod. He 
started the final leg-trailing by 
10 yards but won by 15. 

-TOM SULLIVAN 





SU WASHINGTON ST. 



Thursday, January 4, 1973 Quincy Sun Page 17 



In GBL Hockey 

And Down Season For Quincy, North 



Up 



By TOM SULLIVAN 

This has been an up and 
down season for the Quincy and 
North Quincy hockey teams, 
each usually following up a fine 
performance with an extremely 
disappointing effort. 

Both coaches hoped that last 
Friday's tremendous 
performances would be repeated 
last night when Quincy faced 
Somerville and North met 
defending Greater Boston 
League champion Revere at 
Boston Arena. 

Friday night Quincy will face 
Maiden at 6:30 and North, will 
take on Medford at 9. Monday 
night it will be North vs. 
Somerville at 6:30 and next 
Wednesday it will be Quincy vs. 
Revere at 6:30. 

Last Friday both clubs 
rebounded from bitterly 
disappointing efforts to turn in 
their finest two-way games of 
the year. 

Quincy Coach Bob Sylvia 
shuffled his lines in an effort to 
bolster the Presidents' weak 
attack and the changes paid off 
handsomely as Quincy bombed 
Chelsea, 7-0. 

"We needed more balance 
between our lines in scoring," 
Sylvia said. "We shifted centers 
Ted Wiedemann and Al 
Lancione. It worked because 
both those lines did some good 
scoring." 

Paul Campbell had a great 
day with four goals, scoring the 
first and winning goal in tne 
opening period and following up 
with one in the second period 
and two in the final session. 

After only a 1-0 first period 
lead, the Presidents scored three 
times in each of the next two 
periods. Bob Boyle and 
Wiedemann scored in the middle 
period while Chuck Crews 
scored in the finale. 

"The thing we did well today 
was head the puck up ice," 
Sylvia continued. "We were 
bringing the puck into the 
offensive zone well and had time 
to set up. 

"Everyone is capable of 
beating everyone else in this 
♦league and if we can come up 
with some consistent 
performances we could get some 
help from the other teams and 
move up in the standings." 

Following that impressive win 
the Presidents were 2-2-1 in the 
GBL. 

North Coach Ron Erikson 
was delighted with the Raiders' 
5-2 win over Everett. 



"We haven't scored like this 
in two years," Erikson said. "We 
needed a win like this because 
we now face two tough teams in 
Revere and Medford. We have a 
young team that has trouble 
getting up for games but today 
they came here really ready to 
play and showed the kind of 
hockey they are capable of." 

Co-Captain Steve MacKay 
scored the hat trick to spark the 
big win. His first goal in the 
opening period tied the score 
after Everett had scored the 
game's first eoal. 

In the second period Jim 
Mullaney put North ahead, 2-1, 
and after Everett's second score, 
Mullaney scored again and North 
was ahead to stay. 

MacKay scored his second 
and third goals in the final 
period. 

"MacKay played a strong 
game but this was a team effort 
because everyone got into the 
game and kept the enthusiasm 
alive for the whole three 
periods," Erikson explained. 
"We had a chance to play 
everyone and this is the kind of 
experience we need. We hoped 
for more aggressiveness and we 
got it today." 

Quincy let Everett jump away 
to a 2-0 lead and bowed, 4-1, 
with Campbell scoring the 
Presidents' only goal in the 
second period. 

"There is something wrong 
that I can't put my finger on," 
Sylvia said. "The kids work hard 
in practice in scrimmages and 
look good. But once the real 
thing starts, they tighten up or 
something. I feel we have a good 
club but I question whether the 
kids believe in themselves." 

North saw winless Chelsea 
jump awav to a 4-0 lead, then 
outplayedj the Red Devils but 
lost, 5-4, in a game which. 
Erikson said "disgusted" him. 

"I'm disappointed and 
disgusted and 1 hope the boys 
are," he said. "1 obviously had 
the team over-rated at the start 
of the season. There will be 
some changes made and I just 
hope the mental attitude of the 
players will improve." 

After Chelsea scored three 
first period goals and another at 
the start of the second to make ( 
it 4-0, Ken Graham Scored the 
first of his two goals and then 
quickly added his second. 

Chelsea scored the clincher 
early in the final period and then 
Mullaney and MacKay scored for 
North to cut the gap to 5-4, the 
final score. 




LEAGUE LEADERS - Quincy Youth Hockey Bantam "B" team tops its league with a 12 11 record. 
Front row from left are, Jim Shea, Mark Kelly, Paul Higgins, Jack Cronin, Jimmy McConville, Mike 
Smith, Jeff Gavin and Bill Doherty. Second row, Jeff Nord, Dennis Bertoni. Frank Pen zo, Dave Perrios, 
Matt Dillon, Gerry Cronin, Rick Carnoli, Dave Previte and Rick Troy. Back row. Assistant Coach Hank 
Previte, Assistant Coach Jim Shea and Coach Bob Watts. 

[Quincy Sun Photo] 






Quincy Youth Hockey 

Mife'A'S' Defeat Duxbury, 7-2 



The Quincy Youth Hockey 
Mite "A" team emerged from 
Sunday's games with three 
points on a 7-2 victory over 
Duxbury and a 7-7 tie with 
Bridgewater. 

Johnny Cummings and Kevin 
Craig had two goals each against 
Duxbury while Richie Milano, 
Richie Stevens and Tommy 
Murphy had one apiece. Craig 
and Stevens scored twice against 
Bridgewater and Murphy, 
Cummings and Paul McCabe 
each had one. 

The Mite "B" team bowed 
twice, once to Duxbury by a 2-0 



score and then to the Abington 
Terriers, 3-2, with goals coming 
from Jimmy Seymour and Rick 
Reardon. 

The Squirt "A" team chalked 
up wins over Bridgewater, 3-0, 
and Holbrook, 5-0, and lost to 
Somerville, 4-2. Scorers against 
Bridgewater were Robbie Craig, 
John Furey and Mark Veasey; 

a ga i as t . rLp hfcjf ookj* <S W^pi 
Richardson (2), Craig, Furey 
and Tommy Gerry; and against 
Somerville, Furey and Gerry. 

The Squirt "B" team bowed 
to the Abington Beavers, 3-1, 
and then blanked the Abington 



Comets, 4-0. Mark Boussy got 
the only goal against the Beavers 
while Joe Rathgeb, Mike Panico, 
Tommy Rocke and Boussy 
tallied in the Comets game. 

The Bantam "A" team lost to 
Canton, 2-1, with the lone goal 
by Steve Cronin, and then edged 
Brockton, 4-3, on scores by 
Jackie McHugh, Johnny 
Mitchell, JohoayW'JWlB "*9 
Cronin. 

In Squirt House League play, 
Hannon Tire whipped Quincy 
Professional Building, 3-0, on 
goals by Mike Cronin, Gregory 
Freeman and Brian Ofria. 



Reds Roll Along In St. Joseph's Hockey 



In St. Joseph's Hockey 
League action last week at Shea 
rink, the Red team remained 
unbeaten with a 9-3 win over the 
Golds. 

Scoring for the Reds were 
Mike McNally with two goals 
and three assists, Lloyd Allen 
with two goals and four assists, 



Dick Brunstrum with two goals 
and three assists, Hal McLarnori 
with a goal and two assists, John 
Duffy and Paul Galligari with f 
goal apiece. 

In the second game the Blues 
defeated the Greens, 5-3. 

Scoring for the Blues were 
Mark Walker with two goals arid 



an assist, Paul Veneziano with a 
goal and two assists, Dick 
Kellyard and Paul Chelta with i 
goal apiece. 

Green scorers were Bob 
DeCristofaro with two goals and 
Bob Panora with one. 

This week the Blues meet the 
Golds and Reds face the Greens. 




FROM PEE-WEE 
TO PROFESSIONAL 




COOPER 
NORTHLAND - KOHO 









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FREE PARKING 

OPEN EVERY EVE. 
TILL 9 P.M. 



-4 



Page 18 Quincy Suit Thursday, January 4, 1973 



vie 



Quincy Twins In Mitchum Mo 
'The Friends Of Eddie Coyle 9 



Thirty-five would-be movie 
actors, hopeful of a part in a 
/ movie being filmed throughout 
the Boston - South Shore area, 
[The Friends of Eddie Coyle, 
starring Robert Mitchum] 
recently zeroed in on the casting 
office of Talents Unlimited on 
Boylston Street in Boston. 

The 35 were from Carole 
McCole's Model Agency and 
were interviewed by 
Paramount's casting director, 
Vic Ramos, for "The Friends of 
Eddie Coyle" starring Robert 
Mitchum. 

The Carole McCole Agency, 
located in Weymouth, is 
associated with Talents 
Unlimited. 

As of this date, six of the 35 
have been used in the filming, 
Cathy Bailey and Linda Andrews 
of Abington, Donna and Debbie 



DeBaYtolo, identical twins, from 
Quincy, Martha Joyce Manley of 
Braintree and Kevin Manning of 
Stoughton. All of these with the 
exception of Kevin Manning are 
students at Carole McCole's 
Modeling School. 

Carole and her Abington 
School director, Sue Riordan 
visited the filming of the 
bowling alley scene on Morrissey 
Boulevard last week. Three of 
her girls were being used in the 
segment. 

She said she found Robert 
Mitchum to be "a regular guy". 
He posed, uncomplaining and 
gave out autographs to all who 
asked in great humor. "He 
seemed to thoroughly enjoy 
himself throughout the filming 
and the long waits while the 
scenes were set up," noted 



Carole. "He talked and joked 
and listened while we 
thoroughly enjoyed ourselves." 

The book, "The Friends of 
Eddie Coyle" was written by 
George V. Higgins of Hingham. 
Mr. Higgins was born and raised 
in Rockland where his father, 
John Higgins, was principal of 
Rockland High School. His 
mother still teaches in the 
Rockland School system. 

George is an assistant U.S. 
Attorney in Boston. 

Along with supplying people 
for the current film, Carole 
McCole's models have appeared 
in the recent TV commercial for 
the South Shore Plaza's Italian 
Festival. 

With two schools, one in 
Abington and headquarters in 
Weymouth, Carole says she will 
never run out of talent to supply 
the needs of the media. 



Anthony Petrocca *First Assistant District Attorney 



Dist. Atty. George G. Burke 
announces the appointment of 
Anthony T. Petrocca of 
Medfield as first assistant district 
attorney for the Norfolk 
District'. 

Petrocca has been an 
Assistant District Attorney in 
Burke's office since January, 
1968. He has handled many of 
the more serious felony trials. 

Prior to joining Burke's staff, 
Petrocca served as town counsel 



for Millis for nine years. He is a 
graduate of Suffolk University 
Law School, Class of 1951 and 
became a member of the 
Massachusetts Bar in November 
of the same year. He also has 
attended graduate courses in 
Municipal Law and Criminal 

Law. 

Petrocca is a member of the 
Massachusetts Bar Association, 
American Trial Lawyers 
Association, Massachusetts Trial 
Lawyers Association, Justinian 



Law Society, Norfolk County 
Bar Association, Western 
Norfolk Bar Association, 
American Judicature Society 
and the American Legion - Millis 
Post 208. He is currently a 
lecturer of Criminal Law, Police 
Science Institute at Dean Junior 
College. 

Petrocca and his wife, the 
former Dorothy A. Wood live 
with their two daughters Lisa 
and Dorothy at 1 1 Cedar Lane, 
Medfield. 



Jane Granstrom Children f s Services Supervisor 



Warren E. Watson, Director 
of the Thomas Crane Public 
Library, announces the 
appointment of Miss Jane 
Granstrom to the position of 
Supervisor of Children's 
Services, formerly held by Mrs. 
Frances C. Hines. 

Miss Granstrom is a graduate 
of Curry College and received 
her Master's degree in Library 
Science from the University of 
Rhode Island. Before coming to 



Quincy she was Supervisor of 
Children's Services at the 
Newton Free Library and prior 
to that was Children's Librarian 
at the Parlin Memorial Library, 
Everett. 

She is Chairman of the New 
England Round Table of 
Children's Librarians. She is also 
a reviewer for the Eastern 
Massachusetts Children's Book 
Review Committee and the 



Children's Science Book Review 
Committee [publication 
APPRAISAL!. 

She is also a contributor to 
The Horn Book Magazine. 
Professional memberships 
include American Library 
Association, New England 
Library Association and the 
Massachusetts Library 
Association. She began her 
duties on Oct. 30. 



Start this 

One off 
Right! 

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PER YEAR 





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THE QUINCY SUN 

1101 Heececk Strttt 
QUINCY, MASS. 0*169 



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LEGAL NOTICES 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

To RUSSELL S. GRONDIN of 
Braintree in the County of Norfolk, 
and to all persons interested in a 
petition for adoption of STEPHEN 
RUSSELL GRONDIN of Quincy in 
said County. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court by FREDERICK A. 
MILLER and DIANE MARIE 
MILLER his wife, of Quincy in said 
County, praying for leave to adopt 
said STEPHEN RUSSELL 
GRONDIN formerly a child of said 
Russell S. Grondin and Diane Marie 
Grondin his wife, now Diane Marie 
Miller and that the name of said child 
be changed to Stephen Russell Miller. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the seventh day of February, 1973, 
the return day of this citation. 

Witness, J. JOHN FOX, Esquire, 
First Judge of said Court, this 
twentieth day of December 1972. 

Bennett V. McLaughlin, 
Register. 
1/4-11-18/73 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of GRACE E. JACOBS late of 
Quincy in said County, deceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court praying that WALTER J. 
JACOBS and GRACE L. BLAIKIE, 
both of Quincy, in the County of 
Norfolk be appointed 
co-administrators of said estate 
without giving a surety on their 
bonds. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the thirty-first day of January 1973, 
the return day of this citation. 

Witness J. JOHN FOX, Esquire, 
First Judge of said Court, this 
twenty-eighth day of December 
1972. 

. Bennett V. McLaughlin, 
Register. 
1/4-11-18/73 



ANNUAL MEETING 

The Annual Meeting of the Members 
of Colonial Federal Savings and Loan 
Association will be held on 
Wednesday, January 17, 1973 at 
4:30 P.M. at the office of the 
Association, 15 Beach Street, in that 
part of Quincy, Massachusetts called 
Wollastoi;, for the election of 
directors, for receiving the reports of 
the officers and for the transaction of 
any business that legally may come 
before the meeting. 

Colonial Federal Savings and Loan 
Association of Quincy 



1/4-11/73 



Roy L. Sidelinger 
Secretary 



WOODWARD'S 

EXPERT 

FRONT END 

WORK 

AND 

ALIGNMENT 

mimdMntiMdnr 



1 



TUENME: 773-1280 



LEGAL NOTICES 



• COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

To the Attorney General of the 
United States, Office of Alien 
Property, if necessary, and to all 
persons interested in the trust estate 
under the will of HARRIET E. 
DOUGLAS late of Quincy in said 
County, deceased, for the benefit of 
RALPH DOLLIVER, FRANCES 
WARRINER and others. 

The trustee of said estate has 
presented to said Court for allowance 
its thirteenth to fifteenth accounts, 
inclusive. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the thirty-first day of January, 1973, 
the return day of this citation. 

Witness, J. JOHN FOX, Esquire, 
First Judge of said Court, this 
twentieth day of December 1972. 

Bennett V. McLaughlin, 
Register. 
1/4-11-18/73 



CITY OF QUINCY 

INVITATION FOR BIDS 

Sealed proposals for the 
construction of the Physical 
Education and Administration 
Offices Building, Quincy Public 
Schools, will be received at the office 
of James J. Ricciuti, commissioner of 
Public Works, Public Works 
Administration Building, SS Sea 
Street, Quincy, Massachusetts until 
12:00 Noon, E.S.T., Monday, 
January 22, 1973 and then publicly 
. opened and read aloud. 

Sub-bids for Roofing & Flashing; 
Masonry; Waterproofing and 
Caulking; Miscellaneous and 
Ornamental Iron; Metal Windows; 
Glass & Glazing; Partition Systems, 
Lath & Plaster; Ceramic Tile; 
Acoustical Ceilings; Floor Covering; 
Elevator; Painting; Refrigeration; 
HVAC, Plumbing & Electrical; 
Plumbing; Heating; Air Conditioning 
& Ventilation: Electrical, shall be 
filed at the office of James J. 
Ricciuti, Commissioner of Public 
Works, Public Works Administration 
Building, 55 Sea Street, Quincy, 
Massachusetts before 2:00 P.M., 
E.S.T., Tuesday, January 16, 1973, 
and then publicly opened and read 
aloud. 

Bidding documents may be 
obtained at the office of Joseph A. 
Donahue Associates, Architects, 
Monroe Building, 1245 Hancock 
Street, Quincy, Massachusetts on or 
after January 8, 1973 by depositing a 
certified check in the sum of one 
hundred [$100.00] dollars,' payable 
to the City of Quincy, for each set of 
documents. The full amount of the 
plan deposit will be refunded to all 
bidders returning plans and 
specifications in good condition 
within ten [10] days after the date 
of General Bid opening. 

Bids for the project are subject to 
the provisions of Sections 44 A to 
44 L, inclusive, Chapter 149, G.L. 
[Ter.Ed.) and Section 39M, Chapter 
30, of the General Laws, as amended. 
Bid Security: Each General Bid 
shall be accompanied by cash or a 
Certified Check on, or a Treasurer's 
or Cashier's Check, issued by a 
responsible bank or trust company, 
payable to the City of Quincy in the 
amount of Fifty Thousand Dollars, 
[$50,000]. Sub-bids must be 
accompanied by a similar form of Bid 
Security in the amount stipulated in 
Information To Bidders. No other 
form of security will be accepted. 

Attention is also called to the 
minimum wage rates to be paid on 
the work as determined by the 
Commissioner of Labor and 
Industries under the provisions of the 
General Laws, Chapter 149, Sections 
26 to 27D, inclusive, as amended. 

The right is reserved to waive any 
informalities or to reject any or all 
bids, if it be in the public interest to 
do so. 

City of Quincy, Massachusetts 
James J. Ricciuti 
Commissioner of Public Works 
1/4/73 



MUSCULAR 
OYSTROPHY 



, 



471 
$100 



GOCMSS/f/i 



Thursday, January 4, 1973 Quincy Sun Page 19 



FQR7H£AC7iON 
YOU WANT 



LEGAL NOTICES 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

To the Treasurer and Receiver 
General of said Commonwealth, and 
to all persons interested in the estate 
of ROGER B. CARON late of 
Quincy in said County, deceased, 
intestate. And to the Attorney 
General of the United States, Office 
of Alien Property, if necessary. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for license to sell at 
private sale, certain real estate of said 
deceased situated in said Quincy, in 
accordance with the offer set forth in 
said petition. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Quincy 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the tenth day of January 1973, the 
return day of this citation. 

Witness, J. JOHN FOX, Esquire, 
First Judge of said Court, this 
eleventh day of December 1972. 

Bennett V. McLaughlin, 
Register. 
12/21-28 1/4/73 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

To the Treasurer and Receiver 
General of said Commonwealth, and 
to all persons interested in the estate 
of JOHN J. COSTELLO late of 
Quincy in said County, deceased. 
And to true Attorney General of the 
United States, Office of Alien 
Property, if necessary. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court, praying that GEORGE F. 
HJMMEL of Braintree in said County 
of Norfolk, public administrator, be 
appointed administrator of said 
estate. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the seventeenth day of January 1973, 
the return day of this citation. 

Witness, J. JOHN FOX, Esquire, 
First Judge of said Court, this twelfth 
day of December 1972. 

Bennett V. McLaughlin, 
Register. 
12/28/72 1/4-11/73 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of DOROTHY E. HAYDEN, 
also known as DOROTHY F. 
HAYDEN late of Quincy in said 
County, deceased. And to the 
Attorney General of the United 
States, Office of Alien Property, if 
necessary. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by RALPH S. 
HAYDEN of Quincy in the County 
of Norfolk praying that he be 
appointed executor thereof without 
giving a surety on his bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Quincy 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the tenth day of January 1973, the 
return day of this citation. 

Witness, J. JOHN FOX, Esquire, 
First Judge of said Court, this 
eleventh day of December 1972. 

Bennett V. McLaughlin, 
Register. 
12/21-28 1/4/73 



SHAREHOLDERS 
MEETING 

A meeting of the Shareholder! of the 
Shipbuilders Co-operative Bank will 
be held on Monday, January 22, 
1973, at 4:30 P.M. at the bank's 
office, 1 Granite Street, Quincy, for 
the purpose of electing directors, a 
shareholder's clerk and to act on any 
other business requiring the attention 
of the shareholders. 

Francis X. McCauley 
Shareholders' Clerk 
1/4/73 



«•#» 



Mti foi 




MAIL TO: QUINCY SUN 1604 Hancock St, Quincy 02169 
WANT ADS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE...cuh mutt accompany order. 
Enclosed it, for the following ad to 



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$2.25 for one week, up to 20 words, St* each additional word. 
$2.00 per week, up tO 20 words for three or more insertions of 
the tame ad. 

No refund will be made at this contract rate in the event of 
cancellation. 

Deadline: Friday 5 P.M. for the following weeks publication. 

Please include your phone number in ad. 



waanp" -^p 



SNOW PLOWING 

SNOW PLOWING at 
reasonable rates. Quincy 
Area. Call 479-7015. 1/4 



MISCFXLANEOUS 



SERVICES 



SERVICES 



LOST PASSBOOK 



Old Scale, Safe, Comb. 


Alum. 


Windows, Complete Bed, Old 


Chairs, Books 


and 


Miscellaneous articles, 


Chain 


Fall & Copper 


Pipe. 


773-9223. 


1/4 



The following Passbook No. 8931-9 
has been lost, destroyed or stolen and 
application for payment has been 
made in accordance with Section 20, 
Chapter 167, General Laws. The 
finder will please return to the 
Granite Coop Bank, 1 20 Granite St., 
Quincy. 
12/28/72 1/4/73 



MATTRESSES 




MATTRESSES-lmmed. 
Delivery - Can you use 
exceptionally good buys 
on king, queen, full or 
twin mattresses, beds, 
trundles, bunks at 
discount. Brand names, 
S e a ly , Eclipse, 
Slumberland, Engiander, 
etc.; Bedding still our only 
business for over 18 years., 
open eves.. Siesta Sleep 
Shops, 221 Parkingway, 
Quincy (next to 
Raymonds) . 

F. 



FLOORS & WALLS 

Linoleum, ceramic tile, formic*, sold A installed. Hardwood 
floors laid, sanded and finished. Many specials in our store. 
Wall Tie, carpeting, Armstrong floor coverings of all types 
at reduced prices. 

ART FLOOR COMPANY 

1123 Blue Hills Avenue, Dorchester 

TA 5-6179 

Open 8:00 5:00 Daily 
Closed Sat. 



BOATS 



HALLS FOR HIRE 



Clearance prices on all 


boats. Storage & 


reconditioning of motors 


for winter. President 


Marine, 666 Southern 


Artery, Quincy. 773-5058. 


... TF 



AIR CONDITIONED HALL - 

FOR HIRE. No. Quincy K. of 
C. Building, 5 Hollis Ave. For 
information please call 
328-5158^28 0087328 9822. 



CARPET CLEANING 



INSURANCE 



Newsboys 

(And, Newsgirh, too) 

WANTED 



G.M. CARPET CO. 

Expert on the spot new 
steam cleaning method. Free 
Estimates. 328-6554 



CARPENTRY 



If you have a basic 
homeowners policy for 
$20,000 and are paying 
more than $75.00 a year 
call 282-4412 at orce. 
Rutftein Insurance 
Age i ;cy . 




1601 Hancock St. 

471-3100 



Licensed builder, 26 yean 
experience. Repairs, 

remodeling ft additions. No 
job too small. Free estimates. 
Charles jTross. 479-37S5. 



KEYS MADE 



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DOYLE * LONG 

Fuel Oil 

ft . 
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Page 20 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 4, T973 



Affluent Society Causes Big Solid Waste Problem Says McDonald 



Disposal of solid wastes 
generated in increasing amounts 
by an affluent society is the 
biggest operational problem 
facing municipal government 
today, says Norfolk County 
Commissioner George B. 
McDonald of Quincy. 

And the logical unit of 
government to handle the 
problem is the county, 
McDonald told a meeting of the 
Southeastern Association of 



Boards of Health at the Holiday 
Inn in Randolph recently. 

The county, he said, is "a 
governmental subdivision firmly 
established and unlikely to be 
substantially modified in the 
foreseeable future by various 
proposals to subdivide the 
Commonwealth along other 
lines. 

"At least, the very real 
problem of solid waste disposal 
could not be delayed while 



anticipating possible changes. In 
any event, a well-planned system 



along county lines could easily 
be merged in a state 



management plan should, it 
evolved in the future." 



be 



Brownell Opposes MBTA Parking Fee Increase 



Rep. Thomas F. Brownell has 
registered "unequivocal 
opposition" to a suggested 
increase in parking fees for the 
Quincy Center MBTA garage. 

Brownell said he was 
informed that the MBTA was 
considering an increase in fees 



from 50 to 75 cents per day. 

In a letter to MBTA General 
Manager Joseph C. Kelley, he 
said "Quincy residents have 
already experienced an 
unprecedented tax increase this 
year. 



"An increase in MBTA fees 
only adds to the heavy financial 
burdens they are now carrying. 
It is my hope that you will seek 
out feelings in the community 
before you decide to increase 
MBTA costs," he said. 



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Vol. 5 No. 17 



Thursday, January 11,1 973 



2<rt*c9'4 Oetm TVtetlf ftemijtojU* 






o 

H- 



Photos Of Quincy High School Band In Dallas 

(Other Photos On Back Page) 




QUINCY BAND and others making trip to Dallas for Cotton Bowl Parade, pose with 
"City of Presidents" banner before boarding airliner at Logan Airport. Band and 
banner were seen on national television. 




WHILE PAUL CHRISTIAN catches a nap on flight to Dallas, colleagues gather to 
shoot the breeze. Among them, Phil Girard, Allan Michaud, Bruce Ogden, Joseph 
Fernandez, Susan White, Valarie Voegtlin. 




COWBOY HATTED Michael Cahill, Quincy high school band director, gives 
instructions during rehearsal to color guard members Debbie Spillane, Linda Younie, 
Judy Antonellis, Ann Cullen and Maureen McCarthy. 



liiiiSHHB!!!>:ii 

!8|S£ 




i I l l I » 11 
. i •■ * I I" 

.ii-ii ! f » 




DOWN DALLAS STREET smartly steps Quincy High School band in New Year's Day 
Cotton Bowl Parade. 




RODEO in Mansfield, Tex. is enjoyed by Susan White, Valarie Voegtlin, Glenn Davis, 
Doug King, Paul Farmer, Jeff Dill, Lisa Krantzberg, Dave Rosen and Judy Antonellis. 




SIGHT Sl'EING included a visit to Texas Hall of State. Quincy tourists here are Judy 
Antonellis, Dave Rosen, Lisa Krantzberg, Arlene McKeeman and Paul Farmer. 



Page 2 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 11, 1973 



S, Quincy MBTA Exhibit At City Hall 



MBTA General Manager 
Joseph C. Kelly/announced that 
an exhibit of maps and drawings 
of the proposed extension of the 
South Shore Line from Quincy 
Center to South Quincy is now 
available for public viewing at 
the Quincy City Council 
Chambers. 

The exhibit, suggested by 
Councillor Theophilus 
McLelland, will remain on 
display until a second public 
informational meeting, similar to 
the first meeting and discussion 
Dec. 18, is held. J he date tor the 



second meeting has not yet been 
set. 

To be available during the 
exhibit are brochures that 
briefly describe the MBTA's 
preliminary planning for the 
extension and South Quincy 
Station and the proposals of the 
Massachusetts DPW for the 
access ramps to the station from 
Rtes 3 and 128, the rerouting 
arrangements for Centre and 
Penn Sts., and a 1,500-2,000 car ' 
parking garage. 

Kelly said the MBTA is 
exhibiting the preliminary plans 



and drawings prior to holding a 
second public informational 
meeting so that all concerned 
public officials and citizens will 
have a better understanding of 
the proposed South Quincy 
Extension Project. 

An official public hearing, 
required by the U.S. Department 
of Transportation, will be held 
sometime in the late winter or 
early spring in connection with 
filing an application for a federal 
capital facilities grant for the 
project, Kelly said. 



Lawrence Perette President 
Quincy Municipal Credit Union 



Lawrence Perette has 
assumed office as president of 
the Quincy Municipal Credit 
L'nion. 

Other new elected officers of 
the organization are: Harold 
Carroll, vice president; Patrick 
Sullivan, treasurer and John E. 
•'ireen, clerk of the corporation. 

Five members were also 
elected to the Board of 
Directors: Thomas Maloney. 
Patrick Sullivan, Rocco Marella, 
William Phelan and Richard 
Koch. 



The Quincy Municipal Credit 
Union now located at 1120 
Hancock St., Quincy Center, was 
organized by members of the 
Quincy Fire Department in 
1937. i n car |y 1951 because of 

its successful growth the 
members ot the credit union 
elected to have it expanded so 
that membership was opened to 
all other city departments. There 
are now 3,033 members. 

Through the years there has 
been continuous financial 
growth with current assets of 



more than $3,000,000. Among 
the services provided by the 
credit union in addition to 
interest on deposits, are new and 
used automobile loans, home 
repair loans, and personal loans. 

Perette said, "The Quincy 
Municipal Credit Union looks 
forward to 1973 as being 
another successful year of 
progress and every effort will be 
made to provide the best of 
services for the financial needs 
of our members." 



Schools To Help Parents Understand Offspring 



The Social Health 
Department of the Quincy 
Public Schools is starting a 
program to help parents 
understand their often 
iterlnf. offspring. 



The first in a series of night 
classes for adults dealing with 
problems of adolescents will be 
held Wednesday, Jan. 17, at 
7:30 p.m. in the English 
Department Resource Center in 



Quincy High School. 

The 10-session course will 
continue through March 28 
under the direction of John W. 
Mahoney, social health 
coordinator. 



Senior Citizens To See Ice Follies Matinee Feb. 21 



The Quincy Park-Recreation 
Board announces that a Senior 
Citizens trip to the Boston 
Garden has been scheduled for 
Thursday, Feb. 2 1 , to see a 1 :30 
matinee performance of the Ice 
Follies. 

Charles L. Alongi Jr., 
assistant director of recreation 



said a limited number of 
reserved ($4.50) seats at the 
Garden will be issued on a first 
come first serve basis for the 
reduced price of $3.50. Tickets 
are now on sale in the 
Recreation Office located on the 
second floor in the John F. 
Kennedy Health Center. 

Free bus transportation will 



be provided from the regular 
nine locations. 

The event is for all Senior 
Citizens* of Quincy 60 years of 
age and over. 

The Recreation Office will be 
open Monday through Friday 
from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. No 
telephone reservation will be 
accepted. 




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Cambridge Woman Gets 
Principal Planner Post 



Miss Nancy Cynamon, 29, of 
Cambridge has been named to 
the $14,300 post of Principal 
Planner by Mayor Walter J. 
Hannon. Effective Jan. 22. 

Her appointment was 
recommended by Geoffrey 
Davidson, Director Planning, 
Programming and Development 
for the City of Quiflcy. 

The post, Davidson noted, is 
established under and will be 
completely financed by the 
Federal 701 planning program. 

"There will be no cost to the 
city," he said. 

Davidson said Miss Cynamon 



will bring both urban design and 
physical design strength to the 
Planning Department staff and 
will be an asset working with 
community groups. 

She has a master's degree in 
city planning from the graduate 
School of Design at Harvard 
University and has had 
experience in the field of 
professional planning since 
1969. 

She currently is working on a 
research project as an 
independent consultant. Prior to 
that she was with Educational 
Planning Associates of Boston. 



Expert To Help Form Chamber 
Policy On S. Quincy MBTA 



Charles D. Baker III, a former 
assistant secretary of 
transportation, has been named 
to a task force to develop the 
South Shore Chamber of 
Commerce policy on the 
proposed South Quincy 
extension of the MBTA. 

Baker, who is president of 
Harbridge House, Inc., a 
Boston-based management 
consulting firm, was in charge of 
policy and international affairs 
for the Department of 
Transportation. He left the post 
nine months ago. 

The newly created task force 
has been designated to help the 



Chamber probe the impact of 
the proposal to extend the 
MBTA to the Southeast 
Expressway by way of South 
Quincy. The Chamber generally 
favors the extension. 

"Baker has an international 
reputation as an expert in 
transportation matters," said 
Chamber President John Blake, 
"and we believe that his counsel 
will help us develop a thoughtful 
analysis and policy relating to 
this rapid transit proposal." 

Baker said additional task 
force members will be named 
within 10 days. 



Marshall Appointed House 
Assistant Majority Leader 



Rep. Clifford H. Marshall 
[D-Quincy] has been appointed 
to the powerful House Rules 
Committee, a post that carries 
with it the title of assistant 
majority leader, it was 
announced by House Speaker 
David Bartley (D-Holyoke). 



The appointment also places 
Marshall on the Joint Rules 
Committee, which irons out 
differences' in legislation passed 
by the House and Senate. 

Marshall also retains his post 
on the House Committee on 
Counties. 



ERIC H. JOHNSON, M.D. 

of 

EYE HEALTH SERVICES, INC. 

Announces The Opening of His 

Office at 

1050 HANCOCK STREET, QUINCY 

for the practice of ophthalmology 

January 1973 

Office Hours by Appointment 
Telephone (617)471-4250 



The duty shoe that lets your 
foot off-duty early! 

Sertoli's White Duty Shoes are 

designed to make your shift 

seem hours shorter. There's 

plenty of toe room and a 

built-up arch to give 

you a gentle lift. 



Scholl 





Dr. ScholVs Footwear 

26 Cottap Ave. Quincy, Mass. 
479-1717 




Thursday, January 1 1, 1973 Quincy Sun Page 3 



Lo$t Over $100,000 In 1971 



Water Rate Hike ; $300,000 For 6,000 New Meters 




HELPING HANDS - Sixth grade pupils at Montelair School are raising money to aid victims of Managua 
•****•; by selling such items a, book,, brownies and cupcake,. Here with them ,s Mrs. Patnca 
Mahoney, one of the teachers heading up the project. 

[Quincy Sun Photo] 

Montelair Sixth Graders Aid Managua Victims 



The three sixth grade classes 
at Montelair School this week 
are selling pastries, books, 
magazines and chances to raise 
money for the victims of the 
devastating earthquake in 
Managua, Nicaragua. 

The chances are being sold on 



mobiles and posters that have 
been donated by sixth grade 
teachers and students. The 
drawing will be held Friday. 

The sixth graders are also 
accepting donations for the 
earthquake victims with the 



money to be turned over to 
CARE. 

Teachers who have been 
working with the youngsters on 
the project are Mrs. Helen 
O'Rourke, Room 6; Mrs. Patricia 
Mahoney, Room 7: and Miss 
Louise Keefe, Room 15. 



Seek 52,000 Foot Tract For Clay St. Senior Facility 



The Planning Board will meet 
today [Thursday] to consider a 
request from the Housing 
Authority for the acquisition of 
52,000 square feet off Clay St., 
Wollaston. 

The Housing Authority said 



the additional land is needed for 
construction of the new Clay St. 
senior citizens facility. 



The meeting will be at 3 p.m. 
at the Planning Department 
headquarters on Sea St. 



$48,745 Wiring During December 



Quincy Wire Inspector 
William H. Pitts issued 101 



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permits during December for 
wiring estimated to cost 
$48,745. Some $457.50 in fees 
were received. 

The department also issued 
68 certificates of approval and 
made 180 inspections during 
which 13 wiring defects were 
noted. There was also 11 
reinspections and two fire calls. 

The major wiring project for 
the month was in a new 
two-family house at 141 Centre 
St. 



By TOM HENSHAW 
Quincy lost more than 
$100,000 in 1971 through 
waste, defective equipment, and 
unrealistic rates in the Water 
Department, says the city's 
Capital Improvement 
Committee. 

It recommends spending 
'$300,000 for 6,000 new water 
meters and a hike in water rates 
and installation and repair costs 
to match those of surrounding 
cities and towns. 

The Capital Improvement 
Committee, chaired by John J. 
Lydon Jr., reported this week 
the results of a study of the 
Quincy Water Department. 
Some of its findings: 

• About half of the 20,336 
meters in use in Quincy give 
inaccurate readings due to 
deterioration of the meter 
through lack of care. 

• Two out of every five 
meters are more than 40 years 
old; three out of every five 
meters are more than 17 years 
old. ' 

• Quincy's industrial rate is 
32 cents per 100 cubic feet, 
compared to 53 cents in 
Braintree, 81 cents in Dedham, 
and $1.05 in Cohasset. 

'• Quincy charges $20 for 
repairs [$50 if digging is 
required] which often means 
that they are made at less than 
full cost. Nearby communities 
charge full costs. 

New meters, suggested the 
Lydon report, might increase the 
revenue from water users by as 
much as 100 percent. 

At least that's the average 
figure that turned up in a 
sampling of 18 different meter 
routes throughout the city. 

Said the report: 

"An example of actual 
increase in percentage of revenue 
resulting from new meter 
installation was performed by 
adding a minimum of three bills 
at 1972 rates issued before and 
after installation of new meters. 

"The percentage if increases 
are from a low of 4 1 per cent to 
a high of 212 per cent with an 
average percentage of increase of 
102 percent." 

In defense of the metered 
water system against proponents 
of the flat rate system, the 
report said : 

"The general laws of 
Massachusetts require cities and 
towns deriving all or part of 
their water supply from the 
Metropolitan system [and 



d* 1 



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ONE MAPLE STREET 
QUINCY SQUARE 




THANK 
YOU 



North Quincy 
High School Band 
for the great reception 

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e, 

QUINCY HIGH SCHOOL 
BAND 

COLOR GUARD 
& MAJORETTES 



Quincy doesl to equip all water 
services with meters. 

"It is only just that the 
consumer should pay in 
proportion to the amount of 
water used. The careful 
consumer benefits, the careless 
consumer is penalized. The poor 
actually pay more, through 
taxes, where meters are not 
used. 

"With the additions of lawn 
services and swimming pools the 
water meter becomes even more 
important as a device to measure 
accurate consumption of water. 
Waste is diminished, resulting in 
financial savings to all." 

The Quincy City Council, 
under the direction of 
Councillor Edward S. Graham, 
has been studying water meters 
for almost a year. Graham is an 
advocate of flat rate billing 
instead of new meters. 

The Lydon report also 
recommended "a program of 
preventive maintenance and 
cleaning of pipe be initiated in 
conjunction with the new meters 
being installed. 

"Otherwise, the city will be 

faced with the same 

deterioration of meters it now 
has, caused mainly by corrosive 

elements entering the meters 

thereby making the meters 
inaccurate." 

The stidy compared Quincy's 
rates to those of two other MDC 
water users, Boston and Milton, 
five that have their own town 
water supplies, Braintree, 
Cohasset, Scituate, Weymouth 
and Dedham; and one with a 
private water company, 
Hingham. 

• Industrial rates range from 
a low of 38 cents per hundred 
cubic feet [plus an annual charge 
for fixtures] in Scituate to a 
high of $1.05 in Cohasset. 
Quincy's rate: 32 cents. 

• Domestic rates range from a 
low of 38 cents per hundred 
cubic feet in Scituate and 
Dedham to a high of 86 cents in 
Hingham and Cohasset. Quincy's 
rate: 40 cents. 

• Installation costs are $60 
for the first foot plus 75 cents 
for each additional foot in 
Boston; $4 a foot in Braintree; 
$10 a foot in Milton; and full 
cost of job in Scituate, 
Weymouth and Dedham. Quincy 
charges $200 for the first 40 feet 
and $5 a foot thereafter. 

• Seven of the eight charge 
full costs for repairs while 
Milton's bill for repairs is the 
same as the charge for 
installation. In Quincy, it's $20 
without digging. $50 with 
digging. 

The report recommended 
"immediate matching in rates 
for industrial and domestic usage 
of water along with installation 
and repair cost to be equalized 
to compare with surrounding 
cities and towns." 




Page 4 Quincy Sun Thursday. January 1 1 , 1973 



Sunbeams 



By PAUL HAROLD 

There's more to Senator Arthur Tobin's recent appointment as 
vice chairman of Ways and Means Committee than meets the eye. 

Talk at the State House is that Ways and Means chairman, 
Senator James Kelly, may not seek re-election next session. And if 
that's the case, Tobin would be in line for the chairmanship of what 
is considered the most powerful and prestigious committee in the » 
upper chamber. 

TOBIN'S PREDECESSOR, Thomas Burgin, also served on the 

Ways and Means Committee. 

Burgin, a Republican, was appointed by Senate President John 

Powers, Democrat, in 1962. 

www 

ITS GOING TO BE the "Shipyard District". That's what insiders 
are saying about the proposed new Second Norfolk District (state 
representative] . The seat is presently held by Rep. Clifford Marshall. 
As drawn up, the new district will include the area around the 
shipyard, where a number of the yard workers live: Quincy's Ward 
Two, two precincts in Ward Three, two Bra in tree precincts [E. 
Braintree] and one Weymouth precinct (N. Weymouth] . 

Presently the district is comprised of Wards Two and Three in 
Quincy. • 

Under the new plan [if approved] Quincy will still dominate 
Quincy Point that is. 

Braintree was the real loser under this re-districting. The town is 
split into three districts, but will probably only end up with one 
representative [presently it has two] . East Braintree will be put into 
the Quincy dominated district while Braintree Highlands is joined to 
the Holbrook dominated district. 

While Quincy will naturally control the district in voting strength, 
a field of two or three candidates from Quincy running in the 
primary could give a Braintree candidate a chance to win the seat. 

And since it's an overwhelmingly Democratic district, nomination 
in the primary would be tantamount to election. 

* ** 

SPEAKING of Quincy Point. James Papile of the well-known 
Quincy Papile family, is telling friends he will run for the Ward 2 
City Council seat. 

And that should touch off speculation chain reaction like this: If 
Papile is thinking of going for that seat, present incumbent Clifford 
Marshall will run for council at-large. And if Marshall is considering 
running for council at-large, then Arthur Tobin will not seek 
re-election. [Okay, play it again. Sam.] 

www 

JILL WALKER, James Mclntyre's secretary in the Senate 
Counsel's office is leaving today for London, to attend her brother's 
wedding. The visit will also be a homecoming for her. She was born 
in England. # # ^ 

' JOIN THE QUINCY CITIZENS' Association" bumper stickers 
are beginning to show up around the city. The publicity campaign is 
the brainchild of QCA's new president, William O'Brien of 
Montchir. *** 

SCHOOL COMMITTEEMAN Daniel Raymondi was among those 
taking the recent bar examination. 

When he's swom in, he will be the third lawyer on the School 
Committee. The others are Paul Kelly and Harold Davis. 

www 
JOSEPH SHEA, executive secretary to Mayor Hannon, informs us 

that re-painting of the city seal in the council chamber is the work 

of James McGurl of Squantum. 

The brilliant colors of the seal are a welcome change from the 
previous drab brown. 

The seal appears to be made of plaster, and a close examination 
of it reveals the name of the artist, Americus Zottoli, 1937. 

McGurl, by the way, is a member of the Quincy Art Association, 
and his work can be seen around city hall. As a matter of fact, a few 
of his paintings are on display in the Mayor's office. 

*# * 

THE RECENT RENOVATIONS to the council chamber include 
new drapes. The gold color and design were the choice of Josephine 
Carnali. As clerk of committees for the City Council she spends a lot 
of time working in the chamber 

* * w 

CITY ASSESSOR John Comer of Quincy Point is busy weekends 

campaigning for state Vice Commander of the American Legion. 

The convention will be held in Springfield in July to choose five 
Vice Commanders from the 12 candidates. 

!* Comer is elected . he'll be in line to run for State Commander in 
i ■ a tiiree years. 

Hit chances look pretty good. There are no candidates from 
* : Ik Ccunty arc! only one other from Norfolk. 

And his position a- commander of the Suffolk County American 
Legion will cer airily g ve him an edge. 

w * w 
LOLIS CARUSO, former Quincy political candidate, is 
recuperating at his new home, 44 Newton Ave., East Braintree, 
following surgery. He's not expected to return to his city cemetery 

department job until March. 

* w* 

SMILE DEPT: Rev. John McMahon, pastor of St. Mary's Church, 
West Quincy. who was honored Sunday by parishioners on the 
occasion of his 30th anniversary in the priesthood likes to tell about 
the little boy who came to church for the first time. 

"Do you know how to genuflect?" he was asked. "No", the 
youngster replied, "but I do a nice somersault." 




Jack Anderson 

1972 Pulitzer Prize Winner for National Reporting, and 
Syndicated Columnist for The Quincy Sun 

# Meat Price$ Going Up-Again 

# Lotteries Stimulate Illegal Gambling 

# Unsung Whistle Blower Heroes 



WASHINGTON - The 
Price Commission somehow 
seems incapable of holding 
down (he price of meat. 

The Agriculture Depart- 
ment recently claimed that 
beef prices, over a four- 
month period, had gone down 
half-a-cent a pound. This 
must have startled house- 
wives who paid more, not 
less, for beef during the same 
four-month period. 

In the Pacific Northwest, 
for example, beef prices 
jumped 10 lo 40 cents per 
pound in a two-month period. 
A Seattle housewife, shopping 
for an average steak, now 
must shell out two dollars a 
pound. Hamburger meat 
costs about one dollar a 
pound. 

The Price Commission has 
quietly investigated spiraling 
meat costs. Yet its investiga- 
tors claim they found no 
evidence of unfair or unwar- 
ranted price increases. 

One excuse for higher meat 
prices is that the sale of 
wheat to the Soviet Union has 
driven up feed grain costs. 
Another excuse is that there 
are simply fewer cattle to 
satisfy the national appetite 
for beef. 

But the excuses don't 
square with the USDA figures 
which show cattlemen getting 
lower, nut higher, prices for 
their beef. 

Sources at the Agriculture 
Department suggest that 
some of the big meat packers 
and retailers have been skin- 
ning the customers as well as 
the beef. There is so little 
competition, my sources say, 
that the big meat dealers can 
get away with jacking up 
prices. And they can always 
find excuses to justify it. 

But the feed-grain rise and 
the cattle shortage undoub- 
tedly will affect the meat 
market in the future. House- 
wives can expect another na- 
tionwide meat price increase 
later in January. 



- Whistle Blowing - 

Whistle blowing is a hazar- 
dous occupation, when it's 
done by reformers seeking to 
protect the public. When Er- 
nest Fitzgerald and Gordon 
Rule blew the whistle on mili- 
tary waste, for example, the 
Pentagon retaliated against 

Veterans News 

The Veterans Administration 
urges all World War II, GI 
insurance policyholders to take a 
second look at the type of 
policy pay-off they have selected 
for their next of kin. 

VA warned that too many 
widows of World War II policy 
holders are penalized following 
their husband's death upon 
finding he had selected an 
option providing small monthly 
payments over 24 or 36 months. 
Oftentimes that selection was 
made over 25 years ago and 
never updated by the veteran. 

World War II policy holders 
who wish now to switch to lump 
sum payments, should ask VA 
for Form 29-336 and select 
Option 1 . Simply mail that form 
to the VA Insurance Center 
where he makes his payments, 
VA aid. 



them. These cases made the 
front pages, but there have 
been some unsung whistle 
blowers who also deserve 
public recognition. 

In Texas, biologist Richard 
Baldauf — the environmen- 
talist in residence at Texas 
A&M — published a scathing 
report on the environmental 
dangers of building a dam at 
the mouth of the Trinity 
River. 

When Baldauf continued to 
speak out against the project, 
university officials began to 
harrass him. They couldn't 
fire him outright because he 
had tenure. So they assigned 
him to teach a course at 
Uvalde. Tex?s. and another 
course at College Station, 
Texas. The two sites are more 
than 200 miles apart. He got 
so tired of driving back and 
forth that he finally gave up 
and moved to Kansas City. 

In Mississippi, another 
biologist, Jim Williams, stir- 
red up citizens in the sleepy 
town of Columbus against the 
Tennessee-Tombigbee 
Waterway. He took to the 
stump and told his neighbors 
that the waterway would turn 
the picturesque, lush area in 
the northeast corner of 
Mississippi into a muddy 
ditch. Because of his crusad- 
ing, Williams was told not to 
come back to his teaching job 
at the Mississippi State Col- 
lege for Women. 

In Georgia, Jim Morrison, 
the public relations chief for 
the Georgia Game and Fish 
Commission, mobilized the 
commission to oppose stream 
channelization, which can 
ruin streams and kill fish. As 
his reward, angry politicians 
demanded that he be fired. 
Within six months, the politi- 
cal pressure was so great he 
was told to resign. 

This is what happens, all 
too often, to citizens who dare 
to stand up and speak out. 

— Behind the Scenes — 

POTENTIAL WASHOUT - 
The contingency plans for 
bombing the dikes along 
North Vietnam's Red River 
have been updated. If Presi- 
dent Nixon renews the bomb- 
ing of North Vietnam and the 
dikes are hit, flood waters 
could wash out much of the 
country's ricelands. So far, 



the dikes have been spared 
for humanitarian reasons. 
Meanwhile. Air Force in- 
telligence claims that North 
Vietnam now has 240 Soviet- 
build MIG fighter planes. The 
North Vietnamese have been 
using them sparingly, 
however, against American 
planes. In combat, the MIGs 
apparently are outclassed. 
The Air Force claims 177 
MIGs have been shot down 
since they began arriving in 
North Vietnam. 

LOTTERIES BACKFIRE - 
Several states have now 
adopted lotteries to help raise 
funds and reduce taxes. The 
advocates have argued that 
legalized gambling will stop 
illegal gambling and strike a 
blow at the Mafia. However, 
an unpublicized study of legal 
gambling in six states shows 
that it doesn't curb illegal 
gambling at all. Instead, the 
study discloses that state lot- 
teries actually stimulate il- 
legal gambling in some areas 
and that the Mafia has started 
to use the official winning 
numbers as the payoff for 
their own illegal numbers 
games. 

WHITE COLLAR CRIME - 
We have been critical of At- 
torney General Richard 
Kleindienst for shutting his 
eyes to white-collar crimes. 
We contended that the law 
and order which Kleindienst 
preached should apply to 
business executives as well as 
street criminals. It is only fair 
to report, therefore, that 
Kleindienst has now ordered 
his subordinates lo crack 
down on white-collar crimes. 
He has stressed that the 
Justice Department should 
enforce the laws against the 
rich and respectable as well 
as the poor and unpopular. 

BLACK POLITICS - Black 
leaders have just completed a 
postelection survey of their 
gains in the South. Of 79,000 
elected officials in the II 
Southern states, only 1.158 are 
black. There are 102 predomi- 
nantly black counties in the 
South, yet blacks control the 
county commissions of only 
five. Despite this poor show- 
ing, the number of elected 
black officials in the South in- 
creased by 33 per cent in 1972. 
and blacks generally are en- 
couraged that they eventually 
will find the solution to their 
problems in the ballot box. 




Published weekly on Thursday by 
The Quincy Sun Publishing Company 
1601 Hancock Street, Quincy, Mtvnchusetts 02169 

Publisher and Editor 
Henry W. Bosworth, Jr. 
104 Per Copy $3.50 Per Year 

Out of State $4.50 Per Year 
Telephone; 471-3100. 471-3101 

Second Oats Postage Paid at Boiton. Mats. 

MEMBER NEW ENGLAND PRESS ASSOCIATION 

Tht Quincy Sun ihuimi no financial 
"•portability (of typographical «non in 
'dvtrtiaamanu but will reprint that part ol an 
tiaamtnt in which the typographical arror 



an 



Thursday, January 1 1 , 1973 Quincy Sun Page 5 



Economic 
Stabilization 



This column of questions and answers on the President's Economic 
Stabilization Program is provided by the local office of the U.S. 
Internal Revenue Service and is published as a public service. The 
column answers questions most frequently asked about wages and 
prices. 

Q - How long does a landlord have to make a refund to a tenant 
after the IRS notifies him that he is violating the rent control 
regulations? 

A • If all or part of an increase is determined to be illegal, the 
landlord has 30 days to refund this amount to the tenant. 

Q - 1 signed a lease on Jan. 1, 1972, and my landlord did not raise 
rent at all during the year. He now wants to raise rent five percent 
next year-twice the automatic 2Vi percent increase allowed under 
the rent regulations. Can he do this? 

A - Yes. This automatic 2Vi percent annual increment may be 
accumulated. This means that if a landlord did not take advantage of 
it one year, he may use it the following year. 

Q - If I raise my tenants' rent only 1 percent early in 1973, can 1 
raise their rent by the remainder of the automatic Vh percent 
increase later in the same year? 

A - No. This automatic increment may be used only once in any 
12-month period, regardless of whether all or only part of the total 
allowable increment is used in the increase. 

Q - I raised my employees' wages by 5.5 percent in Dec. 1971, 
and I want to give them a similar increase now. Do I increase wages 
by 5.5 percent of what I'm currently paying or by 5.5 percent of 
what I was paying before last year's increase? 

A - You may increase their pay by 5 .5 percent of current wages 
and salaries. 

Q • Can a person apply for a ruling or determination from the IRS 
based on hypothetical facts? 

A - No. A request for a ruling or determination may not be based 
on hypothetical facts. For details on how to apply for an Economic 
Stabilization ruling or determination, write your Internal Revenue 
district office and ask for IRS Publication 3009, "IRS Rulings and 
Determinations", or IRS Publication S-3041, "Inquiries and 
Determination Requests". They're available at no charge. 

Q - If a doctor leaves a salaried position in a hospital and enters 
private practice, how does lie determine his base price? 

A - In this case the physician would follow the rule for new 
products or services. A person beginning a new service after 
November 13, 1971, may charge a price for his service which 
represents a computation based on the average price charged for the 
same or similar service in a substantial number of transactions in the 
marketing area. 



Q 

visit? 



Is a private physician entitled to increase his fee for an office 



A - Yes. A physician may increase his fee for a particular service 
to reflect an increase in the cost of that service, provided that the 
increase in the doctor's total annual revenue does not exceed 2.5%, 
and does not cause the base period profit margin to be exceeded. 

• Youth Speaks Out 

• January 20 is the date of the inauguration or should we say 
coronation. 

• Last week the students at Quincy High were warned against a 
strike over Open Campus. The local daily put this news on page one 
— another example of unbiased journalism, especially in view of far 
more important events occurring all around us. 

• We have been informed that Massachusetts may have a daily 
lottery by June. Actually we already have one — it's called driving 
your car. 

• The Washington Redskins defeated Dallas-- -one of the few times 
the Indians have beaten the cowboys. 

• The United States is importing more and more new items. Two of 
the least popular are the Hong Kong and London flus. 

• President Nixon will not take over as coach of the Patriots. 
Although he has the experience with the long bomb and blitzes, and 
he is big on, defense, he has never been able to get beyond a 
nine-point plan, his draft is weak and he has a history of fumbling, 
especially when things are right at hand. 

Q.H.S. Journalism Class 



birth 

defects 

are forever. 




fTWch of Dimes 



unless you help. 



THIC »PACt CONTDI.UTCD .T TNI PU.LI.M*. 



Consumer 
Corner 



By ROBERT H. QUINN 
Attorney General 

Consumer's rights and 
industry's faults have filled news 
pages, pamphlets and air waves 
for the past several years. Laws 
have been passed and regulations 
established telling the business 
community how to act. 

However, consumers should 
remember that they too are 
obligated to be ethical and 
considerate in their dealings. My 
Consumer Protection Division 
reminds Massachusetts 
consumers to: 

1 . Read all contracts carefully 
before signing. In certain 
instances consumers have signed 
contracts after only half-reading 
them or without reading them at 
all. Afterwards they have filed 
complaints against companies 
for failure to live up to 
commitments which the 
businesses were not obligated to 
perform under the terms of the 
contract. 

2. Handle merchandise 
carefully. Consumers should 
remember that stores have a 
right to refuse to accept 
damaged merchandise for which 
a credit or refund is sought. 

3. Pay bills when they are 
due. If unable to do so, 
consumers should inform the 

•merchant. An agreement 
involves two parties and specific 
obligations. Intentional 
delinquency or indifference to 
bills can jeopardize a consumer's 
credit rating. 

4. Fill out credit applications 
accurately and honestly. 

5. Point out mistakes made in 
your favor. Cashiers must make 
up shortages out of their own 
pockets. Recently a New York 
discount house conducted an 
experiment in which twenty 
customers were deliberately 
overcharged 40 cents and 
another 20 were undercharged 
the same amount. Eighteen of 
those overcharged called the 
error to the attention of the 
cashier. However, of those 
undercharged only two reported 
the mistake. 

6. Buy carefully-merchandise 
return policies are determined 
by individual companies. 
Consumers should learn what 
these policies are before 
purchasing an item they may 
have to return. 



Living, Today 

By Dr. William F. Knox 
Personal Counselor 



'Kick Your Bad Habits' 

"I'm on my last pack...when I finish these I'm through with the 
stinkin' things," said a young businessman, determined to kick his 
cigarette habit by the beginning of 1973. 

Convinced that her proneness to messiness in her home was 
degrading to her, and terribly annoying to her husband, a South 
Suburban housewife had decided to kick her habit of a littered 
house. She'd always copped out with. .."I want my house to look 
lived in." Her husband said..."It did. ..by a bunch of pigs." 

What bad habit do you want to kick? This is the time to do it. ..at 
the beginning of a new year. One lady weighed in this week at 148 
pounds. She promised me that she'd stay on her diet and weigh 140 
at her next appointment in two weeks. One man who had been a real 
grouch has promised his wife.. .and himself.. .that he'll kick his bad 
habit of hurting his family with his grouchiness. I've encouraged 
several patients recently to kick the habit of ignoring their alarm 
clocks in the morning...to hit the deck at the time they have 
assigned. I've also encouraged mothers...and wives...and husbands to 
stop calling.. .Let the alarm clock do the dirty work. You can kick 
the habit of laziness in the morning. 

A real victory is being waged by a woman I know who has a 
poison tongue. ..which she had used almost daily against her 
husband. She's nice to him when she wants something from 
him. ..but within an hour she'll cut him to ribbons with her vicious 
verbal attacks. She's been known to transfer her poison tongue to 
her poison pen. ..both come from her poison mind. 

In fact all these bad habits come from. ..or are sustained by the 
mind which has been poisoned to produce behavior which is beneath 
the dignity of each individual. ..which degrades oneself and others. 
It's false to say. .."Let me be.. .this is the way I am." That's an 
unworthy excuse for your bad habit. You can kick your bad habit. 

But how? How do I quit smoking...quit overeating. ..quit the 
messiness. ..morning laziness... poison communication. Four 
necessary steps: First. ..feel a need to change. The lady with the 
poison tongue had lost every fnend she'd had. When she saw that she 
needed friends, she determined to kick her habit. Excuses.. .blaming 
must cease.. .recognized need takes over. ..then one can kick the 
habit. 

Secondly. ..have something better to turn to. The reward for the 
person who kicks the cigarette habit is better health. ..no more chest 
pains.. .reduction of ugly phlegm. ..and all this within a week. One 
begins to feel he is master of his life. ..when one kicks the habit. 

Thirdly.,.stay with the "better way" until it becomes your way of 
life. For example... you can't keep your kitchen clean for just one 
day and then slip back to your messy habit. Stay with it until it 
becomes your new way of life. Anything worthwhile takes 
effort. ..personal discipline of your reasoning mind. Allow sufficient 
time for the results. Don't expect immediate results. ..it'll take some 
doing. 

Lastly. ..if you stumble and repeat your old habit...start again. 
You may have setbacks...don't let that discourage you. You can kick 
any habit you decide to kick. The whole thing rests with your mind. 

FOR YOUR COMMENTS. ..Group Therapy. ..Private 
Counseling.. ."People Are For Loving" [$3.00]: 628 High St., 
Dedham or 659-7595 or 326-5990. 



QUESTION OF THE WEEK 

How Many Bills Filed? 



"How many bills were filed 
this year in the Massachusetts 
legislature?" asked a caller to the 
League of Women Voters Voter 
Information Phone. Last year's 
volume ran around 7,622 bills, 
yet 1973 threatens to break all 
records "according to the League. 

The LWV Voter Information 
Phone gave the caller more 
information. 7,596 bills were 
filed by the Dec. 6 pre-session 
deadline, but that will not be the 
final figure. Additional bills will 
be filed by the Governor and 
more will be admitted under 
late-filing procedures. The 
legislative leaders will be less 
receptive toward late-filed bills 
because of the increasing 
volume, but this session seems 
well on its record breaking way. 

This question is one of many 
now being received by the 
League of Women Voters' Voter 
Information Phone. Individuals 
with any questions on 
government may call the VIP 
Phone Monday through Friday 
between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. The 
number in the Boston area is 



357-5880. Outside the Boston dial the toll-free number 
metropolitan area callers should 1-800-882-1649. 



TICKLE BOX 9 



by Ted Trogdon 




'!*?■ *W' rt p , o 



wchLI* K..M'* h, r-t «\ 



"Relax. He ju«t wants to use oir ph 



Page 6 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 1 1 , 1973 




QUINCY RESIDENTS Mr. and Mrs. Larry Antonelli of 34 Dewson Rd chat with Archbishop Humberto 
Medeiros during Catholic Charitable Bureau fund-raising social aboard the SS Peter Stuyvesant at 
Anthony's Pier Four, Boston. 

Pottery Story For Wollaston Woman's Club 



"The Story of Dorchester 
Pottery", will be told by Doris 
Oberg at a meeting of the 
Wollaston Woman's Club Jan. 
16, at the Wollaston Lutheran 
Church. 

Miss Oberg will display old 
pottery and demonstrate the 
making of what is becoming a 
collector's item since the 



Dorchester pottery works is no 
longer in existence. 

Mrs. Richard D. Schiavo will 
preside at the meeting. 

Hostesses for the 1 p.m. 
social hour preceding the 
meeting will be Mrs. Schiavo, 
Miss Lydia B. Randall, Mrs. 
Matti Walman, Mrs. Arthur G. 
McLean, Mrs. Stephen Bagnell, 



Crazy Hat Parade For N.Q. 
Catholic Women's Club 



The Catholic Women's Club 
of North Quincy will meet 
tonight [Thursday] at 8:15 p.m. 
in the Sacred Heart School Hall. 

Mrs. Bernard Doherty and 
Mrs. Bernard Moore are 



chairmen. 

A Crazy Hat Parade will be 
followed by a Beano game. 
Prizes will be awarded for the 
best hats. 



Quincy Sons Of Italy 
Social Center 

120 Quarry St. Quincy 

Newest function hall now available for weddings, showers, dinner 
dances. Main [Golden Lion] Suite has cathedral ceiling. . Brides 
room - ultra modern sound system. Completely air conditioned. 

FOR RESERVATION CALL 
FANTUCCHIO REALTY - 773-7010 



COLPITIS SffiK 

1550 Hancock St., Quincy 472-005 1 

Call Colpitis Now 472-0051 

Take A 
Bermuda Break 

In Rendezvous Time* 

We will be happy to 
arrange your vacation! 



w 



> 



?>» 



Off Season Rates Are Now 
In Effect Until March 



Mrs.' Charles Campbell, Mrs. 
Harold M. Knowles, Miss Rachel 
Allbee, Mrs. Harold P. Hilstrom, 
Mrs. Franklin B. Mitchell, Mrs. 
John S. Leland, Mrs. George H. 
McGill, Miss Mary Bair and Mrs. 
Gilbert M. Fox Jr. 

Mrs. Hattiemay Thomas and 
Mrs. Frederick W. Swain Jr. will 
pour. 



Marriage 
Intentions 



Stylianos I. Katsikis, 45 5 A 
Sea St., Quincy, restaurant 
worker; Chrisoula 
Giannakopoulos, 15 Beaumont 
Terr., Springfield, teacher. 

Jerry W. McKay, 510 Union 
St., Weymouth, U.S.Navy;» 
Arlene M. Farrell, 98 Bigelow 
St.; Quincy, student. 

Michael W. M. Rusnak, 3rd, 
52 Brackett St., Quincy, 
self-employment; Doris E. 
Keddy, 24 Sigourney St., 
Jamaica Plain, nurse. 

Stephen A. Cahill. 480 Beale 
St., Quincy, warehouse clerk; 
Helen E. McLaughlin, 23 Sims 
Rd, Quincy, manager. 



DERRINGER 

THE FLORIST 

Hants Arrangements Mowers 

389 Hancock St. 773-0959 




MARKING their 55th wedding anniversary at a dinner party are Mr. 
and Mrs. M. Joseph Fanning of 73 Bickneli St., Germantown. 

Mr., Mrs. M. Joseph Fanning 
Mark 55th Anniversary 



Mr. and Mrs. M. Joseph 
Fanning of 73 Bickneli St., 
Germantown, were honored on 
their 55th wedding anniversary 
at a dinner party Jan. 6 at 
Dutton's Restaurant, Quincy. 

Attending wjre seven of their 
eight children and 'their 
husbands or wives: Mr. and Mrs. 
Esric [Dorothy] Trubiano, Mr. 
and Mrs. William [Marion] 
Dwyer, Mr. and Mrs. John 
[Claire] Sullivan, Mr. and Mrs. 
Joseph Fanning and Mr. and 
Mrs. John [Joan] Santos, all of 
Quincy; Mr. and Mrs. George 



[Eleanor] Weeks of Brockton 
and Mr. and Mrs. Francis 
[Catherine] Publicover of 
Whitman. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Fanning 
of Redondo Beach, Calif., were 
unable to attend. 

However, amongthose 
attending were Mr. and Mrs. 
William Hardy of Quincy. She is 
a granddaughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Fanning were 
married Jan. 6, 1918 at St. 
Augustus Church, South Boston. 
They have 33 grandchildren and 
nine great grandchildren. 



Beth Israel Brotherhood 
To Hear Handwriting Expert 



Beth Israel Brotherhood will 
hear John J. Swanson, an expert 
in handwriting analysing, 
Sunday morning, Jan. 21. 

Rabbi Jacob Mann will 
conduct the morning service at 
8:30 a.m. and the breakfast will 
follow. 

Swanson, a qualified 
Graphoanalyst, has presented 
over 2,000 lectures throughout 
the United States and Western 
Europe. He has appeared on 
television and radio. Swanson is 
prominent in handwriting 
Identification and Forgery 
examination work. In this 
capacity he assists the police, 



courts and banks in the Eastern 
Massachusetts area. 

The Women's Council, the 
Synagogue and the Brotherhood 
are invited to this breakfast 
meeting. 

Installation of the 
Brotherhood officers for 
1973-1975 will take place with 
Rabbi Jacob Mann as the 
installing officer. 

Morton Arons is the 
Brotherhood President, Mrs. 
Henry Lapon is the President of 
the Womens Council and Jack 
Klaver is the Synagogue 
President. 



Ward 2 Civic Association 
To Install On Saturday 



The Ward 2 Civic Association 
will hold its installation of 
officers and board of director, 
Jan. 1 3, at 7:30 p.m. at the Fore 
River Club, Nevada Road. 

There will be a buffet and 
dancing to the music of Guy 
Oliveri. Admission is free. 

Officers for the coming year 
are: 

Mrs. Phyllis Bagen, president; 
Theodore Harrington, 
vice-president; Mrs. Jeanette 
MacDonald, treasurer; Mrs. Nina 




Liberal Arts 

Fashion Merchandising 

General Studies 



Secretarial Science 
— Executive 
— Legal 
— Medical 
— Therapeutic 



• TWO CAMPUSIS— witki* RjlMftai «. mWutiBt tim9 
fr»m Boston: 



MILTON, 02186 

303 Adams Street 

(417) 698 7511 

• WRITl: Director of Admissions 

I I I I I I I I ■ II || | || || || , ,, Mi n jj 



MILTC 

L303 Ad 
(417) 
; 
«b*8fl 



NEWTON, 02158 
15 Walnut Fork 
(617) 244-8134 



Mayo, recording secretary; 
Thomas Williams, corresponding 
secretary. 

The board of directors 
includes Owen Eaton, James 
Lyons, Theodore DeCristofaro, 
Ken Wilson and Rep. Clifford 
Marshall. 

Selected to be honored this 
year by the Ward 2 Civic 
Association for their 
contribution to the community 
and city are: 

Raymond Dunn of 17 
Murdock Ave., Mrs. Grace 
Wagner of Mound St., and Mrs. 
Marion Andrews, Senior Citizens 
Director of Activities for the 
City of Quincy. 



Start Th» New Yea^ Right 

Have your 

hair frosted 

and restyled 



RUSSELL 
EDWARDS 

Hair Stylist 



S"*~-rtS~3""'~ - 



r* : . '. "j? ' 



"*'S*i>~ 




Thursday, January 1 1 , 1973 Quincy Sun Page 7 



ENGAGED - Mr. and Mrs. Charles J. fetalis of Dorchester announce 
the engagement of their daughter Miss Nancy A. Petelis to George W. 
Duncan, son of Mrs. Julia Duncan of 92 Botolph St., North Quincy 
and the late Mr. George W. Duncan. Miss Petelis is a graduate of 
Lynn Classical High School and is employed at Prudential Insurance 
Co. in Boston. Mr. Duncan is a graduate of North Quincy High 
School and is employed at General Dynamics of Quincy. A May 
wadding is planned. [Spi | lwl , studio] 

St. James Apostle Guild 
Plans Today's Woman' Jan. 15 



"Today's Woman" will be 
presented Jan. 15 for the St. 
James the Apostle Guild. 

The program will be at St. 
Ann's Youth Center, W^ollaston, 
at 8 p.m. 

The program is designed to 
include information of current 
interest for homemakers and 
working 'gals', and will feature 
cooking in the thermatronic 
microwave oven, uses for the 
Oster blender and Oster 
super-pan, ■ cooking with and 
sampling of Supreme wine, as 
well as many other helpful hints. 

Kathryn Lynch McCarthy 
and Mary Margaret McCabe, 
Food Consultants, have 



presented other programs in the 
greater Boston area for several 
years. Mrs. McCarthy has 
appeared on television in 
Boston, Albany, and 
Philadelphia introducing new 
ideas and unique delectable 
foods of interest to all 
homemakers. 

Co-chairmen are Mrs. Mildred 
Tweedy and Mrs. Nancy 
McCormick. The committee 
includes: 

Mrs. Barbara O'Connor, Mrs. 
Marion McDonald, Mrs. Alice 
Dooley, Mrs. Ann Horrigan, Mrs. 
Connie Ducey, Mrs. Evelyn 
Quinn, Mrs. Lillian McCrackin, 
Mrs. Connie Peak, Mrs. 
Rosemary Kerrissey. 



of Quincy. Great Grandmother 
is Mrs. Hazel Babbitt, also of 
Quincy. 



M r.,Mrs. James Bevilacqua Parents Of Son 

Mr. and Mrs. James 
Bevilacqua of 14 Glenwood 
Way, Quincy, are parents of 
their first son, Joseph Phillip, 
born Jan. 1, at Quincy City 
Hospital. 

Mrs. Bevilaqua is the former 
Judith Wiltshire. 

Grandparents are Mr. and 
Mrs. Robert Wiltshire and Mr. 
and Mrs. James Bevilacqua Sr., 



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$2.75 UP 

SUNSHINE 
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16 Beale St. 

Wollaston 



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1422 Hancock St. ^A*^ 
Quincy, Mass ^*»«1 

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Births 



At Quincy City Hospital 

December 29 

Mr. and Mrs. William Trifone, 
24 Mortimer Terrace, a son. 

December 30 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis Butcher, 
80 South Walnut St., a daughter. 

January 1 

Mr. and Mrs. James 
Bevilacqua, 14 Glenwood Way, a 
son. 

January 2 

Mr. and Mrs. William 
Reardon, 70 Chickatabot Road, 
a son. 

January 3 * 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald A. 
Richardson, 57 Trevore St., a 
daughter. 

January 6 

Mr. and Mrs. Gary Klock, 97 
Doane St., a daughter. 

At St. Margaret's Hospital 

December 2 1 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles J. 
Henwood Sr., 384 Manet Ave., a 
daughter. 

December 23 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Ross, 5 1 
Division St., a daughter. 

December 24 

Mr. and Mrs. James M. Mylett 
Jr., 185 Atlantic St., a daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. James L. 
Murphy, 67 Brook St., a 
daughter. 

December 29 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis J. 
Maloney, 44 Willet St., a son. 

At South Shore Hospital 

December 23 

Mr. and Mrs. William 
McConnell, 60 Trafford St., a 
son. 

At Beth Israel Hospital 

January 1 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Parrish, 
30A Roberts St., a son. 




! 



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SENIOR CITIZENS 
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HAIR CUT $1.00 



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WASH it SET Vi PRICE 



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I CALL 472- WI7 OR 471-4140 

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ENGAGED - The engagement of Mist Deborah Delia Barba to Carl 
H. Lindgren is announced by her parents. Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Delia 
Barba of 15 Graham Terrace, Quincy. He is the son of Mrs. Judith 
H. Lindgren and the late Lennart M. Lindgren of 21 Merrill Ave., 
Wollaston. Miss Delia Barba, a Quincy High School graduate, is a 
senior at Aquinas Junior College of Business and will graduate in 
May. Mr. Lindgren graduated from Quincy High School, and 
attended Quincy Junior College. He is presently employed by 
Steadfast Rubber Company in Mattapan. There are no immediate 
wedding plans. (Mi|klr Studjo] 

Seniors Spaghetti Supper 
Reservations Deadline Jan. 15 



Reservations for the Quincy 
Senior Citizens annual Spaghetti 
Supper and Dance to be held 
Jan. 19, at the Fore River 
Clubhouse will close Jan. 15. 

The event is being sponsored 
by the Quincy Recreation 
Department under the direction 
of Mrs. Marion Andrews, 
Director of Senior Citizens 
Activities. 

Bus transportation will be 
provided from Houghs Neck 



Legion Post Home, Oceanview, 
Martensen Street and 1000 
Southern Artery elderly housing 
complexes. The schedule will be 
announced. 

Tickets are available from 
Senior Citizens Club presidents 
or the Quincy Recreation 
Department office in the 
Kennedy Health Center. 

A social hour will be held at 
5:30 p.m. followed by the 
supper at 6:30 p.m. and dancing 
from 8 p.m. until 1 1 p.m. 



St. Ann's Seniors Bingo Party Jan. 15 



A Bingo party will follow the 
business meeting of St. Ann 
Senior Citizens Jan. 15 at 1 p.m. 
in St. Ann Recreation Center, 
St. Ann Road, Wollaston. 



The committee includes John 
Harmon, John Dever, Paul 
Fusari, Ruth Duffy and Helen 
Shea. 

Refreshments will be served. 



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1 

1 

i 
i 

2 it ckSt. uuincy suite in- io« * 

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PERMANENT REMOVAL 
OF UNWANTED HAIR 

Lola F. Kilduff, R.E. 

Registered and Licensed Electrologist 

For Men and Women 
By Appointment Only - Day or Evening 
Consultations Invited 
1621 Hancock St.. Quincy Suite 8 773-1532 



i 

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I53B HoikkIc St, Quincy 
Men Thru Sat. II - 
Thin, ft Fri. Til 9 

CLEARANCE 
SALE 

Suits, Dresses 
and Robes 



20% to 50% Off 
Sizes 8-20 




Many different styles! 



M 



mtf m i W i ■ ' m i l . 



Page 8 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 11. 1973 



/ 




Guido Falcone Sr„ 76, of 
Casrel Gudice, Italy, formerly of 
Quincv, at his home in Italy, 
Dec. 22. 

Mrs. Eleanor /,. /Morris/ 
Wood, 49, of Keene, N.H., 
formerly of Quincy, at Mary 
Hitchcock Hospital, Hanover, 
N.H., Dec. 27. 

Miss Lift Boudreau, 77, of 
1246 Hanock St., at her home, 
Dec. 27. 

Mrs. Helen M. /Morse/ 
iolhrook, 95, of Meadow Lakes, 
lights town, N.J., formerly of 
Quincy, at the Meadow Lakes 
\kdi:.ti Center, Dec. 27. 

William H. Kerrigan, 75, of 
litrrlngtan. Conn., formerly of 
QuIhcY, at a Connecticut nursing 
home. Dec. 28. 

Miss Mary McMenimon, 88, 
of 19 S'ew field St., at a 
B'ointree nursing home, Dec. 29 

Walter. E. Read. 77, of 896 
Plymouth St.. Abington, 
formerly of Quincy. at the 
Brockton Veterans Hospital, 
Dec. 30. 

James A. Connors, 67, of 20 
Beckett St.. in Quincy City 
Hospital. Dec. 30. 

Forrest L. Wilson, 69, of 2 74 
Water St., unexpectedly in 
I.akeville, Dec. 31. 

Mrs. Giovina /Delia Barha/ 
Oliverio, 84, of 161 Sumner St., 
at Milton Hospital, Dec. 31. 

Mrs. Rita F. /Kennedy/ 
Mignault, 56, of 91 North 
Central Ave., at a local nursing 
home, Dec. 31. 

Carl A. Capone, 57, of 35 
Wesson Ave., at Quincy City 
Hospital, Dec. 31. 

Joseph A. Lennon, 62, of 2 
Carruth St^. at the Jewish 
Memorial Hospital, Boston, Dec. 
31. 

Percy E. Blair, 74, of 125 
Elliott Ave., unexpectedly at 
Quincy City Hospital, Jan. 1. 



Walter M, Milne, 77, of 50 
Pierce A ve., Hanson, formerly of 
Quincy, in Plymouth County 
Hospital, Jan. 1. 

Mrs. Elizabeth K. /Kid] 
Gunning, 84, of 95 Martensen 
St., unexpectedly, at her home, 
Jan. 1. 

Joseph E. Cyr, 66, of 99 
Essex St., Weymouth, formerly 
of Quincy, at his home, Jan. 1. 

Mrs. Evelyn /MacKenziej 
MacLeod, 73, of 49 Endicott 
St., at a nursing home, Jan. 2. 

Miss Ellen L. Starr, 80, of 65 
Adams St., Holbrook, formerly 
of Quincy, at Deering Nursing 
Home in Hingham, Jan. 2. 

Miss Ruth L Clark, 70, of 1 7 
Greenleaf St., unexpectedly at 
Massachusetts General Hospital, 
Boston, Dec. 31. 

Timothy J. Purcell, 74, of 
191 Fenno St., unexpectedly at 
Quincy City Hospital, Jan. 2. 

Mrs. Alice /Yule/ Mosher, 
89, of 40 Sherwood Rd, No. 
Weymouth, formerly of Quincy, 
at the Elihu White nursing home 
in Brain tree, Jan. 2. 

John 11. Heaney Jr., of 
Belmont, N.H.. formerly of 
Quincy, at Lakes Region 
Hospital, Laconia, N.H., Jan. 2. 

Mrs. Ruth /Dix/ Law, 54, of 
23 Christopher Drive, Milton, 
formerly of Quincy, 
unexpectedly at her home, Jan 
3. 

Lawrence P. DeCoste Jr., 60, 
of 17 Rockland St., on arrival at 
Quincy City Hospital, Jan. 3. 

Mrs. Prudence A. /Zwinglasj 
Urpton, of 8 Doe Road, South 
Yarmouth, formerly of Quincy, 
at Cape Cod Hospital, Hyannis, 
Jan. 3. 

Mrs. Helen /Hunter/ Smith, 
86, of 11 Guild St., at Quincy 
City Hospital, Jan. 4. 



John F. Palma, 55, of 87 
Linwood St., Holbrook, 
formerly of Quincy, at Brockton 
Hospital, Jan. 4. 

Francis S. J. Dodd, 84, at the 
Robbin House nursing home, 
Jan. 4. 

Sidney C. Milgate, 80, of 412 
Front St., Weymouth, formerly 
of Quincy, at South Shore 
Hospital, Weymouth, Jan. 5. 

Mrs. Charlotte A. [Myatt] 
Murphy, 62, of 16 Taft St., at 
Quincy City Hospital, Jan. 5. 

George H. Crocker, 72, of 66 
Ray croft St., at home, Jan. 6. 

Hugh J. Bradley, 69, of 18 
Dunbar Drive, Medford, 
formerly of Quincy, on arrival at 
the Lawrence Memorial 
Hospital, Jan. 6. 

, Mrs. Barbara F. /McCabeJ 
Leone, 39, of 28 Sexton Circle, 
at Quincy City Hospital, Jan. 6. 

Mrs. Alice F. /BlytheJ 
Kennedy, 65, of 173 Harriet 
Ave., at Deaconess Hospital, 
Boston, Jan. 7. 

James F. Hickey, 81, of 31 
Apple ton St., at Quincy City 
Hospital, Jan. 7. 

Frank R. McCormick, 57, of 
28 Oval Road, unexpectedly at 
home, Jan. 7. 

Miss Margaret A. King of 29 
Channing St., at a local nursing 
home, Jan. 8. 

Mrs. Agnes G. /O'LoughlinJ 
Wilcox, 82, of 1066 Sea St., at 
Carney Hospital, Dorchester, 
Jan. 7. 

Richard T. Reardon, 40, of 4 
Cavanaugh Rd, Braintree, 
formerly of Quincy, at the 
Lemuel Shattuck Hospital, 
Boston, Jan. 8. 

Robert C. Parsons, 19, of 295 
West St., Randolph, formerly of 
Quincy, at home, Jan. 8. 

Edmond J. D'Entremont, 86, 
of 36 Hanna St., at the Colonial 
Nursing Home, Weymouth, Jan. 
9. 



Rev. Miriam Eccles To Speak Sunday 
At Golden Rule Bible Class 



Rev. Miriam R. Eccles will be 
the speaker at the Golden Rule 
Bible Class Jan. 14 at 9:15 a.m. 
at the Senior Citizens Drop-In 
Center. 24 High School Ave. 

Music will be by Prof Norma 



MacLeod and Florence Hardy 
Lund in, accompanied at the 
piano by Mrs. Anna Hemeon. 
Edward Kelliher will play hymns 
on his guitar and harmonica. 
Mrs. Katherine Rose will be 



hostess. Substituting for Dr. Carl 
Leander, who is in the Quincy 
Nursing Home, will be Oliver F. 
Tatro Jr., who will direct the 
class. Regardless of race, 
everybody is welcome to attend 



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Bethany, Church 
To Hold 141st Annual 
Meeting On Jan. 17 



The 141st annual meeting of 
Bethany Congregational Church, 
will be convened at the church 
Jan. 17 at 7:30 p.m. by 
Moderator, Louise B. Forsyth. 

The session will open with a 
constituting prayer and a 
memorial service for members 
who died in 1972. The ministers, 
Rev. John D. Banks and Rev. 
Arthur R. Curtis will officiate. 

The annual reports of the 
church will be distributed prior 
to the meeting so that members 
can be prepared with comments 

and questions. 

William L. Lipp, chairman of 
the Finance Committee, will 
present the budget proposed for 
1973. Other active members of 
the Finance Committee include 
Mrs. Robert W. McLain, Mrs. 



Allan W. Cole, Mrs. Charles B. 
Allen, Donald F. Sargent, David 
S. Carr and Raymond W. Morse. 

The slate of officers for 1973 
will be submitted by Robert W. 
McLain, chairman of the 
Nominating Committee. 
Committee members who 
worked to secure the 80 
members to fill the vacancies in 
the church organization include 
Mrs. Bruce G. Crofts, Mrs. Carl 
E. Siddens, Mrs. Hugh J. 
MacFarlane, Miss Donna Zanolli, 
Bruce G. Crofts and Clarence 
Edwards. 

Preceding the formal meeting, 
a fellowship period with dessert 
and coffee will be served in the 
parish house at 7 p.m. Miss 
Muriel J. Goudey, second vice 
president of the Women's Union 
is chairman. 



Rev. Ronald 
To Become Co-Pastor 
Quincy Point Church 



The Quincy Point 
Congregational Church departs 
from what is considered normal 
in church administration Feb. 1 
by taking on the equivalent of a 
co-pastor to help the Rev. 
Bedros Baharian. 

And the new pastor will live 
in Braintree. 

The Rev. Ronald J. Cebik will 
be the preaching minister and 
will handle parish administration 
while the Rev. Mr. Baharian 
oversees- parish finances and 
devotes most of his time to the 
Senior Citizens Center at 1000 
Southern Artery. 

The church also has an 
assistant pastor, the Rev. Philip 
J. Mayher, who ministers to the 
young folks and runs the church 
school. 

The Rev. Mr. Cebik's 



parsonage will be at 15 Parkside 
Circle, Braintree, near the 
Braintree Dam and some three 
miles from the church. 

"The need for administer to 
live next door to the church is 
fast disappearing," says the Rev. 
Mr. Baharian, "as transportation 
and communication gets better." 

The Rev. Mr. Cebik, whose 
wife is expecting their first child 
in April, is currently serving as 
interim pastor of the First 
Congregational Church in 
Weymouth. 

A native of Stratford, Conn., 
he [like the Revs. Mr. Baharian 
and Mayher] is a graduate* of 
Andover Newton Theological 
Seminary. He has served parishes 
in Cornwall and Danbury, 
Conn., since his ordination in 
1961. 



Survival Director To Address 
Church Women United Friday 



Charles Dimond, director of 
Survival, Inc., will speak at the 
annual dinner meeting of Church 
Women United in Quincy Friday 
at Quincy Point Congregational 
Church. 

A dinner at 6:30 p.m. will be 
served by women of the church, 
and the business meeting will 



follow. Annual reports will be 
distributed and there will be 
election of officers for 1973. 

Mrs. H. Wallace Sylvester, 
president, is in charge of 
arrangements. Mrs. Mark Adair, 
vice president, is reservation 
chairman. 

An executive board meeting 
is scheduled for 5:30 p.m. 



Donald Wilder Jan. 17 Speaker 
At Quincy Community Forum 



Donald C. Wilder, editor of 
The Patriot Ledger, will 
inaugurate the Quincy 
Community Forum Jan. 17 at 

7:30 p.m. at First Parish Church 
with a talk on "The Role of 
Newspapers in the Formation of 

Rev. Bertil Hult 

The Rev. Bertil E. Hult, 
pastor of Salem Lutheran 
Church, is hospitalized in New 



Public Opinion." 

The Quincy Community 
Forum is designed to provide the 
people of Quincy with an 
opportunity to exchange ideas 
on important issues of the day. 
There will be a question period 
after each talk. 

Hospital Patient 

England Deaconess Hospital in 
Boston. 





NEWSIOYS WANTED 
Here's s chance to earn extra 
money by building. • Quincy 
Sua home delivery route. 

Telephone: 471 3100 



326 COPELAND STREET 
W. QUINCY 



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Telephone 771-2721 



MEMORIAL GIFTS 



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Quincy Band 
Parents Thank 
86 More Donors 



Thursday, January 1 1 , 1973 Quincy Sun Page 9 



Quincy business and 
professional men and women 
contributed $5,295 to send 
the Quincy High School Band 
to Dallas for the New Year's 
Day Cotton Bowl Parade, the 
Band Parents Committee has 
announced. 

In additon to the 86 who 
contributed $2,339 
previously acknowledged, and 
listed in the Quincy Sun, the 
following 96 contributors 
added $2,956 to the total: 

$100 OR MORE 

Remick's 

Shipbuilders Co-operative 

Bank 

Quincy Public School 

Custodians 
Hancock Bank 
Fr. John J. McMahon 
Quincy Savings Bank 
South Shore National 

Bank 

Quincy Sons of Italy 
Norfolk County Trust 
Yellow Cab of Quincy 
Quincy Education 

Association 
Boston Gas Co. 



$50 OR MORE 

South Shore Friends of 
Ireland 

Quincy Lodge of Elks 

Mayor Walter Hannon 

Koch Club 

Fore River Motors 

Quincy Fire Fighters 
Association 

ALL OTHERS 

Wollaston Legion Post 295 
Milton's 

South West Community 
Council 

Scott Furniture 
Copeland Auto Body 
Alfredo's Restaurant 
Class of 1941 
Dr. Charles Djerf 
Walter Graf 
President Taxi 
Sears, Roebuck & Co. 
Keohane Funeral Home 
Walter & Esther Nisula 
Bethany Women's Union 
Grahn's Bakery 
Whites Ice Inc. 
Marsto Machine 
President Press 
De-cha Inc. 
Quincy Memorial Co. 
West Granite & Polishing 



The Body Smith Shop 

Allen T. Miller Inc. 

Brondis Service Center 

Dr. Martin Rutberg 

Crescent Shade & Screen 

Harding Welding 

South Boston Savings 
Bank 

Atlantic Fence 

Southern Artery Shell 

David Ring 

A & P Stores 

Salem Lutheran Church 

Industrial Heat Treating 

Quincy Pediatric 
Association 

Charles Rizzo Hair Styles 

Aiello Italian Foods 

Estes Jewelers 

Parts Oil Service Inc. 

Dr. John A. McGowan 

Wickens & Troupe 

Gallagher News 

Harp & Bard of Norwood 

Quincy Legion Post 95 

Mary A. McCue, Class of 
'17 

Dr. Alfred Mahoney 

Joseph Shea 

Richard Newcomb 

Richard McCormick 

Ralph Maier 

Geoffrey Davidson 

John Cattaneo 

Dennis O'Leary 

William Grindlay 

Roberta's Fashion Shoppe 

Houghs Neck Community 
Council 

Sherry's Restaurant 

M & C Co. 

Charles B. Bosworth Co. 

Quincy Screw Products 
Co. 

Francis X. McCauley, 
school committee 

Robert Hall Clothes 

Survival Inc. 

Willard School P.T.A. 

Our Lady of Good Council 
Sodality 

South Shore Buick 

Dr. George Molla 

Quincy Police Betterment 
Association 

Thelma D. Collins 

Clara E. Mac Lean 

Atherton Hough P.T.A. 

John M. Gillis, city clerk 

Dr.- Lawrence P. Creedon 

General Millwork & 
Lumber 

Anthony's Coiffures 

Kincaide Furniture Co. 

Houghs Neck Legion Post 
380 

Paul Kelly, school 
committee 



wooo o o o 




Health 
High-Lights 

By Jack Silverstein 
uuuuuuua a oci co onononn 



NURSES WANTED!!! 



"Nurses wanted", the ad says. 
The full-page appeal which 
appears in a great number of 
medical publications is yet 
another reminder of one of the 
nation's serious health personnel 
problems. 

Why are registered nurses in 
short supply - when their 
numbers, according to 
government figures, have been 
multiplying at a faster rate than 
the population? Despite the 
unprecedented growth of health 
workers within the past decade, 
the demand for medical care has 
fast outpaced our manpower 
resources. 

At the situation stands today, 
the country is still short 150,000 
nurses. Also contributing to the 
shortage have been the 



profession's high dropout rate. 

The reasons most frequently 
cited by nurses themselves have 
been low salaries, difficult 
working conditions, and the lack 
of scope of their duties. 
Fortunately, medical authorities 
are working hard to improve all of 
these areas. 

* * • 



This information has been 
brought to you as a public service 
by NABORHOOD PHARMACY, 
406 Hancock St, No. Quincy, 
where you can always count on 
friendly, professional service. 
Hospital equipment and supplies 
for rent or sale. Let us keep your 
prescription tax and insurance 
records. Phone: 773-6426. 



South Shore Television & Appl 



From 10 To 35% Off - And More 




Televisions 






Stereos 






MODEL 




REG. 


SALE 


MODULE STEREO 


REG. 


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ADMIRAL 




PRICE 


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UNITS MODEL 


PRICE 


PRICE 


COLOR TV 








Zenith A589 
C585 


249.95 
199.95 


192.44 
158.12 


23" Solar-Color 








R.C.A. VS1200 


149.95 


104.50 


Console 


3L3565 


529.95 


396.00 


Motorola PH200H 


99.95 


82.51 


25" Solar-Color 








FH210H 


179.95 


135.01 


Console 


5L5271 


589.95 


453.03 


Quadraline FH410 


275.95 


207.18 


25" Solar-Color 








Sylvania MS210 


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148.50 


Console 


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Console Stereo C920 
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16" Port Color 


ER362 


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265.03 


Stereo Needles 




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25" Color Console 


CL12U 


499.95 


420.20 


Diamond Needles 


9.95 


4.50 


25" Color Console 


CL1221 


499.95 


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19" Port Color D4034P 
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19" B/W-Remote 
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199.95 



89.95 



12" Portable D1335 

Washer & Dryers 

MODEL 



WEST1NGHOUSE 



REG. 
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DE17PPXG 219.95 



High ElecDryer 
Port ElecDryer 

110V DE200PXW 149.95 

Port Elec. Washer LS200PXW 199.95 

High Washer LT770PXG 319.95 

Front Load Washer LT570PXW 279.95 

Dishwashers 



175.94 



82.87 



SALE 
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169.22 

104.50 
159.50 
244.02 
213.40 



Refrigerators 



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CU22 



EWT17PW 
EWT17STY 



MODEL 


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WESTINGHOUSE SC450 


269.95 


220.00 


SC300 


219.95 


183.70 


SC150 


179.95 


152.90 


SUK3CX 


219.95 


170.50 



Electric Ranges 



MODEL 
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REG. 
PRICE 

489.95 



Gas Ranges 



MAKE 

R.C.A. Imperial 
R.C.A. Imperial 
R.C.A. Imperial 



MODEL 

PK670W 

PF2004 

PKF432 



REG. 
PRICE 

299.95 
129.95 
259.95 



SALE 
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435.60 



SALE 
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265.10 
103.40 
190.30 



Trashmashers 

MODEL 
WHIRLPOOL SXC400 

Eureka Vac. Cleaners 



REG. 
PRICE 
229.95 



SALE 
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187.55 



Complete line - 10% off 



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lOCu.Ft 

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17 Cu. ft 
17 Cu. ft 

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21 cu.ftSide-by- 

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14 cu.ft Freezer 



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RD14A7 



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379.95 
349.95 



549.95 



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219.95 
299.95 



Air Conditioners 

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8000 B.T.U. Air 

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5000 B.T.U. Air 

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9000 B.T.U. Air 

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AM5M3 149.95 

AS9M1 229.95 

AS7A3 219.95 

Snowblowers 



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Snowblower 
Snowblower 



REG. 
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55006 
55008 



399.95 
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Lawn Vacuum 



MODEL 
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Lawn Vac 



REG. . 
PRICE 

54001-784 229.95 



Air Rake 



MODEL 
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REG. 
PRICE 

239.95 



SR510 

Outdoor Grille 



SALE 
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129.80 



312.12 
284.35 



459.80 



SALE 
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151.80 
253.00 



SALE 
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198.00 
117.70 
180.75 
165.00 



SALE 
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346.50 
236.50 



SALE 
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167.70 



SALE 
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192.50 



MODEL 
Bake A Broil 

Outdoor Grille 54500 



REG. 
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125.00 



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99.82 



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Open Evenings 

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«—•<■»* 



m^mm 



Page 10 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 11 , 1973 



North Quincy High School NEWS 



Written by staff members of The North Star and other North students 



Trying To Change Things 

Student Leaders Draft 
'Rainy Day Proposal 9 



By PAUL GOSLIN 

Anyone who can make school 
a bit better to attend should be 
greeted with the praises of both 
<rudcnts and faculty. 

The student leaders at North 
Quincy H.S. have taken on this 
significanl task. They have 
written what they call the 
"Rainy Day Proposal". It is in 
reality six different proposals 
dealing with everything from 
student tutoring services to 
minor 1 elective courses. 

Certain parts of the proposal 
will be in operation within the 
next few weeks, but other parts 
will have to be further clarified 
before they become operational. 

The first part of the proposal 
has established minor elective 
courses for the students at 
North. These courses are 
intended to offer "a relevant 
curriculum (to] stimulate social 
concern by helping the 
individual understand the nature 
of our government, economy, 
society, and culture." 

These courses, which will be 
offered in additon to the regular 
curriculum, will be on a 
voluntary basis on the part of 
both teachers and students. No 
points will be awarded for 
participation, no marks will be 
given, and no attendance will be 
taken. The course will be 
developed by the teacher 
involved and a board of 
students, teachers, and 
administrators will oversee the 
program. 

The second section sets up a 
tutoring assistance program 
which will be run by the Junior 
Class at North. Everyday in one 
section of the building junior 
students will be available to 
assist ninth grade students with 
their subjects. In the future 
sophomores and seniors may 
participate in the teaching part 
of the program. 

The third part deals with the 
school boundaries. Presently 
students are limited to a small 



area in the back of the building 
to go out and have a cigarette or 
socialize in the good weather. 
The present area will be enlarged 
to accommodate the large 
number of- students who use this 
area. 

Part Four would enact a 
limited "Cut System". The 
proposal requested one cut per 
class per term. It stipulated that 
the teacher must be notified in 
advance and the decision was 
ultimately up to the teacher. 
This part is still in discussion. 

The fifth section establishes a 
Social Health Program. One day 
a month a "Health Day" would 
take place. Special speakers will 
be invited, films will be shown, 
rap sessions will be held and 
discussions will take place. Some 
days will be used for field trips 
to hospitals and drug centers. 
The students involved hope to 
be able to raise funds for special 
charities. In the future a drug 
and social health education will 
be held. 

Part Six is the most 
controversial part of the entire 
proposal. It must be brought to 
the Quincy Education 
Association for approval. In this 
part, teachers would write 
self-descriptions and student 
opinions in the form of per-cent 
of answers of certain questions 
would be determined. These 
things would be made available 
to students so that when they 
choose a course they may also 
pick a compatible teacher. This 
type of information is important 
to the aim of student-centered 
learning. 

With the exception of this 
last part and the cut system, 
North will see the changes in the 
near future. 

It seems that the "Rainy 
Day" is a great step forward in 
the co-operation and interaction 
of students, teachers, and 
administrators at North Quincy 
High School. 




SCENE from "Amal and the Night Visitors", staged by the North Quincy Concert Choir. Cast, shown 
here, includes Paul Goslin, David Poutree, Richard Meredith, Joseph Smongeski and Kathy Cronin. 

[Don Cameron Photo] 

Concert Choir Presents Opera 
'Amal And The Night Visitors' 



By JACKIE BANGS 

The latest endeavor of the 
North Quincy Concert Choir was 
the production of "Amal and 
the Night Visitors", an opera by 
Gian-Carlo Menotti. 

Produced by Maurice 
Carbonneau, a music teacher and 
director of Concert Choir at 
NQHS, the opera portrays the 
trek of three biblical kings who, 
on their way to the Christ child, 
encounter the crippled boy, 
Amal, and his widowed mother. 

In the true spirit of 
Christmas, young Amal is 
returned the use of his leg by a 



miracle evidently due to the 
birth of the Christ child. Amal 
leaves with the kings to bring a 
gift of the crutch to the 
newborn child. 

Playing the three kings are 
Paul Goslin, Richard Meredith 
and David Poutree. The principal 
characters are played by Kathy 
Cronin as Amal and Jill Casey as 
his mother. In the dancing 
segment of the play, the dancers 
are played by Robert Sheridan 
and Dianne Dunn. The page to 
the three kings is played by 
Joseph Smongeski. 

The musical accompanist is 
Mrs. Marion Clancy, music 



teacher at Atlantic Junior High 
School, and the student stage 
director is Mary Poole. 

The opera was presented to 
the public on Dec. 29 to a 
capacity crowd in North's 
auditorium, and the cast 
received a standing ovation. 

Also included in the 
presentation were selections of 
Benjamin Britten's "Ceremony 
of Carols" sung by the Girl's 
Concert Choir and selected 
Christmas carols by the Concert 
Choir. It has also been presented 
to Atlantic Junior High students 
and North Quincy students. 



This Page Is A New Feature For Quincy Sun Readers. Articles Are Written by 
North Quincy Students and Quincy High Students On Alternating Weeks 



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Thursday, January 1 1 , 1973 Quincy Sun Page 1 1 



• 'Have You Heard?' 



This feature will appear 
regularly on the NQHS page 
of The Quincy Sun every 
other week. 

Students mentioned in this 



column have either been 
accepted to colleges and 
universities or have accepted 
positions after graduation. 



[Gordon Parry Photos] 



SHARON WOODLEY of 33 
Janet Rd, has been accepted at 
Children's Hospital; Peter Bent 
Brigham Hospital and at Quincy 
City Hospital for Sept. 74. She 
plans to work for a year, and 
then go into Nurses' Training. 
Sharon has chosen to enter the 
nursing program at Children's 
Hospital in Boston. She will 
specialize in Pediatrics. 



LISA McELANEY, an associate 
member to the Quincy School 
Committee, has been accepted 
early decision to Bowdoin 
College, Brunswick, Me. As Lisa 
has been active in national, state, 
and local politics this last year 
she plans to major in political 
science in preparation for law 
school. 



A Student's Evaluation 

No. 1 Education Priority 
Should Be Motivation 



By MARK PETRACCA 

The reflection upon and 
observation of situations, values, 
and opportunities of a 
functioning society is one of the 
most important criteria for the 
improvement of society. 

It is with this philosophy that 
I shall attempt to evaluate the 
educational opportunities of the 
Quincy Public School System, in 
light of how it has treated me in 
the last 1 2 years. 

My one general observation 
about those opportunities is 
that, education to aspire, is 
available in the Quincy Public 
Schools. Talking not from what 
has been handed to me by the 
faculty or administration 
throughout my 12 years, but 
from what I have seen necessary 
to grasp, I find an unlimited 
supply of resources available for 
the students' use. 

Opponents of my overview, 
tell you that not all possible 
areas of curriculum are used, not 
all educational innovations are 
being fully utilized, and not all 
possible use of funds is being 
accomplished. 

I have no quarrel with these 
arguments. The system is, 
obviously, far from perfect. But 
the important factor in 
education slips by the realization 
of most of my opponents; that 
being, student attitude. 

l tend to think that, 
realistically, no one could deny 
that we do have the resources 
for almost any innovative course 
under the sun. Of course, not 
everyone's wish can be satisfied, 
nor do we have an infinite 



supply of funds to meet the 
material requirements for some 
new ideas. 

However, the combined 
resources of material, physical, 
and mental assets can indeed 
provide a superior level of 
education for every student. 

This fact of superiority can 
be seen in the achievements of 
individuals who have the desire 
to excel. From all levels of 
athletics, business, science, 
math, history, english, foreign 
language, speech, and student 
government, students in the 
Quincy schools have excelled. 

Why then do we have such a 
disparity in educational 
achievement? My answer refers 
to the most important factor in 
achievement, that of student 
attitude. It is with this factor 
that I rest any responsibility for 
any lack of achievement by 
students in this school system. 

It is not proper to end this 
analysis here, without offering a 
solution to the problem. 

One must remember that the 
changing of an attitude is not a 
spontaneous action. It could 
very well be that all the young 
people in Quincy will suffer 
from this lack of motivation, but 
that doesn't mean we shouldn't 
institute steps immediately to 
help future generations. 

I would suggest, in 
conclusion, that the number 
ONE priority for the future 
innovations should be that we 
achieve motivation. The 
opportunities for achievement 
are here in the school. It is up to 
the school and the community 
to provide motivation for the 
students that will perpetuate a 
boundless desire for knowledge. 



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WOLLASTON 



Mail Contributions . March Of Dimes Urges 



Dr. Arthur W. Trott of 
Wollaston, March of Dimes 
Campaign Director, today urged 
Quincy residents to keep at least 
one important New Year's 
resolution. 

"Please mail back that 
contribution appeal to our 
headquarters," he said. "Your 
check can help create a whole 



new life for one of the estimated 
250,000 infants born with 
significant birth defects every 
year in our country." 

Dr. Trott, noting the purpose 
of the January fund drive, 
added: 

"The March of Dimes is 
making a double-edged assault 
on birth defects at more than 



100 Birth Defects Centers 
around the country. Research 
into the causes, cures and 
prevention of these diseases will 
help tomorrow's children. 
Comprehensive care, provided 
by dedicated health 
professionals, meets the needs of 
families who cannot wait for 
tomorrow's discoveries." 



YMCA To Offer Guitar Instruction 



The Quincy YMCA will offer 
an Instructional Guitar Course 
to boys, girls or adults beginning 
Jan. 9. 

The 10 week course, geared 
for the beginner, will be taught 



by Paul Anderson, a member of 
a South Shore musical group. 
Each class will last one hour and 
those attending must supply 
their own instrument. 

Advance registration is 



Richard Cutler Enrolled At Bcrklee College 



Berklee College of Music, has 
enrolled Richard Cutler, son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Cutler of 
107 Standish Rd, Wollaston as a 
freshman in its mid-year class 
which commences Jan. 29. 

His curriculum will include 
courses in Arranging, 



Composition, Improvisation, 
S o 1 o . a n d Orchestral 
Performance, as well as courses 
in the Humanities. Upon 
graduation from Berklee, he will 
be qualified as a teacher, 
musician, arranger and 
composer. 



Frank Catalano On Duty In San Francisco 

Coast Guard Seaman Frank Rd, Wollaston, has reported for 
A. Catalano, son of Mr. and Mrs. duty at the Coast Guard Station 
Anthony Catalano of 86 Myopia in San Francisco, Calif. 



required and enrollment is 
limited. The age for youths 
beginning guitar lessons is 8 
years old. For further 
information call the YMCA at 
479-8500. 

James Stephens 
Returns From 
Mediterranean 

Petty Officer Third Class 
James A. Stephens, husband of 
the former Miss Jeanne M. 
Dunne of 78 Farrington St., 
Quincy, has returned to his 
homeport in Newport, R.I., after 
a six-month deployment to the 
Mediterranean aboard the 
destroyer escort USS Voge. 



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Page 1 2 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 1 1 , 1973 



'Completely Dedicated Priest* 

400 Honor Fr. John McMahon On 30th Anniversary 




MILESTONE - Rev. John J. McMahon, pastor of St. Mary's Church, West Quincy, is presented gift by 
Mrs. Gerald Kilcommons, committee member, at buffet dinner party given by parishioners in honor of 
Fr. McMahon's 30th anniversay in the priesthood. With them are Mayor Walter J. Hannon, one of the 
keynote speakers, Mrs. Mary Meady and Rev. Joseph Deacon, pastor St. Mary's Church, Scituate, a close 
friend of Fr. McMahon's. Some 400 attended the event held at the Chuich Social Hall. 



The parish of St. Mary's, the 
city of Quincy, and friends from 
as far away as New York 
honored Rev. John J. McMahon 
Sunday on the 30th anniversary 
of his ordination to the 
priesthood. 

Bishop Joseph F. Maguire of 
Brockton, former pastor of St. 
John's Church, Quincy, hailed 
Fr. McMahon as a "completely 
dedicated" priest. 

"To know we have a priest 
such as this among us is a great 
consolation," he added. 

Fr. McMahon has spent the 



[Quincy Sun Photo] 

last eight years, first as 
administrator, now as pastor, at 
St. Mary's Church, Crescent 
Street, West Quincy. 

About 450 guests attended 
Sunday's testimonial buffet 
dinner at the church hall for Fr. 
McMahon, who was ordained 
Jan. 6, 1943 in Boston's Holy 
Cross Cathedral by the then 
auxiliary Bishop Richard J. 
Cushing. 

Fr. McMahon received a 
Senate citation from Sen. Arthur 
Tobin [D-Quincyl, a silver Paul 
Revere Bowl from Mayor Walter 



J. Hannon, and a toy bank from 
Mrs. Gerald Killcommon on 
behalf of the parishioners. 

He also received a gift of 
money from the testimonial, 
which was the purpose of the 
toy bank. 

Also in attendance were the 
Rt. Rev. Msgr. John E. 
Mullarkey, the Rev. James 
Lonergan and the Rev. William 
Donovan, all of St. Mary's; 
Bishop Joseph F. Maguire of 
Brockton; the Rev. Joseph 
Deacon of St. Mary's Church, 
Scituate. 



DAY Seeks Vietnam Veterans Bonus 



"An immediate resumption 
of the bonus payments to those 
who have been in the Armed 
Forces during the Vietnam War 




is our major Legislative objective 
in Massachusetts this year", says 
Massachusetts Department DAV 
Commander William A. Tabb of 
Everett. 



"We intend to do all in our 
power to have the Legislature 
appropriate sufficient funds to 
resume payments to those who 
have served their country and to 
do it immediately," he declared. 

The first meeting of the DAV 



Executive Committee in 1973 
will be held Jan. 1 3 at 1 p.m. at 
the State House. Joseph R. 
Harold of Quincy, DAV State 
Adjutant and Legislative Officer 
will outline the organization's 
positions on bills that will be 
acted on by the Massachusetts 
Legislature. 

The DAV will oppose all 
efforts to reduce Veteran 
Benefits and will support action 
that will revert Veterans Day to 
Nov. 11. 



We can't pull the plug 

on people who want a 

better way of living. 



\%s *■ nsy Jo Sii v we have all the 
appliances we'll ever need. And 
a) 1 the electricity we'll ever need 
to run thorn. Easy for the 

haves" Bu \ how about the 

hu'e-nots"? 

1 k i v , urban renewal and 
redf "xt'lnr ment programsare 
I nging j icw hope to thousands 
oi \ew England families. And 

- fth ii new standards of living. 

This means more of the 
little everyday conveniences 
most of us take for granted. 
More refrigerators. More ranges. 
More washers and drvers. All 



requiring more electricity. 

That's why we're working 
now to provide the kind of gen- 
erating facilities that will best 
meet these growing demands 
and still satisfy our common 
environmental concerns. It can 
mean a better way of living. 
Tor all of us. 

People like you working to 
make life a little better. 



MASSACHUSETTS 
ELECTRIC 





BISHOP Joseph F. Maguire, former pastor of St. John's Church, 
Quincy, congratulates Rev. John J. McMahon, pastor of St. Mary's 
Church, West Quincy, at buffet dinner party given by parishioners 
honoring the latter on his 30th anniversary in the priesthood. With 
them is Leo F. Meady, committee chairman. 

[Quincy Sun Photo] 



City Councillors J. Vincent 
Smythe, Joseph LaRaia, 
Theophilus McLelland and 
Albert R. Barilaro; State Reps. 
William Delahunt [D-Quincy] 
and Joseph Brett [D-QuincyJ; 
former Mayor James R. 
Mclntyre. 

County Commissioner George 
McDonald; Joseph Shea, the 
mayor's secretary; City Clerk 
John Gillis; City Treasurer 
Robert Foy. 

Several telegraphed greetings 



were read from. clergymen who 
could not make the dinner, 
including the Most Rev. James 
Mahoney, vicar general of the 
New York diocese and a 
frequent visitor to St. Mary's 
parish. 

A native of Brockton, Fr. 
McMahon was graduated from 
Boston College in 1938 and 
entered St. John's Seminary the 
same year. He served parishes in 
Canton, Lowell, Weymouth, 
Dorchester and Plymouth before 
coming to St. Mary's. 



Louis Cassani Chairman 
Past Commanders Club 



Louis S. Cassini has been 
elected chairman of the Quincy 
Veterans Council Past 
Commanders Club. 

Other officers elected include 
Charles N. Ross, vice chairman; 
Allen A. Kofman, adjutant; 
Thomas M. McDonald, assistant 
adjutant; Lawrence J. Perette, 
treasurer and public relations 



WATCH A 

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WORKING 
ON 

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10-2 



officer. 

Members of the executive 
board elected were Thomas B. 
Hanrahan, Paul W. O'Neill, Peter 
Stonis and Arthur L. Senter. 

Installation will take place 
April 10 at the Officers Club at 
the Naval Air Station in South 
Weymouth with Arthur L. 
Senter installing officer. 



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■ 



at Thomas Crana Public Library 



Thursday, January 1 1 , 1973 Quincy Sun Page 1 3 




Between 
the Covers 



The reviews for this column 
are by Miss Linda Beeler of the 
Inter-library Loan Department. 
She very wisely selected several 
titles to begin with that many 
people should read after their 
holiday indulgences. 

Number one on the list is 
LIVING WITH YOUR ULCER, 
by Theodore Berland and 
Mitchell A. Spellberg [St. 
Martin's Press. $5.95] This 
covers all aspects of ulcers: wh^t 
they are, where they are and 
why they are; danger signals to 
watch for and the pros and cons 
of various medications [brand 
names are given J . The book tells 
how your ulcer should affect 
your daily life, and includes as a 
special appendix "The Ulcerous 
Gourmet" which features tasty 
recipes to relieve the drabness of 
the usual ulcer diet 

If bulges are your problem we 
offer SLIMNASTICS by Pamela 
Nottidge and Diana Lamplugh 
[St. Martin's Press. $4,951 
which is a new approach to the 
problem of weight control, 
consisting of graded exercises, 
diet and beauty care. Courses to 
suit everyone from teenagers to 
grandmothers are planned to be 
enjoyable and progressive at 
every level! 

If you think a vegetarian diet 
would be uninteresting, do 
yourself a favor and read THE 
GEORGE BERNARD SHAW 
VEGETARIAN COOK BOOK 
[Taplinger. $5.95) It is by Alice 
Laden who was Shaw's long-time 
cook and housekeeper. _She 
presents the favorite vegetarian 
dishes of this famous playwright. 
Many elegant desserts, as well as 
tasty natural food main courses, 
are described, accompanied by 
numerous witty drawings. 



Tired of the rush? Curl up 
with a good book: IN SEARCH 
OF DRACULA; a True History 
of Dracula and Vampire 
Legends, by Raymond McNally 
and Radu Florescu [New York 
Graphic Society. $8.95 j Two 
scholars, Boston College faculty 
members who specialize in 
Eastern European history, reveal 
the findings of a ten year 
investigation of Prince Dracula. 
They delve into the history of 
both the real and the fictional 
Dracula and analyze vampirism 
in all its forms: legend, 
literature, film - and reality. The 
story of the most fearsome living 
vampiress of all time, Elizabeth 
Bathory, is told in gruesome 
-detail. 

Our first book on a timely 
subject is THE LAYMAN'S 
GUIDE TO ACUPUNCTURE, by 
Yoshio Manaka and Ian A. 
Urquhart. [Wetherhill. $6.95] 
Two leading authorities present 
a concise introduction to the 
concepts underlying the 5,000 
year old science, various 
treatment procedures, and some 
interesting recent experiments 
testing the empirical results of 
acupuncture according to 
scientific standards. 



THE WAKE [Doubleday. 
$5.95] by TV personality Steve 
Allen is a frequently humorous 
but essentially sad story of the 
emotions which emerge as long 
separated family members gather 
at the wake of their eighty-six 
year old mother. Each character 
subconsciously seeks love and 
understanding, but all attempts 
at communication end only in 
frustration and bitterness. 



William O'Brien President 
Quincy Citizens Association 



William J. O'Brien of 162 
Elliott Ave., Montclair was 
installed Wednesday night as 
piesident of the Quincy Citizens 
Association at a meeting at 
Montclair Men's Club. 



Also installed were James J. 
Vey, 1 1 Ruthven St., Montclair, 
vice president; J. Thomas 
Mullaney, 1 15 Standish Ave., 
Wollaston. treasurer; and 
Dorothy C. Kelly, 108 Davis St., 
Wollaston, secretary. 



CROSSWORD PUZZLE 



ACROSS 

1. Assail 
6. Place of 
worship 

11. Imbue with 
Joy 

12. Garry or 
Victor 

11 Words of 
encourage- 
ment 

16. Unclose 
(poet) 

16. Knightly 
title 

17. Mythical 
founder of 
London 

11. Three lines 

of verse 
SO. Abject 

21. Fermented 
potable 

22. Solar disk 
28. Brisk 

25. Chief 
executive: 
abbr. 

26. Father 
ST. Droop 

28. Chinese port 
28. Sermonise 
SS. Russian 

village 
St. "Aunt" la 

Tijuana 

85. Hawaiian 
fame 

86. Improvise: 



DOWN 

1. Stupefy, as 
with drink 

2. Wed "on 
the run" 

3. Less risky 

4. Pilot's ab- 
breviation 

5. With con- 
ciseness 

6. "LOve" in 
Spain 

7. Ship's 
record 

8. Untimely 
(2wds.) 

9. Excites 
10. Blush 
14. Location 



is. Actor, Today's Answer 

Mac- 

donald 



BDHPaHDOISJCBPl 

dps nun nor 

3EERBS qgoq 

nnn boob 

BBSS DEF1H 
3BD0 BOO 

eann pbbebo 
BfflB nnn BEE 

EraERHBBnBRR 
BPIPJPin BPDBS 
aOOfcD CTBRBI;! 



20. Canal- 
boat 

23. Akin 

24. Propor- 
tion- 
ately 
(2wds.) 

25. Biblical 
story 

26. Speci- 
. men 

27. Barbe- 
cue rod 

30. In 
front 



31. Call a 
stop 

32. Employed 
34. Weary 

37. "Out," 
translated 

38. Longing 



(4wds.) 
38. Subse- 
quently 

40. Let 

41. Expunge 
4S. Terminated 



l" 2 5 4 S gb 7 » ^ 10 




i==?==|!=== 


1 - J- ,j 




1" 


■*» m*t 



AFL-CIO Seeks Scholarship Applicants 



All seniors in public and 
parochial high schools in 
Massachusetts are invited to 
participate in the scholarship 
awards program conducted by 
the Massachusetts State Labor 
Council, AFL-CIO. 



There are $20,000 in 
scholarships, including a $1,000 
scholarship in memory of the 
late President John F. Kennedy 
and a $1,000 scholarship named 
in memory of Francis E. 
Lavigne, former Director of the 
Massachusetts State Labor 
Council. 



Other awards given by 
affiliates of the council are in 
amounts ranging from $100 to 
$500. 

High school seniors must file 
application in their respective 
high schools prior to March 21. 
An examination will be given in 
all high schools April 4. The 
examination is comprised of a 
series of questions dealing with 
the subject of labor in the 
United States. The two-hour 
examination will also include an 
essay about Labor and related 
matters. 

John A. Callahan, Director of 
COPE and Education for the 



Massachusetts State Labor 
Council is expecting 
substantially more senior boys 
and girls to participate in the 
1973 awards program than have 
in the previous years. Callahan 
noted a greater interest on the 
part of young people seeking 
financial aid to help defray the 
costs of higher education. 

Examination study kits are 
being forwarded to high schools 
throughout the state during 
January and all seniors 
contemplating participation 
should notify the proper 
authorities at their school. 



Harold Davis Named Chamber 
Economic Development Group Manager 



Atty. Harold R. Davis, 28, of 
Quincy, will join the staff of the 
South Shore Chamber of 
Commerce as Manager, 
Economic Development Group, 
Jan. IS, it was announced by 
Chamber Executive 
Vice-President Eric Swider. 

Davis, a Quincy School 
committeeman was formerly 
associated with the Boston law 
firm of Ropes and Cray. 

Davis' experience in legal 
matters, with emphasis on 
corporate and public law 
problems, "extremely well suits 
him to this new post." 

Davis will have chamber staff 
responsibility for implementing 
programs recently outlined in 
the 1973 Program of Work 
under the Economic 
Development Group section. 



He will work closely with 
local Industrial Develop me at 
Commissions to help strengthen 
their ability to attract new jobs 
to their communities by 
counseling them on promotion, 
organization, and utilization of 
legal mechanisms available to 
them through state, federal, and 
private agencies. 

He will provide staff 
assistance to incorporate and 
manage a non-profit economic 
development corporation which 
shall have the capability of 
providing financial assistance to 
firms that can provide additional 
jobs to our area. 



A magna cum laude graduate 
of Bowdoin College. Davis 
received a law degree from 



Georgetown University in 1969. 
He was admitted to the 
Massachusetts Bar in 196V. He is 
a member of the American, 
Massachusetts, and Norfolk 
County Bar Associations. During 
1971 he was a Contributor to 
the ABA report on Local 
Government. 

Besides his membership on 
the Quincy School Committee, 
he is a director of the Southeast 
Massachusetts Heart Association, 
a curator of the Quincy 
Historical Society, and a 
member of The Quincy 
Committee for Better Judges. 

He is married to the former 
Kathleen Roberta Smith and 
lives at 51 Presidential Drive. 
Quincy. 





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Page 14 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 1 1 , 1973 



World War U'$ 'Blue Ghost' 



Quincy-Built Lexington Comes Home In New Role 



The Quincy-built USS 
Lexington (CVT-16), oldest 
aircraft carrier in commission, 
arrived at the South Boston 
Annex of the Boston Naval 
Shipyard Monday, to a 
rousing reception. 

Known as the "Blue 
Ghost" in World War II - the 
ship that couldn't be sunk - 
she will observe her 30th 
birthday at the same pier 
where she was commissioned 
Feb. 17, 1943. 

Commanded by Captain 
Charles C. Carter, USN, a 
native of Pasadena, Calif., the 
aircraft <-arrier, now used to 
train pilots, was given a warm 
wefcofM by the Boston Naval 
B.,sc Band and boats of the 
Bos Urn Fire Department as 
she entered Boston Harbor. 
Lexington town officials and 
Quincy Mayor Walter J. 
Hannon extended greetings. 
Mayor Hannon presented a 
Paul Revere Bowl to the ship 
on behalf of Quincy 
residents. The carrier was 
built from the keel up at the 
then Bethlehem Steel Co.'s 
Fore River Shipyard and 
launched in 1942. 

Captain J. Lawrence Kelly, 
USNR, presented Captain 
Carter a Paul Revere Patriots 
scroll on behalf of Governor 
Francis Sargent. 

Fire Chief Walter F. 
Spellman, one of the 
Lexington officials at the 
"welcoming home", is a 
former World War II crew 
member of the Lexington. 

On board the carrier when 
she arrived were 36 military 
dependents including 11 
children ranging from 11 
months to 12 years of age. 

The Lexington will he in , 
Boston for an 11 -week stay. 
While in drydock, she will 
unJergo underwater hull 
refinishing, partial installation 
of cooling equipment for 
central air conditioning, 
replacement of rudder post 
bearings, internal 
preservation, repair and 
installation of other ship's 
equipment which cannot be 
done during normal 
underway or at Pensacola, 
Fla., during in-port periods. 
The carrier has been a 
training carrier for naval 
aviators out of Pensacola, her 
homeport on the Gulf Coast. 

Total cost of work to be 
done on the Lexington is 
$L 300,000 and is expected 
to consume 174,000 man 
hours. 

The LEXINGTON 
tradition is deep, starting in 
17 7 5 with the first 
LEXINGTON, an 86-foot 
brig, to today's 910-foot 
carrier. There have been five 



ships named LEXINGTON. 

Prior to 1942, 
LEXINGTON was a name 
primarily linked with the 
Revolutionary War, and the 
farmers of that town who 
fired the "shot heard 'round 
the world". 

While the fourth 

LEXINGTON [CV-2] fought 

off the attacking Japanese 

planes in the South Pacific, a 

hull, destined to be a carrier, 

sat in the Fore River 

Shipyard. When word was 

received concerning the 

sinking of CV-2, 23,000 

workers at the shipyard 

united and, in a telegram to ■ 

Frank Knox, then Secretary 

of the Navy, requested that 

the designated USS CABOT 

be christened LEXINGTON. 

The telegram explained that 

in 1925, the CV-2 was built 

at the Fore River Shipyard 

and that the loss of that ship 

was personal to those who 

had worked on her and were 

still employed there. 

On the following day a 
"permission-granted" 
telegram was returned. Four 
months later, one year ahead 
of schedule, the new carrier 
slid down the ways, her 
builders eager to avenge the 
death of her namesake. 

LEXINGTON attained 
that revenge in her many 
wartime exploits. By war's 
end, she had destroyed more 
than 850 enemy planes, sunk 
300,000 tons of Japanese 
shipping and damaged 
another 600,000 tons. The 
LEX became the symbol of 
the carrier fight in the Pacific. 
To the allies, she was a vital 
link in the Free World's fight; 
to the enemy she was the 
"BLUE GHOST" - the ship 
that couldn't be sunk. 



,/.. 



After I . k war 
LEXINGTON 'was placed in 
the Reserve Fleet at 
Bremerton, Wash. With the 
new Communist threats in 
the Far East in the early 
1950's, LEXINGTON was 
re commissioned in August, 
1955. Complete with a new 
angled flight deck and other 
modern improvements, 
LEXINGTON returned to her 
old battlegrounds with the 
Seventh Fleet, to help 
preserve world peace. 

From 1955 to May 1962, 
LEXINGTON alternated 
between Far East 
deployments and West Coast 
carrier qualifications for fleet 
pilots. 

On July 23, 1962, 
LEXINGTON departed San 
Diego, rounded Cape Horn, 
and entered Atlantic waters 
for the first time since her 
commissioning in 1943. She 



£r*«*i •*. 



r%t 



— *« 



was the tirst carrier to 
conduct flight operations in 
the stormy waters off the 
Horn. 



On Oct 
L E X I N G 

redesignated 
she was an 



. 1, 1962, 
TON was 
CVS-16. Now 
anti-submarine 



QUINCY Built USS Lexington [CVT-16], now a training aircraft carrier, steams to Boston for 

an 1 1-week stay and a $1,300,000 overhaul. 

S2A [S2F] "Tracker", a 
twin-engine propeller-driven, 
anti-submarine aircraft. 

The importance of 
LEXINGTON'S mission can 
readily be understood when 
one considers that already 
almost half of all naval 
officers are pilots, and that 
the demand is increasing. 
Each year she qualifies an 
average of 2,000 new pilots. 
LEXINGTON became leader 
of the world in the number of 
arrested landings on April 29, 
1966, when she became the 
first carrier to reach the 
152,000th mark. She has not 
given up that lead having 
passed a historic 250,000th 
mark and is well on her way 
to the 300,000th landing. 

In addition to her primary 
mission of conducting carrier 
qualifications, LEXINGTON 
is prepared to render aid to 
natural disaster victims, as the 
training carrier has done in 
the Gulf of Mexico area. She 
is capable of providing 
medical and sanitation 
assistance as well as 
foodstuffs and other supplies 
to stricken communities in 
case of any unusual 
emergency. 



aircraft carrier, but her 
mission was training pilots for 
the fleet. 

The Cuban missile crisis in 
late October, 1962 sent her 
to the Florida coast. As 
negotiations proceeded, in an 
attempt to ease the Cuban 
tension, LEXINGTON 
continued to operate off the 
Florida coast until the crisis 
finally relaxed. 

Since 1962, LEXINGTON 
has had one primary mission - 
the qualification and training 
of carrier pilots. So important 
is the mission, that on July 1 , 
1969, at the Boston Naval 
Shipyard, LEXINGTON was 
again re-designated. As 
CVT-16, she is the U.S. 
Navy's only training carrier. 

Today the LEXINGTON is 
one of the primary public 
affairs ships in the Navy. 
LEXINGTON operates a 
civilian guest cruise program 
which acquaints members of 
civic, profe ssional, 
educational, military, and 
religious organizations from 
all over the country [and a 
few foreign countries] with 
every facet of shipboard life. 

Rarely does LEXINGTON 
go to sea without one or 
more groups of visitors 
aboard, and during in-port 
periods she/ opens her 
gangways, daily, to throngs of 
local visitors who are escorted 
through selected areas of the 
ship. 

The ability of naval 
aviators to originate their 
"strikes" from a floating, 



mobile landing field and then 
return to it in a pre-arranged 
location, makes them unique 
among modern-day fliers. 
During their basic training at 
NAS Pensacola, the students 
spend many long, hard hours 
preparing for this duty. 
LEXINGTON provides them 
with an opportunity to put 
into practice what they have 
learned. Their arrested 
landings aboard this carrier 
are the high point of their 
training and successful 
completion gives them great 
confidence. 

Here at Pensacola, 
LEXINGTON is under the 
operational control of the 
Chief of Naval Air Training. 
The ship conducts carrier 
qualification landings and 
launchings for basic students 
in the T-28C "Trojan", a 
propeller-driven training 
aircraft, and the T2B/C 
"Buckeye", a multi-engine jet 
trainer. In addition, 
LEXINGTON provides day 
and night carrier 
qualifications for the A6 
"Intruder", A4 "Skyhawk", 
A7 "Corsair II", and the B2B 
"Hawkeye" aircraft for fleet 
replacement pilots training 
for both the U.S. Atlantic 
and Pacific fleets. 



Approximately every three 
weeks LEXINGTON crosses 
the Gulf of Mexico and 
operates in the vicinity of 
Corpus Christi, Texas, where 
she is under the operational 
control of the Chief of Naval 
Air Advanced Training. 
There,, advanced students are 
qualified in the TF9-J 
[F9F-8] "Cougar", a 
single-engine, swept- wing jet 
trainer, the T A4-J 
"Skyhawk", a jet aircraft; the 



By discharging her 
responsibilities as a training 
carrier for fleet and future 
fleet pilots, LEXINGTON 
fulfills her role in building a 
strong foundation on which 
to support the United States' 
foreign policy. 

As evidenced by her roles 
in Formosa, Laos, Cuba and 
now Pensacola, LEXINGTON 
is a can-do and a will-do ship. 
Her modern-day 
"Minutemen" have proven 
themselves worthy 
descendants of the illustrious 
Massachusetts patriots whose 
battleground gave 
LEXINGTON her name. 



Clear, Sand Sidewalks After Snow , Help Save Your Letter Carrier 



Postmaster George K. Walker Boston Postal District to clean 
a pp. <ils lo customers of the and sand their sidewalks and 




SOVTX SRQftl miwwir.jimimi 

FACTORY SERVICE 



1PJL 



RCAMOTOROLA-SYLVANIA- 
ZFNITH ADMIRAL-WHIRLPOOL 

WEST1NGHOUSE 
Call 479-1350 



stairs as soon as possible after a 
storm to reduce the hazards 
associated with inclement 
weather. 

"These injuries cause lost 



work time, disabling injuries, 
and also a tremendous amount 
of suffering to the letter carrier, 
in addition to financial loss to 
the Postal Service and to the 



[S arson A Cf Kichardion 

INSURANCE AGENCY 
INC. 



'Be Sure Now-Not Sorry Latei 
Robert W. Richardson 

PResident 3-1276 



Opposite Quincy 
Center MBTA 



«k 



taxpayers," he said. 

The cost in New England 
alone last year was well over 
$1 20,000, with approximately 
1 ,400 carriers injured. 

"Please be kind to your 
mailman if you care to have 
your mail delivered. Thank you 
for your cooperation," Walker 
said. 



lO.yL/.vJ.U. 

200 gals. $31.80 

150 gals. $2535100 gals. $17.90 

24 Hour Service Quality Fuels 

TONY'S OIL 337-2798 



Brownell Asks More 
Shipbuilding For Quincy, State 



Thursday, January 1 1 , 1973 Quincy Sun Page 15 



37 Pints Of Blood Donated 



Rep. Thomas F. Brownell 
[D-Q.uincyl has filed a resolve 
with the state legislature asking 
the President and Congress to 
"take all possible steps necessary 
and proper to curb the decline in 
shipbuilding in Massachusetts." 

Brownell said t hat 
Massachusetts has not received 
its fair share of government 
shipbuilding contracts and he is 
deeply concerned that the 
Boston Naval Shipyard is to be 
phased out. 

"If this is allowed to 
happen," he said, "the Port of 
Boston will be relegated to 
becoming a fishing hamlet and 
the shipbuilding industry in 



Massachusetts will suffer 
irreversible decline." 

In addition to the problem 
with the government, Brownell 
said, men are quietly being laid 
off at the General Dynamics 
shipyard in Quincy despite the 
fyct that the yard has received a 
major private contract. 

The Brownell resolution asks 
the President and Congress "to 
take appropriate action to 
stabilize, promote and insure the 
continued existence and 
prosperity of the shipbuilding 
industry in Massachusetts which 
is vital to both our economy and 
national defense." 



Mrs. Mildred Ambrosia, 
acting Blood Donor chairman 
for the Greater Quincy Red 
Cross, announces that 37 pints 
of blood were donated recently 
when the blood mobile visited 
Red Cross chapter headquarters. 

Those giving were: 

SUPSHIP - U.S.NAVY - Carl 
F. Caefer, Patrick J. Conroy, 
Anthony J. Graceffa, Charles E. 
Hancock, Thomas L. Johnson, 
Raymond J. King, Isadore I. 
Shulman. 

THE PATRIOT LEDGER - 
James W. Alleva, George 
Connors, Gerald A. Ford, Pete 
Lock wood. 

S. H. COUCH CO. - Joseph 



Aliberti, Leo Cass, Thomas 
Reidy, John P. Zinkus. 

BRAINTREE LIGHT CO. - 
Roger A. Lothrop, Eugene 
Tolman. 

QUINCY POST OFFICE - 
Henry Downey, Robert A. 
McKinnon, Charles Silya. 

PROCTOR & GAMBLE - 
Gustave H. Spurr. 

DRAKE BAKERIES -Joseph 
Perna. 

WEYMOUTH ART 
LEATHER CO. - Michael S. 
Jacob. 

RURAL LODGE - Dot 
O'Brion. 

SOCIAL SECURITY - Carol 



Isaacson. 
Dean A. 



Five Residents Enrolled 
In Wentworth Evening Division 



SSAT Tests Set At Thayer 



Five Quincy students have 
enrolled at Wentworth College 
of Technology, Boston for the 
1972-73 academic year. 

They are registered in a 
program 1 eading to a 
baccalaureate degree in 
Engineering Technology. They 
are: 

Quincy Aft 
Association To 
See Slides Jan. 16 

The Quincy Art Association 
will meet at the Woodward 
School for Girls, Quincy, Jan. 16 
at 8 p.m. 

Joseph Rooney will give a 
talk illustrated with slides. 



Sickroom 







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illness? SICKROOM SER- 
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your convalescence a # little 
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You are a 
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472 till 472 7180 



John M. DiCesare, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Ralph DiCesare, 32 
Francis Ave. 

Joseph N. Gildea Jr., son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph N. Gildea, 
45 Division St. 

Peter E. Lannon, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Howard E. Lannon, 
836 Sea St. 

John M. O'Brien, 151 Monroe 
Road. 

Stephen P. Shaw, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Arthur Shaw Jr., 53 
Mears Ave. 



The Secondary School 
Admission Test [SSATl for 
students interested in applying 
to Thayer Academy will be given 
at the Academy March 10 and 
May 12. 

Closing date for registration 
with the Educational Testing 
Service at Princeton, N.J., for 
the March 10th test is Feb. 16th. 

Students may obtain 
registration forms for these tests 
and information concerning 



admission by telephoning 
Thayer Academy [843-3580]. 
Those interested in admission to 
grade 9 should contact the 
Headmaster's office. Those 
interested in admission to grades 
10-12 should contact the 
Assistant Headmaster's office. 

Scholarships are available for 
those who qualify. Those 
interested should contact the 
Assistant Headmaster's office for 
details. 



Gibbons. 

NORTH QUINCY KNIGHTS 
OF COLUMBUS - Peter P. 
Dravinskas. 

QUINCY KNIGHTS OF 
PYTHIAS - Harvey A. Turr. 

REPLACEMENTS - Ann M. 
Anoier, John T. Bissett, Ruth 
Monroe. 

OTHERS - Nicholas 
Albanese, Nancy J. Battista, 
Kathleen Doherty, Dorothy 
Martine, Jeffrey J. 
Beverly Albanese, 
Larson. 

Mrs. Ambrosia was assisted 
by Marie McCaw, Gladys 
Kingman, Tess Harcourt, and 
Helen Ottaviani. 

Robert KHroy 
Marine 
Recruit Grad 

Marine Pvt. Robert J. Kilroy 
Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert 
J. Kilroy Sr. of 42 Tyler St., 
North Quincy, has graduated 
from basic training at the Marine 
Corps Recruit Depot at Parris 
Island, S.C. 

He is a 1972 graduate of Don 
Bosco Technical High School, 
Boston. 





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All trips must be taken within 6 months of drawing. No cash allowances 
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AT YOUR CO-OPERATIVE 
BANKS IN QUINCY 



■WS 



Page 16 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 1 1 , 1973 



mam 




\\$ 



Unedited selections from the writings of Quincy's elementary school children 





RESILUTION 

Mi knew yeers Resilution iz 
that I will spel beter in klass this 
yeer and all yeers and I wil be 
neat az a pin. 

Charles Romano 

Willard School 

grade 5 

MY M:\V YEARS RESOLUTIOM 

I will iiake a better New 
Y««r* ResoUition next year! 

Jane Righini 

Willard School 

Grade 5 

MY NEW YEARS RESOLUTION 

I will not throw snowballs at 
vars. 

Richard Ryan 

Willard School 

Grade 5 

MY NEW YEARS RESOLUTION 

I will not talk when the 
teacher is talking because it 
would be bad to talk when other 
people are talking. 

Debbie Aluisy 

Willard School 

Grade 5 

MY NEW YEARS RESOLUTION 

I am going to stop chewing 
gum. Because. Everytime I go in 
the door with gum in my mouth, 
my mother sends me to the 
rubbish barrel to spit out my 
gum and then she reminds mc 
about the dentist. 

Donna Ekbom 
Willard School 
Grade 5 
SaNTA AND THE DEMONS 

The demons wanted to take 
over Christmas because they 
didn't want any of the kids to 
get any toys. So they had to find 
a way to stop Santa from giving 
the toyf to the kids. One guy 
said, "iet's kidnap Santa. No," 
said the captain. Then the 
captain spread the word to lock 
all doors and windows so Santa 
wouldn't be able to give the kids 
toys. Santa heard their plan. He 
didn't forget about about the 
chimneys so he climbed to the 
rooftops and delivered all the 
toys down the chimneys. 

Bobby Heffernan 
Atherton Hough School 
Grade 4 
ON CHRISTMAS DAY 

On Christina* day we go out 
t ■) play when the snow falls, just 
iike hay. 

Richard Montello 
Snug Harbor School 

CHRISTMAS DAY 

Chris, mas day 
I open the Toys 
And presents too 
I jump for joy 



MY NEW YEARS RESOLUSION MY NEW YEARS RESOLUTION 



Ink. 



,i> p:j;cntsso 
j ou? 

i'aul Cook 

Snug Harbor School 

Grade 3 



CHRISTMAS STOCKING 

I very Christmas morning, the 
ursf thing that I do is look inside 
ir.y stocking and cat an apple or 
»*o. "Pierc's candy canes and 
yummies, and lots of things to 
•ai. And when I've eaten all of 
it, my Christmas Day's 
complete! 

Paula Roach e 

Atherton Hough School 

Grade 4 



I am going to be a better 
Athlete. Why? Because I want to 
run faster and learn how to play 
baseball, football and other 
games real good. 

Mark Westland 

Willard School 

Grade 5 




NEW YEARS RESOLUTION 

My new years resolution is, 
cutting down on chocolate, and 
then I will have a few dollars 
left, and then I can buy lots of 
candy. So next year I will eat 
lots of chocolate not candy. 

Kathee Kleimola 
Willard School 
Grade 5 
MY NEW YEARS RESOLUTION 

I am going to be a better 
student in school. Because, when 
I am a better student I do better 
work and get higher marks. 

Denise Earle 

Willard School 

Grade 5 



MY RESOLUTION 

My Resolution is to be a 
better sailor so I can beat my 
brother and win the race so I can 
win first place. 

Tom Wye 
Willard School ' 
Grades 
THE MAGIC CHRISTMAS BELL 

Once upon a time there was a 
boy name torn. He went out to 
play in the snow. He found a 
magic bell. He wished that 
Christmas would come next 
week. Because he wanted a Big 
racing car set. He went to Santa 
house and told him what he 
wanted. "I want a racing car set. 
Do you know what I found? Yes 
I' know what you found. You 
found a magie bell. And then 
Christmas came and Tom got his 
racing car set. 

Paul DeAngelQ 
Atherton Hough School 
Grade 4 



My new years resolutions are 
cutting down on chocolate so I 
will have more money, and be a 
better athlete so I can do better 
in gym. I will not eat so much 
candy because I do not want to 
go to the dentist. 

Susie DeCelle 

Willard School 

Grade 5 

MY NEW YEARS RESOLUTION 

My New Years Resolution is 
to be a better athlete so I can be 
better than my brother. 

Mary LaRosa 

Willard School 
Grade 5 



MY NEW YEARS RESOLUTION 

I would like to be a better 
athlete because when 1 miss a 
foolish pass my brother yells at 
me and then I have to block for 
a set of downs. I may miss a fly 
ball that could cost us the game 
then I would be benched for the 
rest of the game. What if there 
was one minute left in the 
hockey game and we were down 
by one? If I had a break-a-way 
and I tripped, everybody would 
laugh at me and yell at me. That 
is why 1 would like to be a 
better athlete. 

- Andy Carrera 

Willard School 

Grade 5 




CHRISTMAS DAY 

The lord was born in a barn - 
not a sound or a squeak was 
heard. The little lord Jesus was 
now asleep in the hay. The cow 
gave the little Jesus his bed. The 
doves above said, "Do not cry 
little lord Jesus." Mary said to 
herself, "I have savior of the 
world, Joseph. I have the son 
that will become father." The 
little lord Jesus looking up at 
Mary and Joseph seemed to say 
"1 the Holy Spirit in me God 
Bless you. 

Marie McArdle 

Atherton Hough School 

Grade 4 



SANTA AND ME 

Once upon a time at my 
house on Christmas Eve, Santa 
came and I awoke. I snuck 
downstairs to see what I was 
going to get. 

I asked him what I was 
getting he started telling me this; 
A Bobby Orr hockey game, a 
Smash up Derby set, Walkie 
Talkie. Just then my father 
started, to wake up and I ran up 
stairs tdvbed. Santa climbed up 
the chimraney , and climbed into 
his sleigh and left. The end. 

N . Robert Conley 
Atherton Hough School 
Grade 4 



\ 



THE GRINCH IN WHO LAND 

The Grinch was not like other 

people. He had a funny Itch to 

steel, especially on Christmas 

Day. He found a plan and yelled 

"whooray". I will not let 

Christmas Day stay. The Grinch 

told his dog "Hissore" his plan. 

But they did not stop Christmas 

Day because the Who's heard 

their plan and left that ugly, 

ugly land. The Who's had fun 

that Christmas Eve in our land. 

Jane Sparks 

Atherton Hough School 

Grade 4 



RESOLUTIONS 

I will make my fort stronger. 
I will not watch T.V. so 
much. 

I will not spend so much 
money. 

And keep my desk clean. 

Mark Kelly 
Willard School 
Grade 5 





RESOLUTIONS 

I will not get a hair cut. 
I will go to the store for my 
mother. 

I will not chew gum in 
school. 

Billy Wightman 
Willard School 
Grade 5 
MY NEW YEARS RESOLUTION 

My New Years Resolution is 
to keep mv desk clean because 
when my desk is messy it will 
not close. 

John Ahokas 
Willard School 
Grade 5 
ELVES AT CHRISTMAS 

It is a holly jolly time when 
Elves come to play with you. As 
the elves help santa claus put all 
the toys in his sleigh for all the 
boys and girls and you better be 
good or you will not get any toy 
all you will get is a bag of cole. 
Most of all it is fun to sneek 
down stairs or in to the living 
room to see what you get. 

Linda Wencek 
Atherton Hough School 
Grade 4 
CHRISTMAS MORNING 

On Christmas night jolly old 
santa claus comes to your house 
with a big sack filled with toys. 
Then that morning you get out 
of bed. And you walk down, 
your stairs and look all around 
the room filled with toys. Then 
you open all your gifts and have 
a jolly good day. 

Edward Campbell 
Atherton Hough School 
Grade 4 




CHRISTMAS STORY 

Once upon a time there was a 
rumor that there wasn't going to 
be Christmas on Christmas Eve 
there was no Christmas trees no 
singing no bells ringing and no 
laughter then Christmas 
morning, all the children woke 
up with toys all over the place. 
There really was a christm«.s 
someone snuck into the house in 
the middle of the night! 

Joseph McClelland 

Atherton Hough School 

Grade 4 



>*! SH * 



MY NEW YEAR RESOLUTION 

My New Year Resolution is 
to eat more food because when I 
play football I get flattened. The 
end. 

Stanley Benson 

Willard School 

Grade 5 

NEW YEARS RESOLUTION 

I am going to stop messing up 
my shoes. Because I get shoe and 
a few days later I end up 
polishing them. 

I am going to try to write 
neater. Because It's always 
messy and 1 can hardly read it. 
I am going to keep my room 
clean Because when I want to go 
out I have to clean it. 

John Warner 

Willard School 

Grade S 

MY NEW YEARS RESOLUTION 

I will not eat that much 
candy because it is not good for 
you. 

Joseph Callahan 

Willard School 

Grade 5 

MY NEW YEARS RESOLUTION 

I will be a better athlete so I 
can do well in gym and so I can 
get a good mark in gym. 

Kathy Park 

Willard School 

Grade S 

THE CHRISTMAS MOUSE 

The Christmas mouse was a 
little animal that had big ears. 
He was going to be called big 
ears but he always wanted to 
know what Christmas was, so his 
frinds called him Christmas. He 
got mad becuase he did not 
know what Christmas was all 
about. His brother came to see 
him and said, "Christmas is 
coming. Are you geting ready 
for it? Christmas mouse said, 
what is Christmas? Is it cheese? 
His brother laughed and said, No 
that is not what it is. It is the 
birthday of Jesus. Christmas 
mouse was now proud of his 
name and he knew what 
Christmas really meant. 

Michelle Lyons 

Atherton Hough School 

Grade 4 



CHRISTMAS EVE 

One Christmas night when I 

was in bed. I heard a noise. I 

look out the window and I saw 

Santa Claus. He was singing, ho 

ho ho Merry Christmas to all 

good boys and girls. When I 

woke up in the morning I saw 

the toy that I airways wanted. It 

was a big doll my favorite doll. 

Ann McCarron 

Atherton Hough School 

Grade 4 



CHRISTMAS 

On Christmas eve 'every child 
is sleeping and dreaming, 
because in the morning they will 
jump out of bed, and run to the 
tree. Under the tree is preasnts 
for everyone. After they cheek 
their preasnts and open them, 
they go to their stocking and 
cheek them. They are all happy. 
The End. 

Tricia Heirty 

Atherton Hough School 

Grade 4 



■ 




JOHN N. BLAKE 





*yfL Jul ^^B 


r^SsJ 


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1 




Thursday, January 1 1 , 1973 Quincy Sun Page 1 7 




Kemper Holds 
Thank You' Reception 



WILLIAM E.KELLEY 



GEORGE 0. REAROON 



Chamber Elects John Blake President; 
George Reardon, William Kelley V.P.'s 



John W. Blake, chairman of 
the Board of Colony, Inc., has 
been elected President of the 
South Shore Chamber of 
Commerce by the Chamber's 
Board of Directors. 

Also elected to serve as 
officers with Blake were George 
D. Reardon of Hingham, 
President of President Chevrolet, 
who will serve as First Vice 
President for Program of Work; 
and William E. Kelley of 
Cohasset, President of Hancock 
Bank - Second Vice President for 
Budget and Finance. Their term 
of office, which began Jan. 1, is 
for one year. 

Blake, who served as the 
Chairman for Program of Work 
Development Committee for the 
Chambers 1973 Program of 
Work, has been active with the 
Chamber since. 1961, and was 
instrumental in its 
reorganization during the last 18 
months. 

Blake, a graduate of Phillips 
Academy, Andover, and Harvard 
University, is co-founder of 
Colony, Inc., a welding and 
industrial gas supply company 
with offices in Quincy, Brockton 
and Walpole. 

In addition to his Chamber 
responsibilities, Blake is a trustee 
of the Fessenden School, West 
Newton; Member of the 
Corporation, Winsor School, 
Boston; member, Board of 
Directors, Braintree St. Coletta 
Day School", serving as that 
school's chairman for the Capital 
Funds Drive in 1970; Class 
agent, class of 1945, Phillips 
Academy; Vice Chairman, Board 
of Directors, Family Counseling 
and Guidance Center, Quincy; 

Advisory Board, Quincy Corps, 
Salvation Army and General 
Chairman for their Capital 
Funds Campaign in 1968; Vice 
Chairman, Budget Panel, South 
Shore Region of the United 
Community Services; Chairman, 
Mayor's Downtown Quincy 
Steering Committee, 1971; a 
member of the Quincy Rotary 
Club, and The Hundred Club of 
Massachusetts. 

He is a member of the Board 
of Directors of the Shipbuilders 
Cooperative Bank, Quincy; 
Regional Chairman of the 



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National Welding Supply 
Association, 1964-69; and Union 
Carbide National Distributor 
Advisory Council, 1966. Blake is 
the recipient of the Quincy 
Jaycee's Distinguished Service 
Award for 1971; Union 
Carbide's "Distributor of the 
Year" Award for 1969; and the 
Massachusetts Salvation Army 
Distinguished Community 
Service Award for 1968. He is a 
member of the Neighborhood 
Club of Quincy, the Union Club 
of Boston, Harvard Club of 
Boston, Clover Club of Boston, 
and the Brae Burn Country 
Club. 

Blake resides with his wife, 
the former Mary Comerford, at 
265 Country Drive, Weston, and 
Waterville Valley, N.H. The 
Blakes have one son and four 
daughters. 

Reardon, serving as First Vice 
President, also automatically 
becomes Chairman of the 
Program of Work Committee 
which is responsible for the 
establishment of a set of goals 
and objectives for the coming 
year. 

Reardon is President of the 
President Chevrolet, Inc., 
President Automotive Leasing 
and President Marine of Quincy. 

A graduate of Thayer 
Academy and Bowdoin College, 
he served in the U.S. Army 
Intelligence. He has beenjjctive 
in the community and is a 
Trustee of the Quincy Savings 
Bank; a Director of the Hancock 
Bank; Massachusetts Bay United 
Fund; Massachusetts Auto 
Dealers Association; and South 
Shore Chamber of Commerce 
serving as its Membership 
Steering Committee Chairman. 
He is also a member of the 
Quincy Neighborhood Club, 
Cohasset Golf Club, and 
Hingham Yacht Club. 

Reardon, the son of the late 
Dr. and Mrs. Daniel B. Reardon, 
is the brother of Massachusetts 
Supreme Court Justice, Paul C. 
Reardon, and Artist Mary 
Reardon. 

He and his wife, Ruth, are the 
parents of four sons and two 
daughters and reside at 110 
Summer St., Hingham, and Deer 





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Kelley, in his capacity as 
Second Vice President is the 
Treasurer of the Sputh Shore 
Chamber, and at the same time 
serves as Chairman of the Budget 
and Finance Committee-the 
committee responsible for 
determining the ways and means 
by which budget requirements 
are to be met. 

A graduate of Boston 
University, with an MBA from 
Boston College, Kelley served in 
the U.S. Marine Corps. He has 
been active with the YMCA, 
Mass Bay United Fund, Mass. 
Bankers Association, Robert 
Morris Associates, and the 
American Institute of Banking. 

He is marred to the former 
Angelina Marini. The Kelleys live 
at 43 Forest Ave. in Cohasset 
and have five daughters and one 
son. 



James S. Kemper, Jr., 
President of the principal 
companies comprising the 
Kemper Insurance Group was 
joined by Richard R. DeMark, 
Vice President and New England 
Manager and other Kemper 
executives in hosting a recent 
reception for Quincy officials 
and other local dignitaries. 

The reception was held at the 
new headquarters of the Kemper 
Group at 150 Newport Ave., 
North Quincy. Following tours 
of the new facility, the reception 
gave Kemper officials an 
opportunity to thank the 
numerous individuals and 
organizations who cooperated 
with them in their relocation 
from downtown Boston to the 



State Street South Complex. 

DeMark, in paying tribute to 
those helpful during the 
relocation, said, "Special 
gratitude goes to Quincy Mayor 
Walter J. Hannon, his staff, and 
the entire city government of 
Quincy, as well as to the 
Chamber of Commerce for the 
able assistance and cooperation 
in making our move a smooth 
and exciting event. Appreciation 
also goes to the State Street 
South Corporation for their 
assistance and advice over the 
past three years." 

The State Street Bank was 
represented at the reception by 
President George B. Rockwell 
and by John N. Dwyer, 
Executive Vice President of the 
State Street South Corporation. 



Joseph Harold Reappointed To Commission 



Joseph R. Harold of Quincy. 
Department Adjutant of the 

Disabled American Veterans has 
been reappointed by Governor 



F r a n'c is Sargent, o ' 
Massachusetts, as a member ol 
the Massachusetts Commission 
on Employment of the 
Handicapped. 



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WHw ^iw ii w i ip p»W»" *Wfc— * 



Page 18 Quincy Sun Thursday, January II, 1973 



In GBL Hockey 

Quinc 
In Ro 




North Now 
Of Spoilers 



This is 
frustrating 



getting to be a 
season for Coaches 
Ron Erikson and Bob Sylvia of 
the North Quincy and Quincy 
hockey teams. 

Both coaches had high hopes 
jt the start of the Greater 
Boston League season but now it 
seems- each team can only play 
the role of spoiler. 

Friday North will face 
Maiden at 9 p.m. and Quincy 
will meet Medford at 6:30 at 
Boston Arena. Wednesday, 
North and Quincy will clash for 
th.' second time at 6:30. The 
rivals played to a 1-1 tie in their 
first meeting. 

Erikson had visions of the 
Raiders really coming into their 
own following a 5-2 win over 
Everett and a 1-1 tie with 
unbeaten Revere but the team 
"dropped a 5-2 decision last 
Friday to Medford. 

North trailed by only a 2-1 
count after two perfbds but the 
Mustangs scored three times in 
the final period for the 
three-goal margin. 

Joe Lannon scored the game's 
first goal with Kevin Jago and 
Kevin Hurley having assists. 

Medford scored twice in the 
final two minutes of the opening 
period and made it 3-1 early in 
the final session. 

Jim Mullaney converted 
passes from Paul O'Donnell and 
Ken Graham but Medford put 
the game on ice with two more 
tallies. 

"We made some key mistakes 
and they capitalized on them," 
said Erikson. "In the last period 
we had problems clearing our 
zone and that cost us. This was 
an important game as we could 
have moved into fourth place 
with a win. We know we can 
play good hockey now but we 
must shoot for consistency." 

Monday night North again 
did a complete turnabout as it 



SOUTH SHORE 
SKINDIVCR 




511 WASHINGTON ST. 
71S44S1 



edged Somerville, 3-2, to even 
the score for a heartbreaking last 
minute loss to the Highlanders in 
their first meeting. 

Robbie Henderson scored the 
first of his two goals at 2:42 of 
the opening period, converting 
passes from Dave Noonan and ( 
Steve McKay. Somerville tied it 
up at 10:53. 

Jim Mullaney again gave the 
Raiders the lead at 6:42 of the 
middle period with Ken Graham 
and Henderson, having assists, 
but again Somerville knotted the 
count later in the period. 

Henderson scored the 
clincher at 1:18 of the final 
period with McKay and Mike 
O'Hanley setting it up and goalie 
Jim Fatseas, outstanding 
throughout the game, held the 
Highlanders off the rest of the 
way to insure North's second 
win. 

It has been a mighty 
disappointing season for Sylvia 
and it hit a new low Friday 
when the Presidents were 
bombarded by Maiden, 10-3, by 
far the worst defeat ever for a 
Sylvia-coached team. 

The Presidents trailed by only 
a 4-3 score at the end of two but 
Maiden poured in six goals in the 
final 1 2 minutes. 

"We have never had a team 
beaten like that and I don't 
know what the effect will be on 
the kids," the Quincy coach 
said. "It might have seriously 
hurt us as a team or it might 
have the reverse effect and clear 
the air of our problems. I think 
they'll bounce back. They will 
have to, as our next two games 
are with Revere and Medford." 

The Presidents played 
1 e a g ue - 1 e a ding Revere 
Wednesday night. 

"We have a lot of young 
players who are going to get 
playing time from now on," 
Sylvia went on. "We used a lot 
of them against Maiden. I think 
we will be playing looser from 
now on and we'll look upon 
ourselves as spoilers." 

Maiden took a 1-0 lead in the 
first period and made it 3-0 with 
two goals in the first two 
minutes of the middle session. 

Quincy bounced back to tie it 
up when Al Lancione scored at 
2:26 with an assist for Jim 
Starkey, Bill Bennett scored on a 
solo dash at 3:00 and Starkey 
converted John Prescott's pass at 
3:35. It was one of Quincy's 
most explosive stretches in some 



time. Maiden regained the lead, 
then the roof fell in during the 
final period. 

Earlier in the week North 
turned in one of "its better 
performances to hold defending 
champion and undefeated league 
leader Revere to a 1-1 tie. 

After two scoreless periods 
highlighted by Dave Messina's 
remarkable work in goal, the 
Raiders took the lead at 4:22 of 
the final period when Mullaney 
converted Graham's pass. 

But the high scoring Tom 

Guarino, thwarted time after 

time by Messina, cracked the^ 

tough North defense with a low 

shot from the deep slot that just 

eluded Messina's right skate at 

8' 12 

The tie', following an 

impressive 5-2 win over Everett, 

delighted Erikson. 

''Messina was just 
outstanding, it's not possible to 
have a better game than he had," 
the North coach said. "Our kids 
covered extremely well. We 
didn't give them much but what 
we did, Dave stopped cold." 
Messina had 27 saves, many of 
them spectacular. Perhaps the 
best was on Guarino, one of the 
league's best, in the last period 
and he also had a beauty on Bob 
White, off a three-one Revere 
break. 

"We are only 1-3-2 after this 
game but we could well be 
3-1-2," Erikson pointed out. 
"The only game we feel we 
should have lost was to Maiden 
[7-0], but we easily could have 
beaten Somerville and Chelsea." 

It was another rough night 
for Quincy, which bowed to 
Somerville, 4-2, on two last 
period goals by the Highlanders. 

Paul Campbell scored for the 
Presidents at 6:36 of the 
opening period with Starkey and 
Lancione, to tie the count. After 
Somerville regained the lead, 
Ted Wiedemann again knotted 
the count for Quincy at 2:58 of 
the middle session on a pass 
from Sean Polley. But 
Somerville iced it with two goals 
in the finals. 

The Presidents showed all the 
mechanics of sound hockey but 
again were unable to score when 
they had the chances. 

"I'm at a total loss for an 
explanation," a disappointed 
Sylvia said. "Everything seems 
all right. The talent ft there, we 
know, and the spirit seems to be 
there and then a game starts 
and-nothing. 



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Bay Colony 
League Standings 

'A' TEAMS 
MITE DIVISION 



Teams 


Wins 


Losses 


Ties , 


Points 


Abington Huskies 


14 








28 


Bridgewater 


10 


3 


1 


21 


Quincy 


9 


4 


1 


19 


Cohasset 


9 


4 


1 


19 


Duxbury 


9 


5 





18 


Columbia 


8 


5 


1 


17 


Hanover 


3 


10 


1 


7 


Abington Terriers 


2 


10 


2 


6 


Avon 


2 


12 





4 


Hull 





13 


1 


1 



PEEWEE DIVISION 



Teams 



Wins Losses 



Ties Points 



Quincy 


24 


2 





48 


Brockton 


20 


7 





40 


Hull 


16 


11 


1 


33 


Canton 


12 


15 


1 


25 


Columbia 


11 


13 


3 


25 


Hingham— 


10 


17 


1 


21 


South Boston 


7 


21 





14 


Scituate 


5 


19 


2 


12 



SQUIRT DIVISION 



Teams 



Wins Losses 



Ties 



Points 



Quincy 


12 


2 





24 


Brockton 


9 


5 





18 


Canton 


9 


5 





18 


Scituate 


7 


4 


3 


17 


Holbrook 


8 


6 





16 


Abington 


6 


7 


1 


13 


Hingham 


1 


10 


3 


5 


Hull 





13 


1 


1 



MIDGET DIVISION 



Teams 


Wins 


Losses 


Ties 


Point 


Mustangs 


21 


4 


2 


44 


Canton 


20 


3 


4 


44 


Quincy 


15 


9 


3 , 


33 


Hingham 


14 


12 


1 , 


29 


Brockton 


12 


12 


3 


27 


Marshfield 


9 


17 


1 


19 


Holbrook 


8 


16 


3 


19 


Bridgewater 





26 


1 


1 



BANTAM DIVISION 



Teams 



Wins Losses 



Ties 



Points 



South Boston 


21 


4 


3 


45 


Columbia 


22 


6 





44 


Canton 


20 


5 


3 


43 


Brockton 


15 


11 


2 


32 


Quincy 


13 


14 


1 


27 


Holbrook 


6 


19 


3 


15 


Hingham 


4 


22 


2 


10 


Scituate 


4 


24 





8 



Local 792 Drops Two 
In Midget Loop 



Fire Department Local 792 
took it on the chin twice last r 
week in the Quincy Youth 
Hockey Midget House League, 
losing to Cox Rambler, 3-2, and 
to Rich's South Shore Express, 
1-0. 



Sean Morgan, Ken Drain and 
Rick Lucier had the goals for 
Cox while Dan Blaney and Joe 
Carty had the goals for the Fire 
Department. Bill Connolly had 
the lone score for Rich's. 



Men's Volleyball Resumes 



The Quincy Recreation 
Department announces that the 
Mens' Volleyball Program will 
resume at 6 p.m. tonight 



[Thursday] at the Broad 
Meadows Junior High School 
Gymnasium, Calvin Rd, Adams 
Shore. 




In Quincy Youth Hockey Action 



Thursday, January 1 1 , 1973 Quincy Sun Page 19 



Blackwood Hands Farina First Defeat 



Rick Dennar and Bob 
Carmody netted two goals each 
Saturday as Blackwood 
Pharmacy handed Farina 
Kitchens its first defeat of the 
season, 6-3, creating a three way 
tie for first in the Quincy Youth 
Hockey Association Bantam 
House League. 

Peter Jabaily and Ronan 
Storer were the other scorers for 
Blackwood while Paul O'Brien, 
Bob Page and Kevin Doyle got 
goals for Farina. Blackwood, 
Farina and Bersani Brothers are 
now deadlocked for the top, 
each with six points. 

Bersani edged Johnson Motor 
Parts, 2-1, on the strength of 
goals by Paul Andrews. Tommy 
O'Reardon had the Johnson 
tally. 

Derringer's and the Quincy 
Sun went winless for the fourth 
straight week, playing to a 3-3 
tie. Kevin Murphy had two goals 
and Richie Boyle a single for the 
Sun while Bruce Brennan, Frank 
Shea and Mark Ricciardi scored 
for Derringer's. 

Bersani and Farina will seek 



Top Scorers 





Goals 


Asts 


Pts 


John Fitzgerald, 5 


6 


II 


Farina 








Bob Carmody, 


2 


7 


9 


Blackwood 








Tom Wilkinson, 5 


2 


7 


Farina 








Dave Hurley, 


6 





6 


Blackwood 








Rick Dannar, 


5 





5 


Blackwood 








Dave Peters, 


4 


1 


5 


Farina 








John Cooney, 


4 





4 


Johnson 








Paul Andrews, 


3 


1 


4 


Bersani 








Jim Connors, 


1 


3 


4 


Blackwood 








to dissolve their share of the tie 


for top spot -Saturday [Jan. 


13] 


when they meet at Hingham 


Arena at 7 


a.m. 


[Rink 


A]. 


Derringer's 


plays 


Blackwood 


7:15 a.m. 


on Rink C 


and 


Johnson's tangles with the Sun 


8:15 a.m. on Rink A 







Bantam Standings 



Won Lost Tied Pts. 



Bersani Brothers 


3 


1 





6 


Blackwood Pharmacy 


3 


1 





6 


Farina Kitchens 


3 


1 





6 


Johnson Motor Prts 


1 


2 


1 


3 


Derringer's 





2 


2 


2 


Quincy Sun 





3 


1 


1 



Midget'AV Team Bombs 
Holbrook, Edges Hingham 



The Quincy Midget "A" team 
won a pair of games Sunday, 
bombing Holbrook, 6-1, and 
squeezing by Hingham, 5-4. 

Walter Conley [21, Peter 
DiBona, Rick Avery, Al 
Lancione and Ed McDonald 
were the scorers against 



Holbrook; Conley, DiBona, 
Frank Guest, Tom Kelly and Bill 
Bennett tallied in the Hingham 
game. 

"The Midget "B" team 
walloped Hyde Park, 6-1, as 
Mike Mc/^uley had the three 
goal hat tuck, Tim Pyne had two 
goals and Jim Connolly a single. 



Mark Veasey In Hat Trick 
As Quincys Squirt 'A's' Win 



Mark Veasey collected the 
three goal hat trick and Jimmy 
Campbell starred in goal Sunday 
as the Quincy Squirt "A" team 
trounced Canton, 6-1. Scott 
Richardson, Neil Shea and John 



Furey had the other goals. 

The Squirt "B" team blanked 
Scituate, 4-0, on a pair of scores 
by Mike Panico and single goals 
by Mike Doherty and Joe 
Rathgeb. 




HANNON TIRE, skating in the Quincy Youth Hockey Association Squirt House League comprises, from 
left; front row, Bryan Radzik, Paul Furey, Jim Norton, Brian Ofria, Bob Bolster, Tad Duggan, Rich 
Isacc. Second row, Greg Freeman, Tony Kraunellis, Tom Roche, Tom Hannon, Steve Kraunellis, Tom 
McHugh, Bob Larson, Mike Cronin and Dave Picot. Coaches are Bill Roche and Frank Furey. 

[Quincy Sun Photo] 

Jaff Nord Racks Up Sixth Shutout 



Goalie Jeff Nord racked up 
his sixth shutout of the season 
last Friday as the Quincy 
Bantam "B" team trounced 
Hull, 5-0, to extend its runaway 
lead in the Alamo League to 10 



Points. 

Matt Dillon had two goals for 
the winners while Dennis 
Bertoni, Mark Kelly and Dave 
Previtt had one each. 

The Bantam "B" followed up 



that victory with a 4-3 decision 
over South Boston in a 
non-league game on goals by 
Mike Smith ( 21 , Mark Kelly and 
Dave Perdios. 



Lyons, Keegan Pace Dee Dee's To Win 



John Lyons and Kevin 
Keegan collected the goals 
Sunday, Jan. 7, as Dee Dee's 
whitewashed the North Quincy 
Professional Building, 2-0, in the 



Quincy Youth Hockey Squirt 
House League. 

Bill Dudley and Brian 
Sullivan had two goals each and 
Dave Boyle and Dennis 



Harrington one apiece in 
Nardone Aluminum's 6-4 victory 
over Hannon Tire. Brian Ofria 
[21, Greg Freeman and Brian 
Radzik scored for Hannon. 



Kevin Craig Scores Two But Mite 'A's' Bow 



The Quincy Mite "A" team 
bowed to Cohasset Sunday [Jan. 
71 8-5, despite a pair of goals by 
Kevin Craig. Mike McNiece, 



Johnny Cummings and Jimmy 
Seymour had the other scores 
for Quincy. 

The Mite "B" team was' 



overrun by Brockton, 10-1, with 
the lone Quincy goal off the 
stick of Jimmy Seymour. 



Quincy Pee Wees Trounce Brockton 



Quincy Pee Wees trounced 
their closest rivals from 
Brockton, 5-2, Sunday to run 



their Bay Colony Blue Division 
lead to eight points. 

John Kelly had two goals and 



Mark Giordoni. Brian Bertoni 
and John Yaxter had one apiece 
for Quincy. 



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Page 20 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 1 1 , 1973 



r 



In Basketball 



No Tears For Finnegan'/ North Drops Two 



By TOM SULLIVAN 

If ever a coach had a reason 
to sit down and cry it was 
Quincy's Marty Finnegan. 

The veteran basketball coach 
lost starter Mike Marvelle, a key 
player, on the final practice 
before the season opened, with a 
broken ankle. 

Then, just before last week's 
Revere game, Bill Kiggen, 6-5 
.enter, re-injuftd his knee which 
.vpt him out of action a year 
aro, and Jim McKinnon also 
suffered a knee injury as they 
joined Marvelle on crutches for 
the Revere contest. 

With this trio silelined for 
several more games [Kiggen 
could be out for the season] 
much of the Presidents' punch 
also went. 

Bur, Finnegan isn't the kind 
of coach to sit down and cry 
over his misfortunes. Instead, he 
and his players began to regroup 
and change their tactics a bit 
and, instead of playing dead, 
they walloped Chelsea, 84-57, 
last Friday after giving Revere a 
great game before losing. 

Friday night Quincy hosts 
Somerville and Tuesday plays at 
Medford. 

North Quincy, which lost two 
close decisions last week, goes to 
Revere Friday and has an open 
date Tuesday. 

Quincy assistant Joe 
Amorosino, one of the best 
basketball men around, played a 
big part in the Presidents' romp 
over Chelsea. 

Quincy was well in front, 
47-33, at the half but Chelsea's 
Tony Taraskiewicz had thrown 
in 24 points. Amorosino, 
Quincy's junior varsity coach, 
suggested that the team go into a 
d i a mond zone, with a 
man-to-man defense on 
Taraskiewicz. 

Mark MacLeod took care of 
the rest as he held the Chelsea 
star to two baskets and two foul 
shots in the third period and his 
mates added eight points to their 
lead. 

John Reggiannini topped the 
scorers with 28 points, followed 



by Ken Furfari with 18, Phil 
Iovanna with 1 1 and Ray Papile 
with 10. 

Meanwhile, North Quincy 
had a disappointing night as it 
squandered a 15-point lead and 
lost to Maiden, 63-59, its second 
loss in a row after three wins in a 
row including two in the Greater 
Boston League. 

North led, 35-20, at the half 
but the usually potent defense 
faltered in the third period and 
Maiden had a hot shooting hand 
to outscore the Raiders, 26-12 
and trail by just one. 

Maiden shot 13 for 16 in that 
period. 

The Raiders out-scored 
Maiden from the floor, 25 
baskets to 23, but for the third 
game in a row missed many 
one-and-one chances from the 
foul line which again cost them. 

While this was happening in 
the final period, Maiden was 
hitting on nine of 10 from the 
line to insure the win. 

For North John Stevens was 
top scorer with 1 7 points, while 
Ken Marsters had 1 4. They were 
the only Raiders in double 
figures. 

The Presidents earlier in the 
week, playing their first game" 
with Kiggen and McKinnon 
joining Marvelle on the bench, 
refused to quit as they easily 
could have and gave Revere a 
great game before losing, 57-53. 

"There was naturally a 
pyschological letdown losing 
two more players just before the 
game, but we'll just have to 
regroup as best we can," said 
Finnegan. 

"The boys certainly didn't 
quit and they won't quit in any 
game. They really scrapped all 
the way and if some of those 
shots fell it may have been 
different. But that's the way this 



game goes. I can't fault this 
team, everyone gave me 100 
percent and I am proud of 
them." 

Trailing only 22-21 at 
halftime, Quincy fell behind, 
39-31, in the third period. 

Finnegan hailed Iovanna, 
Furfari and Mike Cullen in 
particular for their 
performances. "Iovanna gave us 
a good game, Furfari hustled all 
night and Cullen, just up from 
the jayvees, played very well," 
the Presidents' coach lauded. 

Furfari had 14 points, 
Iovanna 12, MacLeod and 
Reggiannini 1 1 each. 

North, playing at Somerville's 
"snakepit" suffered its first loss, 
a last second 58-57 heart breaker. 

Tied, 57-all, with 39 seconds 
to play, Somerville missed a foul 
shot. Going for the rebound, 
North fouled and this time 
Somerville hit for the winning 
point. 

"They just shot better than 
we did, that's all," said Coach 
Bob Nolan, who saw a 22-game 
regular season win streak 
snapped. "We had our chance to 
win in the final minute but 
missed three one-on-ones. We 
had only three for 1 2 in the last 
period. 

"But I'm not disappointed. It 
was a great defensive game. It 
was very well played and I have 
no regrets." 

Statistically, the Raiders had 
a good night from the floor with 
24 for 55 but had only nine for 
18 from the foul line. North 
out-rebounded the home club, 
27-15, limiting it to four 
offensive rebounds. 

Pete Bellotti led the scoring 
with 16 points, followed by 
Jamie Doherty with 1 4, Marsters 
with 13 and Stevens with 10. 



Quincy, North Track 
Teams Back In Action 



The Quincy and North 
Quincy track teams will resume 
Greater Boston League 



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MOTHER NATURES 

589 WASHINGTON ST., QUINCY 472 3658 

VITAMINS-SUPPLEMENTS 

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Concept In Insurance 

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competition Saturday after a 
day off last' week in favor of the 
annual State Coaches' Meet. 

Bob Gentry's North team with 
a 2-1 record, faces Medford and 
Tom Hall's Quincy club, 1-2, 
meets Chelsea at 9:30 a.m. at 
the Medford High cage. 

North is just behind Revere 
and Somerville [3-1 each], while 
Quincy is still in the running as 
it has been shown that anyone 
can beat anyone else on a given 
day. 

Last week neither Quincy nor 
North fared well in the coaches' 
meet at Northeastern with the 
only points coming when North 
finished second in the two-lap 
relay. 



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Munson Named 
To All-Star Team 



Larry Munson, a University 
of Pennsylvania senior from 
North Quincy and co-captain 
last fall of the Quakers' varsity 
lightweight football team, was 
named to the ECAC all-star team 
and also received All-American 
mention. 

A guard and .linebacker for 
the lightweight squad, which 
plays the same Ivy League 
schedule as the varsity team and 
had a 6-3 season, Munson, who 
weighs ISO and stands only 5-6, 
was one of the club's 
outstanding performers 
throughout the season. 

His high school coach, Carl 
Leone, who took over when 
Jack Donahue retired and who is 
now Quincy's coordinator of 
athletics, called Larry "an 
outstanding lineman". 

"He weighed only about 140 
and was a real 'watch charm' 
guard," Leone said. "He was a 
starter as a senior and was also 
with me as a sophomore and 
junior. He was a great little 
player." 

The son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Charles L. Munson [he is clinical 
psychologist for the Quincy 
school system and also is 




LARRY MUNSON 

associated with Dr. Charles 
Djerf], Larry is an excellent 
student and plans to attend 
medical school. 



Local 513 Increases 
Lead In Little Loop 



Local 513, AFL-CIO 
increased its Quincy Bowling 
Little Loop lead over the Elks to 
seven points Saturday with a 4-0 
victory over Wollaston 
Bowladrome. 

Ca'pt. Dick Magnarelli's high 
three of 306 for Local 513 
moved him into second place in 
the individual scoring race, less 
than a point behind the leader, 
Frank Miceli. 

The standings: 

Local 513, AFL-CIO 34-10. 

Quincy Elks, 27-17. 

Burke Club, 26-18. 

Montclair Men's Club, 26-18. 

Davis Club, 25-19. 

Wollaston Bowladrome 
24-20. 

Bryan Post, 24-20. 

Hutchinson Oil, 23-2 1 . 

Brett Club, 23-21. 

Hennessey Plumbing, 19-25. 



Atlantic Fuel, 19-25. 
Mclntyre Club, 15-29. 
Local 1451 AFL-CIO, 13-31. 
Morrissey Club, 12-32. 
Individual Scorers: 
Frank Miceli, 100.21. 
Dick Magnarelli, 99.28. 
Frank Granara, 99.15. 
VinDurkin, 97.12. 
Steve Martinelli, 96.25. 
Pat Connolly, 96.21. 
Bruce Perry, 94.23. 
Dan Finn, 93.16. 
Mike Regan, 93.60. 
Dick Kelty, 91.27. 

High team three: Local 513 - 
1364. 

High team single: Hutchinson 
Oil - 482 [New season high] . 

High individual three: Dick 
Magnarelli - 306. 

High individual single: Vin 
Durkin- 123. 



Dennis Larkins ' Hat Trick 
Paces Blues To Win 



Dennis Larkins came up with 
the hat trick for the Blues as 
they defeated the stubborn 
Golds, 6-5, in St. Joseph's 
Hockey League action at Shea 
Rink. 

Also scoring for the Blues 



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Sports minded men age 21 
and up to umpire baseball 
games for the 1973 season. 
Call 328-7661, 472-1418 




were Mark Walker with a goal 
and an assist, Paul Veneziano 
with a goal and assist and Rick 
Delia Barbara with a goal. 

Scoring for the Golds were 
Frank McAuliffe, two goals; 
John Bagin, Butch Franceseni 
and Joe Mignosa, one goal each. 

In the second game the Reds 
topped the winless Green team, 
6-1. Rick Brunstrum had two 
goals, Mike McNally, Hal 
McLarnon, John Duffy and Paul 
Eklund one each for the 
winners. Jim Connors had the 
lone Green goal. 



f HTi- 1 NA#* 



NUKHINSOM OH CO. tl QUINCY, NIC 



471 1131 






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Koch Club Bowlin g 

Debbie Bursey, Phyllis Straouzzi 
Teams Win First Half Titles 



Thursday, January 1 1 , 1973 Quincy Sun Page 21 



Debbie Bursey's team 
[including Anne Butler, Jeanne 
McSweeney and Adelaide 
Durkin] has won the first half 
t'tle in the Koch Club Seniors 
bowling league. 

Top 10 bowlers were: 

Judy Abbruzzese 94.2, 
Joanne Flynn 93.1, Ruth 
Widman 92.0, Adrienne White 
92.3, Lori Andrews 92.2, Debbie 
Bursey 91.8, Sarale Cobban 
91.8, Marie Nestor 91.6, Marion 
Rideout 91.2, and Ann 
Alibrandi 9 1 . 1 . 

High team three was a tie 



between Ann Alibrandi's team 
and Sarale Cobban's team with 
1113; high team single was the 
Alibrandi team with 406. High 
individual three was Marion 
Rideout's 325 and single Judy 
Abbruzzese's 1 36. 

Phyllis Stracuzzi's team 
captured the first half 
championship in the Termite 
Division by 1 6 pins in therolloff 
of a tie with Mary Fasano's 
team. 

The winning team consisted 
of Phyllis Stracuzzi, Lori Ryan, 
Susan Capone and Joanne 



O'Leary. 

Top ten Termites were Peggy 
Kelliher 8S.S, Marilyn Tabak 
82.0, Mary Fasano 81.6, Jane 
Monahan 81.S, Debbie Koch 

81.4, Jane Troy 81.1, Regina 
Chetwynd 80.2, Carol Flynn 

79.5, Katy Anderson 79.5, and 
Doreen Barry 79. 1 . 

Kim DiBona's team swept 
both high team three and single 
with scores of 974 and 354 
while Kim DiBona had high 
individual three of 303 and Jane 
Troy's 1 24 was high single. 



Quincy Fathers Club 
Awards Banquet Jan. 20 



The 16th annual awards and 
football banquet sponsored by 
the Quincy Fathers Club will be 
held Jan. 20 at 6:30 p.m. at the 
Quincy Voc-Tech. cafeteria. 

A roast beef dinner will be 
served by Frank Basile. 

The club's officers planning 
the event are Tony Malvesti, 
president; Roy Shea, 
vice-president; Frank Osborne, 
treasurer and Mary Folino, 
secretary. 



The trophy committee 
includes James Page, Harold 
McCarthy, Victor Craig, Peter 
Little, Osborne and Malvesti, 
who will also serve as emcee. 

The banquet committee 
comprises Kathy Singer, Barbara 
Creedon, Mary Folino, Nina 
Picardi, Kitty and Fred 
Maggiani, Vic Craig, James Page, 
Osborne and McCarthy. 

Parents interested in 



attending the event may contact 
Osborne at 773-5436. 

Guests will include School 
Supt. Dr. Lawrence Creedon, 
Quincy High Principal Lloyd 
Creighton, Carl Leone, Director 
of Athletics, Lawrence Babin 
Director Quincy Vocation- 
al-Technical School; Hank 
Conroy, Quincy High grid coach 
and assistants Gene Macomber, 
Arthur Mosher, Dave Burke and 
John Bogan. 



Youngster Swim Classes , Ballet At YMCA 



Beginning Jan. 29, the 
Quincy YMCA will be offering 
morning swimming classes for 
children 3-6 years old. 

These are Instructor-Tot 
classes, as are the Thursday 
afternoon swimming and 
gym -swim classes for Young 
Tots. 

Courses are scheduled as 
follows: 

Morning Swimming Classes - 
Series of seven lessons: Mondays 
- Class 1, 9:30 - 10 A.M. Class 2, 



10- 10:30 A.M. 

Course D;?tep: Jan. 29, March 
19, May 7. 

Thursday Afternoon Classes - 
Series of 8 lessons: Gym A Swim 
- Group A, 1:10 -2:20 P.M. [ft 
hour Gym - Vi hour pooll. 
Group B, 1:45-2:55 P.M. 

Swimming Classes - Class 1, 
1:15-1:45 P.M., Class 2, 1:50- 
2:20 P.M., Class 3, 2:25 - 2:55 
P.M. 

Course Dates: Jan. 18, March 
15, May 10. 



Wednesday afternoon ballet 
classes for girls will be offered 
on the following schedule: 

Ballet - Wednesdays - 10 
lessons: Times: 1:30 - 2:20, 3-5 
year olds; 2:30-3:20, 6-7 year 
olds: 3:30 - 4:30, Grade School; 
4:30-5:30, Jr./Sr. High. 

Course Dates: Jan. 10, March 
28. 

P re-registration is required. 
Further information may be 
obtained by calling 479-8500. 



Power Squadron Offers Free Boating Course 



Quincy Power Squadron, 
Inc., will give a boating course in 
the cafeteria of Braintree High 
School, 1 28 Town St., Braintree, 
beginning Jan. 8, from 7 p.ni. to 
9 p.m. 

There will be 13 weeks of 



instruction under the direction 
of Lt- Peter Frazier. 

The course was developed 
primarily for instructing the 
small boat owner in the proper 
manner of boat trailering and 
the safe handling of boats afloat. 



Instruction is free. A text 
book, protractor and divider all 
of which are essential to 
satisfactorily complete work 
assignments may be purchased 
from the Supply Officer on 
opening night. . 



John Norton Director Suffolk V. Alumni Assn. 



John J. Norton of 44 Utica 
St., Adams Shore, has been 
elected a director of the Suffolk 



University General Alumni 
Association. 

Norton was chosen for a 



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two-year term on the 
33-member board. Results of the 
election were announced at a 
Homecoming Dinner at the 
university on Beacon Hill. The 
new directors were chosen in a 
general Jumni election. 

Norton received his bachelor 
of science in general studies 
from Suffolk in 1955. ^e is a 
past president and treasurer of 
the Suffolk General Alumni 
Association 

Norton and his wife, the 
former Anna Mae Baker, have 
six children. He is the son of the 
late Mr. and Mrs. Thomas 
Norton. 



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On The Screen 

By Vincent Puleo 



Franciosa Does Own Stunts 
Even When It Hurts 

"SOUNDER" sensation CICELY TYSON was named Best Actress 
of the Year by the National Board of Review. Can ,an Academy 
Award nomination be long in coming?... And of the same film, 
singer TAJ MAHAL [no that's not his real name, but rather reel] is a 
native son of New England... A new wrinkle in this year's Cannes 
Film Festival [May 10-25] : an International Film Poster 
Exposition... Don't know what film posters have to do with judging 
the quality of entry movies, but the Cannes folk always think up 
new ideas to drum up publicity... 

For the curious, the most critically reviewed porno attraction to 
date has been "DEEP THROAT". Practically all of your name 
reviewers have in one form or another gotten their claws into this 
controversial flick... For all the press ink, BRUCE DERN and 
WARREN OATES are still in the "due proper recognition" class. 
Household names they ain't... FARLEY GRANGER fans can catch 
him in a rare screen appearance in the soon-to-be released "THE 
SERPENT"... 

You go back a decade or three if you remember WILL GEER 
touring the States with HELEN HAYES in the distinguished A.P.A. 
repertory company... For 20 years ANTHONY FRANCIOSA has 
been one of a handful of stars who insisted on doing his own 
"stunts". As the villain in "ACROSS 1 10TH STREET" he almost 
did his "last" stunt... In a scene with actor PAUL BENJAMIN the 
script called for him to end up falling down several stairs. 
FRANCIOSA did. ..hit a wall. ..and was unconscious for almost five 
minutes... When he came to, he insisted on finishing the scene, then 
saw a doctor... Undaunted FRANCIOSA says, "I will continue doing 
all my own stunt work in future films"... 

QUOTE, UNQUOTE: "You lose some of the time what you go 
after, but you lose all of the time what you don't go after," 
NATHAN LEE MORGAN, author and script writer... LOU 
GOSSETT is a perfect delight as the manservant in "TRAVELS 
WITH MY AUNT"... SAUL CHAPLIN isn't called "Mr. Music" 
without some awe by Hollywood folk. He has won three Academy 
Awards as either musical director or associate producer of three 
highly' touted Tinseltown productions: "AN AMERICAN IN 
PARIS", "SEVEN BRIPIiS FOR SEVEN SISTERS" and "WEST 
SIDE STORY"... 

Child star KIRBY FURLONG, formerly of TV's "JAMES 
STEWART SHOW", has been signed to play LUCILLE BALL'S 
nephew in the upcoming Warner Bros, tuner, "MAME"... The new 
JACK LEMMON starrer "SAVE THE TIGER" world premiere's 
February at N.Y.C.'s Coronet Theatre... "HOWZER" is another of 
those sensitively packaged youth pics which, with the right 
promotion, could be a hit "sleeper". The ROYAL DANO topliner 
deals objectively and sympathetically with the treatment of runaway 
youths... 

And now recognition fof- films that, though not box office 
clouters, are still "artistic" hits. The National Society of Film Critics 
will give awards to mdtiorr pictures that have had durable impact on. 
if not on the public, ^hen themselves-the critics... Pictures which are 
being considered for recognition this year are: "MY UNCLE 
ANTOINE", "BAD COMPANY", "J. W. COOP". "THE GREAT 
NORTHFIELD MINNESOTA RAID", and "FAT CITY"... 

Isn't VIRNA LISI one of the most beautiful women on the screen 
today? I Ihink so... Combining careers, actor JOE COSCIA [now 
filming/ "DEATH OF A SNOW QUEEN" with JOANNE 
WOODWARD] is also hairstylist for the Broadway musical 
"PIPPIN" and two television series, "TO TELL THE TRUTH" and 
"SOMERSET"... And ROSS HUNTER was recently awarded the 
LOUELLA 0. PARSONS plaque for presenting the best Hollywood 
image to the world... Funny Titles Dept: On the drawing boards at 
Warner's "DINKY HOCKER SHOOTS SMACK"... 

Being readied for reissue, the D. W. GRIFFITH silents and 
DOUGLAS FAIRBANKS no talkie classic. "THE MARK OF 
ZORRO"... ROBERT WAGNER is slam-banging the English ratings 
with his "COLDITZ" teleseries. So much so. NBC and ABC arc 
contemplating running WAGNER'S adventure TV show here in the 
States... And from Angry Film Production [yup. that's the studios 
name] "SECRET DIARY OF A WOMEN'S PRISON". Filmed in 
living "anger" I'm sure... 

PAUL NEWMAN has the stuff of what makes up a good director. 
In his third directing stint. "THE EFFECT OF GAMMA RAYS OX 
MAN-1N-THE-MOON MARIGOLDS". NEWMAN puts it all together 
as a director, allowing the story and players to mesh harmoni/ingly 
with simplicity and minimum of restraint... DAVID L. WOLPER'S 
"THE OFFICIAL FILM OLYMPIAD" is scheduled for world release 
this May in 12 international locales... 

STEVE McQUEEN'S teleseries of many moons ago "WANTED 
DEAD OR ALIVE" is being distributed for syndication. Look for ii 
to pop up on either channel 38 or 56... Thinking out loud and 
wondering if WOODY ALLEN will be taking a film crack at Dr. 
DAVID REUBEN'S "ANY WOMAN CAN"?... And from Denmark. 
"THE SENSUOUS TEENAGER"... CHARLES BRONSONS next 
film is one "BLACK CIRCLE'*... And look for AL PACING to score 
big in "SERPIGO"... And what of LANA TURNER.' Is ilw *\ 
goddess of the 40's in retirement? Just wondering... 



-cj 



Page 22 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 1 1 , 1973 



LEGAL NOTICES 



LEGAL NOTICES 



LEGAL NOTICES 



LEGAL NOTICES 



LEGAL NOTICES 



CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 



ORDER NO. 539 
ORDERED: 



December 15, 1972 



Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy as follows: 

That the Revised Ordinances of the City of Quincy, I960, as amended, be 
further amended as follows: 

That Chapter 4. Section 1601.1 of the Revised Ordinances insofar as they 
nertain to the present Building Code also the BOCA code that takes effect 
'tnutfry 1, 1973, in the City of Quincy. Add the following Article: 

"All apartments shall have two means of egress remote from each other so 
. "Hinged that to reach one egress it will not be necessary to pass through the 
s .mic publk corridor or hallway. Any corridor or hallway divided by fire doors 
>r smoke screens of Class B doors shall be deemed to be separate corridors or 
' !i .v:iys, in computing exit requirements. 

"In lieu of a second egress, as provided in section 1601.1, a horizontal 
;. on; of fire resistive materials projecting a minimum of 8' in length beyond 
, window or door opening of a building with exterior wall of solid masonry 
■i:.\- !•(• constructed." 

Passed to be Ordained 

December 29, 1972 

Attest: John M. Gillis 

Clerk of Council 

Approved Jan. 4, 1973 

Walter J. Hannon 

Mayor 

> !r.iii Copy Attest: Thomas R. Burke, Assistant City Clerk 

' 11 73 



CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 



ORDER NO. 1 
ORDERED: 



January 2, 1973 



That the City Treasurer with the approval of the Mayor is authorized pursuant 
to G.L.c.44, S.4 as amended to borrow from time to time during the fiscal 
period beginning January 1 , 1973, an amount not exceeding the limit set forth 
in said section and acts in amendment thereof and in addition thereto, to issue 
notes of the City therefore payable in not more than one year from their 
dates, and to refund those issued for a shorter period by the issue of new notes 
payable in not more than one year from the date of the original loan being 
refunded. The notes shall not be valid unless certified thereon as to 
genuineness by the Harbor National Bank of Boston, in Boston, Massachusetts. 

Passed to be Ordained 

January 2, 1973 

Attest: John M. Gillis 

Clerk of Council 

Approved Jan. 5, 1973 

Walter J. Hannon 

Mayor 

A True Copy Attest: Thomas R. Burke, Assistant City Clerk 

1/11/73 



CITY OF QUINCY 
MASSACHUSETTS 

PURCHASING DEPT. 

1120 HANCOCK ST. 

QUINCY, MASS. 02 169 

LEGAL AD 

Invites sealed proposals for 
furnishing and delivering to the City 
of Quincy, Hospital Dept. - Ice 
Cream. 

Detailed specifications are on file 
at the office of the Purchasing Agent. 

Bids must state priorities, if any, 
the delivery date and any allowable 
discounts. Firm price bids will be 
given first consideration and will be 
received at the office of the 
Purchasing Agent, 1120 Hancock St., 
Quincy, Mass., until Jan. 29, 1973 at 
10:00 A.M. at which time and place 
they will be publicly opened and 
read. Proposals must be in a sealed 
envelope and on the outside marked: 
DATE: Jan. 29, 1973 TIME: 10:00 
A.M. Bid enclosed. 

The right is reserved to reject any 
or all bids or to accept any part of a 
bid or the one deemed best for the 
City. 

Richard K. Newcomb 
Purchasing Agent 
1/11-18/73 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of JEFFREY T. BOOKER and 
ROBERT M. BOOKER, both of 
Quincy in said County, minors. And 
to the Attorney General of the 
United States, Office of Alien 
Property, if necessary. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for authority to mortgage 
certain real estate of said minors. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the seventh day of February, 1973, 
the return day of this citation. 

Witness, J. JOHN FOX, Esquire, 
First Judge of said Court, this second 
day of January, 1973. 

Bennett V. McLaughlin, 
Register. 
1/11-18-25/73 _ 



Start this 

One off 
Righf! 

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PER YEAR 





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THE QUINCY SUN 

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QUINCY, MASS. 02169 



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COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of MARION L. PETERSON 
late of Quincy in said County, 
deceased. And to the Attorney 
General of the United States, Office 
of Alien Property, if necessary. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by HAROLD T. 
PETERSON of Quincy in the County 
of Norfolk praying that he be 
appointed executor thereof without 
giving a surety on his bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the thirty-first day of January, 1973, 
the return day of this citation. 

Witness, J. JOHN FOX, Esquire, 
First Judge of said Court, this 
twenty-eighth day of December 
1972. 

Bennett V. McLaughlin, 
Register., 
1/11-18-25/73 

CITY OF QUINCY 
MASSACHUSETTS 

PURCHASING DEPT. 

1120 HANCOCK ST. 

QUINCY, MASS. 02169 

LEGAL AD 

Invites sealed proposals for 
furnishing and delivering to the City 
of Quincy, Hospital Dept. - Butter, 
Eggs & Oleo, Milk and Cream. 

Detailed specifications are on file 
at the office of the Purchasing Agent. 

Bids must state priorities, if any, 
the delivery date and any allowable 
discounts. Firm price bids will be 
given first consideration and will be 
received at the office of the 
Purchasing Agent, 1 120 Hancock St., 
Quincy, Mass., until Jan. 29, 1973 at 
10:30 A.M. at which time and place 
they will be publicly opened and 
read. Proposals must be in a sealed 
envelope and on the outside marked: 
DATE: Jan. 29, 1973 TIME: 10:30 
A.M. Bid enclosed. 

The right is reserved to reject any 
or all bids or to accept any part of a 
bid or the one deemed best for the 
City. 

Richard Newcomb 
Purchasing Agent 
1/11-18/73 




THIS tPACC CONTRIBUTED »Y TMI PUSLKHBR 



WOODWARD'S 

EXPERT 

FRONT END 

WORK 

AND 

ALIGNMENT 

1 1 1 Htm HtCntfe l«kwtr 



TEUrlM: 773-1210 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

To the Attorney General of the 
United States, Office of Alien 
Property, if necessary, and to all 
persons interested in the trust estate 
under the will of HARRIET E. 
DOUGLAS late of Quincy in said 
County, deceased, for the benefit of 
RALPH DOLLIVER, FRANCES 
WARRINER and others. 

The trustee of said estate has 
presented to said Court for allowance 
its thirteenth to fifteenth accounts, 
inclusive. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the thirty-first day of January, 1973, 
the return day of this citation. 

Witness, J. JOHN FOX, Esquire, 
First Judge of said Court, this 
twentieth day of December 1972. 

Bennett V. McLaughlin, 
Register. 
1/4-11-18/73 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. . Probate Court 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of GEORGE J. CLEVELAND 
late of Quincy in said County, 
deceased. And to the Attorney 
General of the United States, Office 
of Alien Property, if necessary. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by JAMES M. 
ELLIS of Quincy in the County of 
Norfolk praying that he be appointed 
executor thereof without giving a 
surety on his bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Brookline 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the twenty-eighth day of March 
1973, the return day of this citation. 

Witness, J. JOHN FOX, Esquire, 
First Judge of said Court, this 
twenty-eighth day of December 
1972. 

Bennett V. McLaughlin, 
Register. 
1/11-18-25/73 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of WILLIAM P. 
FITZGERALD also known as 
WILLIAM PATRICK FITZGERALD 
late of Quincy in said County, 
deceased. And to the Attorney 
General of the United Slates, Office 
of Alien Property, if necessary. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by FLORENCE 
M. FITZGERALD of Quincy in the 
County of Norfolk praying that she 
be appointed executrix thereof 
without giving a surety on her bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the thirty-first day of January, 1973, 
the return day of this citation. 

Witness, J. JOHN FOX, Esquire, 
First Judge of said Court, this 
twenty-seventh day of December 
1972. 

Bennett V. McLaughlin, 
Register. 
1/11-18-25/73 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of EARL S. DUTTON late of 
Quincy in said County, deceased. 
And to the Attorney General of the 
United States, Office of Alien 
Property, if necessary. 

The executor of the will of said 
deceased has presented to said Court 
for allowance his first and final 
account. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the seventh day of February, 1973, 
the return day of this citation. 

Witness, J. JOHN FOX, Esquire, 
First Judge of said Court, this 
twenty-second day of December, 
1972. 

Bennett V. McLaughlin, 
Register. 
l/U-18-25/73 



471 
3100 



GOCMSS/fh 



Thursday , January 1 1 , 1 973 Quincy Sun Page 23 



fOR THE ACT/ON 
YOU WANT 



LEGAL NOTICES 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, si. Probate Court 

To the Treasurer and Receiver 
General of said Commonwealth, and 
to all persons interested in the estate 
of JOHN J. COSTELLO late of 
Quincy in said County, deceased. 
And to the Attorney General of the 
United States, Office of Alien 
Property, if necessary. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court, praying that GEORGE F. 
HIMMEL of Braintree in said County 
of Norfolk, public administrator, be 
appointed administrator of said 
estate. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the seventeenth day of January 1973, 
the return day of this citation. 

Witness, J. JOHN FOX, Esquire, 
First Judge of said Court, this twelfth 
day of December 1972. 

Bennett V. McLaughlin, 
Register. 
12/28/72 1/4-11/71 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

To RUSSELL S. GROND1N of 
Braintree in the County of Norfolk, 
and to all persons interested in a 
petition for adoption of STEPHEN 
RUSSELL GROND1N of Quincy in 
said County. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court by FREDERICK A. 
MILLER and DIANE MARIE 
MILLER his wife, of Quincy in said 
County, praying for leave to adopt 
said STEPHEN RUSSELL 
GRONDIN formerly a child of said 
Russell S. Grondin and Diane Marie 
Grondin his wife, now Diane Marie 
Miller and that the name of said child 
be changed to Stephen Russell Miller. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the seventh day of February, 1973, 
the return day of this citation. 

Witness, J. JOHN FOX, Esquire, 
First Judge of said Court, this 
twentieth day of December 1972. 

Bennett V. McLaughlin, 
Register. 
1/4-11-18/73 

COMMONWEALTH 01 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of GRACE E. JACOBS late of 
Quincy in said County, deceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court praying that WALTER J. 
JACOBS and GRACF L. BLAIK1E, 
both of Quincy, in the County of 
Norfolk be appointed 
co-administrators of said estate 
without giving a surety on their 
bonds. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the thirty-first day of January 1973, 
the return day of this citation. 

Witness J. JOHN I OX, Esquire, 
I irst Judge of said Court, this 
twenty-eighth day of December 
1972. 

Bennett V McLaughlin, 
... Register. 

1/4-11-18/73 



ANNUAL ME ETING 

The Annual Meeting of the Members 
of Colonial Federal Savings and Loan 
Association will be held on 
Wednesday, January 17, 1973 at 
4:30 P.M. at the office of the 
Association, 15 Beach Street, in that 
part of Quincy, Massachusetts called 
Wollaston, for the election of 
| directors, for receiving the reports of 
the officers and for the transaction of 
any business that legally may come 
before the meeting. 

Colonial Federal Savings and Loan 
Association of Quincy 



1/4-11/73 



Roy L. Sidelmger 
Secretary 



••» 



mm 



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ChsdM 



MAIL TO: QUINCY SUN 160J Hancock St., Quincy 02169 
WANT ADS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE...** must accompany order. 
Enclosed i« for the following ad to run___times. 



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B. ...... 

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COPY: 



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$2.25 for one week, up to 20 words, S4 each additional word. 
$2.00 per week, up to 20 words for three or more insertions of 
the same ad. 

No refund will be made at this contract rate in the event of 
cancellation. 

Deadline: Friday 5 P.M. for the following weeks publication. 

Please include your phone number in ad. 



"«■ 



INSTRUCTION 



SERVICES 



Mind Dynamics, Inc. Alpha 
Brainwave Training. 
Relaxation, E .S.P., 
Awareness. For class 
information call Mr. R. 
Waldron, 235-7877. 2/1 



OIL DELIVERY 

Nashe Oil Co. 

Fuel Oil 

$17.50 -100 Gal. Cash 

472-5968 



2/8 



HELP WANTED 



Bookkeeper-accountant 

Knowledge of bookkeeping and/or accounting for Quincy 
Junior College. College accounting experience desirable but not 
essential. Salary to be arranged. 

Apply to Mr. Edward Smith, Assistant Director of Personnel, 
Quincy Public Schools, 70 Coddington St., Quincy. 

471-0100 Ext. 252 



l 

: 

s 



Newsboys 

(And, Newsgirh, Too) 




SERVICES 



SERVICES 



FLOORS & WALLS 

Linoleum, ceramic tile, formica, told & installed. Hardwood 
Soon laid, sanded and finished. Many specials in our store. 
Wall Tie, carpeting, Armstrong floor coverings of all types 
at reduce d prices. 

ART FLOOR COMPANY 

1123 Blue Hills Avenue, Dorchester 

TA 5-6179 

Open 8:00 -5:00 Daily 
Closed SaL 



ALTERATIONS 



HALLS FOR HIRE 



Alterations done in my home. 
Reasonable rates. Wollaston 
area. Call 479-2539. 2/1 



BOATS 



AIR CONDITIONED HALL 
FOR HIRE. No. Quincy K. of 
C. Building, 5 Hollis Ave. For 
information please call 
328-5158^28 008 W28-9822. 



Clearance prices on all 


boats. Storage & 


recondition <^k 


of motors 


for winter. 


President 


Marine, 666 


Southern 


Artery, Quincy 


. 773-5058. 




TF 



INSURANCE 



CARPENTRY 



If you have a basic 
homeowners policy for 
$20,000 and are paying 
more than $75.00 a year 
call 282-4412 at once 
Rutstein Insurance 
Agei.cy. 



Licensed builder, 26 yean 
experience. Repairs, 
remodeling ft additions. No 
job too small. Free estimates. 
Charles J. Ross, 479-3755. 



KEYS MA! 



fuei - °' L 



DOYLE A LONG 

Fuel Oil 
It 
Heating Equipment 

630 Hancock St., Wollaston 
Tel: 472-4800 



Locksmith on Duty 
GRANITE CITY 
HARDWARE 
1617 Hancock St., Ouincy 
479-5454 



TAILORING 



MATTRESSE 



MATTRESSES -Immed 
Delivery - Can you use 
exceptionally good buys 
on king, queen, full or 
twin mattresses, beds, 
trundles, bunks at 
discount. Brand names, 
Sealy, Eclipse, 
Slumberland, Engiander. 
etc.; Bedding still our only 
business for over 18 years., 
open eves., Siesta Sleep 
Shops, 221 Parkingway, 
Quincy (next to 
Raymonds) . 

"F. 



AL'S TAILORING 328 6915 

Alterations • Fittings • 
Repairs for. Ladies ft 
Gentlemen. Call between 
9:30 a.m. ft 4:30 p.m. 
Evenings 6:00 p.m. to 7.00 
pin. Also Zipper Service. 



TRAILERS 



DAMON PONTIAC 5. 


TRAILER SALES & [ 


SERVICE. Cfcateau. 


Lifetime, Road-crif!$»r, 


Hobo, Camel Travel 


Trailers & Motor Homes. 


Sales ft Svce. Route 


It-Bedford St., Abmqton 


•78-0682. 






Page 24 Quincy Sun Thursday. January 1 1 , 1973 








MISS TEENAGE AMERICA and escort smile with Quincy's John Campbell and 
Joseph McManus at dance for participating high school band members. 



COTTON BOWL Basketball [that's right] Princess poses with Quincy's Joseph 
McManus [hat] and Jeff Dill while her escort doesn't seem to mind. 




BAND IS PUT through its paces outside Ramada Inn by Director Michael Cahill during 
rehearsal. Front row band members are David Rosen, Joseph McManus and John 
Merenda. 



A KISS and a plaque from former Miss America Marilyn Van Derbur are received by 
Michael Cahill, Quincy High School band director, at special ceremonies honoring the 
participating bands. That's TV's William [Cannon] Conrad smiling in background. 




THAT'S MICHAEL CAHILL under 10 gallon bat, instructing color guard during 
n*r*fj»* rehearsal. With him 're Ann Marie Ritchie, Ann Cullen, Helen Johnson, Paula 
Bielefeldt Joyce Bertoni anc Imelda Greenan. 



DIRECTOR OF MUSIC Anthony Ferranti stops to chat with Valarie Voegtlin, 
Maureen Priscella, Joy Jermyn, Lorri DeCoste and Cindy Maze at Texas hotel. 



You Can Earn More In 1973 While Getting SS Benefits 



Starting in 1973, people who 
Kiajz wiiile go. ing social 
. -urity lenefits can cam more 
bat never lost more than il in 
benefits for cich Sj earned, 
according to Frank l ulk n. 
social security district man.ic. 
in Quinjy. 

"The more you earn, Ihe 

rvjner yovr *^r«) income will 

be.' Culkin sau "Under the new 

social security law, social 

rit; payments will be 



reduced by SI for every $2 
earned over $2,100 in a year." 
Previously, monthly 
payments were redueed by SI in 
benefits for every $2 earned 
between SI, 680 and $2,880 in a 
year-and by SI for every SI 
earned over S2,880. 

"People 72 and ovei will 
continue to get their full social 
security benefits regardless of 
earnings," Culkin said. Under 
the new law, people under 72 



can earn as much as $2,100 in a 
year and get their full social 
security benefits. Different rules 
apply to people getting social 
security disability benefits if 
they work." 

In addition, starting in 1973, 
full benefits can be paid for any 
month in which an employee's 
wages are not more than* 
$175--or he didn't perform 
substantial services in 
self-employment. Previously, the 



monthly limit was SI 40. 

"Also, starting in 1973, only 
your earnings in the months 
before you reach 72 will be used 
to figure what benefits are due 
you for those months," Culkin 
continued. "Before, earnings in 
the entire year you reached 72 
were counted in figuring benefits 
due you for months before you 
were 72." 

Another feature of the new 
law assures that the earnings 



exemption for people gettiag 
social security payments will go 
up automatically in future years 
as earnings levels increase, culkin 
said. The first year there can be 
an automatic increase is 197S. 



Social security pays monthly 
benefits to eligible retired and 
disabled workers and their 
families--and to families of 
deceased workers who wete 
insured under social security. 



tfcuttff Itim Pnb!ic Librur 

Quincy, Matt. 



3k. W*i~ P otu Of Dk. Soutk Sk, 




Vol. 5 No. 18 

Thursday, January 18, 1973 



2<a*cf'd Om* WeUtf TUmtfitfm 



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General Dynamic* Pre$ident Say s: 



■ 






'Shipyard To Stay Open; The Future Is Optimistic' 




WHEN THE Quincy-buflt USS Lexington [CVT-10] arrived at the South Boston Annex of the Boston 
Naval Shipyard for repairs, Quincy Mayor Walter J. Hannon presented a Paul Revere bowl to Captain 
Charles C. Carter, USN, commanding officer. Edmund W. Del Prete [center] of Rockland worked on the 
ship over 30 years ago and participated in the welcoming ceremony. The Lexington will observe her 30th 
birthday Feb. 17, at the same pier she went into commission in 1943. The ship will be in Boston for an 
11 -week stay. 

Pruning Continue* 

Hannon Cuts $1 Million From Budget 



Mayor Walter J. Hannon's 
budget pruners have gone over 
the $1 million dollar mark in 
their efforts to chop the frills 
out of the city's 1973 budget. 

And there's another two 
weeks' work with the scissors to 
come. 

Just before the pruners 
gathered to work over the Park 
and Forestry Departments' 
budget bids Tuesday night, 
Budget Coordinator William S. 
Grindlay placed the total cuts at 
$1, 158,826. 



A half million dollars of that 
figure was cut from the City 
Hospital budget and the mayor 
said his advisors will take two 
more Tuns at the hospital on Jan. 
22 and Feb. 1. 



The schedule for the next 
two weeks includes: 

Jah. 22 - Public Works and 
City Hospital. 

Jan. 23 - Public Works and 
Civil Defense. 

Jan. 24 - Mayor's office, 



Purchasing, Auditors, Central 
Accounting and Payroll. 

Jan. 25 - Police. 
Jan. 26 - Fire 

Jan. 29 - Zoning Board and 
Recreation. 

Jan. 31 - Library Board. 
Feb. 1 - City Hospital. 

The Mayor is required by law 
to submit the budget to the City 
Counril by Feb. 15 and, says 
Coordinator Grindlay, "we'll be 
on time." 



City Council Delays Stand On 
S. Quincy MBTA Station 






The Quincy City Council has 
placed on the back burner a bid 
by Councillor Joseph J. LaRaia 
for a formal vote of opposition 
to the proposed South Quincy 
MBTA Station. 

LaRaia noted that most 
members of the Council have 
expressed opposition to one or 
more aspects of the proposal, 
which is currently moving 
toward the public hearing stage. 

Nevertheless, the Council 
voted 7-2, with LaRaia and 
Councillor Albert R. Barilaro in 



opposition, to send the 
resolution on to its Committee 
on Transportation. 

The resolve also proposes that 
the station "be established in the 
area abutting Route 3 and Union 
Street in Braintree, thereby 
serving commuters from 'all areas 
of Southeastern Massachusetts." 

LaRaia listed four reasons for 
his opposition to the station: 

• Quincy already has done its 
share by providing three stations 
on the mass transit line to the 
South Shore. 



• Making dead end roads of 
Penn and Center Streets will 
contribute to the traffic 
problems in the area. 

• Developments of the 
wetlands near the Raytheon 
building might be in violation of 
the state wetlands act and would 
certainly contribute to existing 
flood problems. 

• The city would lose 
valuable tax land area as well as 
facing an increase in its MBTA 
assessment. 



Montclair Youngsters Raise $219 For Managua 



A drive in the Montclair 
School, sponsored by the sixth 
grade, has raised $219 for 
victims of the Nicaraguan 



earthquake; it has been 
announced by Lee Gould, the' 
school principal. 

"It was a real community 



effort,"* said Gould, adding that 
he plans to send notes of thanks 
to the parents of youngsters who 
participated in the program. 



By TOM HENSHAW 

The Fore River shipyard is here to stay. 
But it's going to be rough for a while. 
And unless the Fore River Bridge is widened its future 
is limited. 

Succinctly, that's the word 
on the yard from Hilliard W. 
Paige of St. Louis, the president 
of General Dynamics Corp. 

Paige spoke last week at a 
news conference that introduced 
P. Takis Veliotis as president and 
general manager of the Quincy 
Shipbuilding Division of General 
Dynamics. 

"We are now optimistic about 
the future of this yard," said 
Paige. "AH thoughts we ever had 
about not being able to keep the 
Quincy shipyard open are-_ 
behind us. 

"We are determined not only 
to keep this yard open but we 
also intend to make Quincy the 
leading shipyard in this country 
for {,h! dwigjpt ;»J»d construction 
of liquified natural gas [LNG] 
ships.?'- 

The Fore River yard last 
September landed contracts to 
build three 125,000 cubic meter 
LNG tankers for Burmah Oil 
Tankers of New York. They 
were the first such contracts 
awarded in the United States. 

Paige said negotiations are 
now underway to build more 
large LNG tankers for El Paso 
Natural Gas of Texas and 
Globetik of London, England 
and several other firms both 
foreign and domestic. 

The Burmah contracts, Paige 
said, "came about a year later 
than we had first hoped [and] 
we have been disappointed in 
not being able to capture the 
short-term work ... to tide us 
through the months immediately 
ahead." 

General Dynamics, Paige said, 
devoted intensive efforts and 
about $1.5 million to get 
contracts for six large crude oil 
carriers to protect the yard's 



skilled work force until the LNG 
tankers could be started. 

"But delays in working out 
the very complex details 
involved finally stretched 
negotiations to the point where 
the resultant delay in the start of 
these ships would have impacted 
our primary goal, the deliveries 
of LNG ships." 

For the past six months, 
Paige said, the company has 
been trying to land Navy 
contracts for two submarine 
tenders but, due to funding 
difficulties, the Navy has been 
unable to award the contracts. 

Efforts to acquire short-term 
work continue, Paige said, but ir" 
those efforts are not successful 
"we will be forced to reduce our 
work' force between now and 
next April to about 2,000 
employees." C ur rent 
employment is about 5,000. 

"By next June," Paige 
continued, "as we complete our 
engineering and begin our 
construction of the LNGs, we 
will begin a gradual buildup of 
employees reaching about 4,000 
employees during 1975. 

"We will do everything we 
can to transfer displaced 
employees into other jobs within 
the corporation - particularly at 
our Electric Boat Division (in 
Groton, Conn.], 90 miles down 
the road, which is hiring at 
present." 

Paige said that General 
Dynamics was limited in its 
efforts to land contracts for 
crude oil carriers by the fact that 
225,000-ton tankers are the 
largest size that will fit through 
the Fore River Bridge. That's 
small in the current market. 

(Cont'd on Page 3 ] 



Windbreaker Almost Ready 
At N. Quincy MBTA Station 



A windbreaker and an 
enclosure for the comfort of 
waiting passengers should be 
completed at the North Quincy 
MBTA station by Jan. 24 
according to MBTA General 
Manager Joseph C. Kelly. 

The windbreaker is being 
installed on the upper level next 
to the bus lane while the 



enclosure is being erected on the 
parking lot level. Work began 
Jan. 10. 

Kelly made the disclosure in a 
letter to Rep. Joseph E. Brett 
(D-Quincyl who had earlier 
expressed concern for the 
protection of MBTA patrons 
waiting for trains at the station. 



2-For-l Blood Drive 
At Quincy Hospital 



Quincy City Hospital has 
started a two-for-one plan in 
an effort to build up its blood 
bank, says director Harlan L. 
Paine. 

An individual donating a 



pint of blood not intended 
for a specific patient 
establishes a credit of two 
units of blood for a member 
of his family to be used 
within a year of the donation. 



Page 2 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 18, 1973 




RENEGADE SENIORS are one of only two drum and bugle ©orps in the United States to be sponsored 
by an auxiliary police department. The other is the recently formed and growing Renegade Juniors. Both 
are sponsored by the Quincy Auxiliary Police Department. 

Successful Renegades Now Forming 
Junior Drum & Bugle Corps 



Quincy 's marching Renegades 
come in pairs now. 

The Renegades Junior Drum 
and Bugle Corps, organized only 
about a month ago, has grown to 
a membership of more than SO 
and the sponsoring Quincy 
Auxiliary Police Department is 
looking for more members. 

The youngsters, boys and 
girls 1 years and older, practice 
Mondays and Wednesday at 6:30 
p.m. in the Quincy High School 
Cafeteria. Bugles, drums and 
colors are supplied by the 
auxiliary police. 

The Renegades Senior Drum 
and Bugle Corps practices at the 



Quincy Vocational Technical 
High School cafeteria Sundays at 
10 a.m. and Thursdays at 8 p.m. 

Current Senior members 
include James Roscoe, J. D. 
Valentine, Bill Hill, Ron 
Gazzaniga, Dennis L. Hallowell, 
Bob Kuchlewski, Larry Doane, 
Tom Cinelli, Bob Sweeney, 
Danny Morelh, Rick Budney, 
Bill Ellard, Costa Curbs, John 
Collins. 

Eddie Michalski, Bob Crosby, 
John B. Gaff, Pat Gaudet, Pete 
Grove, John Matheson Jr., Dick 
Seale, Paul Gaffney, David 
Darcy, Kevin Gilchrist, Fuzzy 



Vorel, John Gebauer, William 
Mignosa, Ernest If. Parva, John 
Curran, Roland Trahan, Kenneth 
Ward, Frank Ryan, Bob Papa. 

Color guard: Katie Gilchrist, 
Nancy Albani, Mary Savosik, 
June Egersheim, Sandy Budney, 
Joanne Walters, Theresa 
Mclsaac, Elaine Gaff, Marcia 
Marzilli, Molly Murphy, Cynthia 
Eccleston, Ann Marie Ritchie, 
Cindy Wenners, Carol Ann Ward. 

Instructors are Don Murphy, 
Tom McAndrew, Jim Buckley 
and Dan Pitts. E. J. Gaff is 
manager, Tom Cinelli, assistant 
manager, and Bill James, 
quartermaster. 



Erwin Canham Keynote Speaker 
At N. E. Press Association Dinner 



Erwin D . 
editor-in-chief of 
Science Monitor, 
the Annual 
the New 



Canham, 

the Christian 

will keynote 

Awards Dinner of 

England Press 



Association's Annual Winter 
Convention Jan. 19 in the 
Sheraton-Boston Hotel. 

Canham's address will 



highlight the dinner at which 
awards will be presented for 
outstanding achievement by 

New England newspapers in 
news and feature stories, 
columns, editorials, advertising, 
photography, general excellence 
and other categories. 



F BARKER'S 
Help Cut Prices] 
To The Bone 




More than 500 newspaper 
publishers, editors, reporters and 
advertising people from the 
association's 250 member 
newspapers are expected to 
attend the four-day convention, 
which will run from Jan. 18 to 
21. More than 30 speakers from 
coast to coast will participate in 
the IS panels, dinners, 
luncheons and roundtable 
discussions that have been 
scheduled. 

Canham, a native of Maine, is 
known world-wide as one of 
America's foremost editors. He 
is also regarded as a leader 
among the nation's writers, 
radio/TV commentators and 
public speakers. 



Christmas Festival 
Awards Night 

To Be Held Jan. 22 



The Quincy Christmas 
Festival Awards Night will be 
held Jan. 22 it 7 p.m. at 
Sherry's, Quincy. 

Trophies and other awards 
for best floats and musical units 

the Dec. 3 Quincy Christmas 



in 

Parade will be presented. 

The event is sponsored by the 
Quincy Center Business and 
Professional Association. 

Among the guests will be 
Christine Simpson, 9, of 17 
Townsend Ave., Braintree and 
David Kaplan, 1 1, of 78 Charles 
St., Quincy, whose names were 
drawn from more than 35,000 
coupons deposited by shoppers 
in Quincy Center stores during 
the rhristmas season, to reign as 
Prince and Princess of the 1973 
Christmas Festival program. 

The youngsters also win a trip 
to Disneyworld, in Florida for 
themselves and a parent as guests 
of the Quincy Center Business 



and Professional Association. 

They will make the trip any 
weekend after April 15 spending 
three days and two nights in 
Florida. 

At this years' Christmas 
Festival, they will reign over the 
various activities, turn on the 
Christmas lighting, appear on 
television and ride in the 
Christmas Parade. 

Win Bettinson of WJDA will 
be the emcee at the Awards 
Night. Entertainment will be by 
the Tim Donovan Trio. A buffet 
will be served. 

Brief remarks will be made by 
Robert J. Colman, president 
Quincy Center Business and 
Professional Association; John 
E. Murray, executive director; 
Mayor Walter J. Hannon, George 
C. Fay, Festival Committee 
chairman; Anthony Famigletti, 
parade coordinator and Richard 
Venna, parade float chairman. 

Three Elected Directors 
CP South Shore Area 

a Supervisor at Quincy City 
Hospital and is a consultant and 
direct service Physical Therapist 
for the several Nursing Homes in 
the South Shore. Mr. Roncarati 
and his wife, who is also a 
Registered Physical Therapist, 
operate a clinic at their home in 
Quincy. 

Patrick R. M. Harding of 63 
Tower Ave., South Weymouth 
who attended North Quincy 
High School and Northeastern 
University in Boston and is a 
mechanical engineer and tool 
designer. Harding has worked for 
various companies and is now 
employed by Valeron Corp. of 
Detroit, Michigan as a sales and 
service engineer. 

Charles A. Krahmer of 18 
Fort Hill Lane, Duxbury who 
has worked for Honeywell Inc. 
in Wellesley for many years. 
Krahmer has a cerebral palsied 
child and has a vested interest in 
the Organization as a consumer. 



Three new members were 
elected to the Board of Directors 
of Cerebral Palsy of the South 
Shore Area, Inc. for a one year 
term announces Albert J. 
Marchionne, President of the 
Board. 

Alfred L. Roncarati of 39 
Russell Park, Quincy, has a B.S. 
in Physical Education from 
Springfield College; Certificate 
in Physical Therapy, University 
of Pennsylvania; and Master's 
Degree in Education in 
Rehabilitation Administration 
from Northeastern University. 

He has worked at the Lemuel 
Shattuck Hospital, the Boston 
Veterans Administration 
Hospital and at Northeastern 
University where he held the 
position of Chief Physical 
Therapist and Head Athletic 
Trainer. He was also Assistant 
Professor and Head Athletic 
Trainer while at Boston State 
College. Roncarati has worked as 



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1971 Capri 2-Ooor. Air Conditioned, 
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1969 Chevrolet Bel Air 4-Door. 6 

cylinder, standard shift, R&H. $1,295 
1967 Ford Squire Station Wagon. 

V-8, automatic, power steering, 

R&H. fuss 

1967 OWs F8S, 4-Ooor Hardtop. $ 996 

1967 Comet 4-Ooor Sedan $ 995 

1966 Volkswagen Kombi But, 3 

seats. Extra dean. $1,195 

PAYHEHT Till MARCH 1. 1173 



f*""^i 



Economic Outlook For 
1973-1974 Seen 'Sunny' 



Thursday, January 18, 1973 Quincy Sun Page 3 



A bright economic outlook 
for 1973 and 1974 was forecast 
by John Dwyer, executive vice 
president of State Street South 
and others who spoke at the 
South Shore Chamber of 
Commerce's "Forecast '73". 

The breakfast-program was 
held last week at the Sheraton 
Tara Motel in Brain tree. An 
estimated 300 people attended. 

Panel members in addition to 
Dwyer were Ralph Tedeschi, 
president of Angelo's 
Supermarkets, and William 
Lamborghim, president of the 
Weymouthport Corporation, 
developers of the condominium 
complex in Weymouth. 
Moderator for the program was 
Charles Pearce, president of the 
Quincy Savings Bank. 

Despite the 8.6% 
unemployment rate in Quincy, 
Dwyer said that all indicators 
show that 1973 will be a good 
year for wholesalers and retailers 
and will surpass levels reached in 
1972. He went on to say that 
the impact [job wise] from 
State Street South would not be 
felt in the area right away 
because a majority of the jobs 



are transfers from the Boston 
office. 

Tedeschi foresaw the coming 
year as a good one for 
supermarkets, but pointed out 
that as compared to most 
businesses, supermarkets operate 
at small profit level. As a matter 
of fact, he explained, in good 
years supermarkets realize a one 
per cent profit as compared to 
5-8% profit in some hardware 
items. Currently, he said, 
supermarkets in the area are 
making a profit of only 9/10% 
on food items. 

Pearce predicted that a good 
supply of building funds would 
be available, with a rate of 7 V* to 
1Vi% for residential construction 
loans. He also expected the 
supply of funds to continue with 
an estimated 10 to 12% growth 
rate of savings bank deposits. 

An extraordinary year for 
condominiums was predicted by 
Lamborghini, who noted that 
the units were beginning to 
become popular in the New 
England area. The complex his 
company buHt in Weymouth, he 
said, passed the $1 million mark 
in sales in less than two months. 



Shipyard Optimistic 



(Cont'd from Page 1 J 

"It is a fact," he said, "that 
today the size of the ship we can 
build and, thus the long range 
future of this yard, is limited not 
by our yard facilities, but by the 
spans of that bridge. 

■'Today, while we are 
working on the first generation 
of LNG tankers, we are in 
excellent competitive position. 



But we may fall behind in the 
next generation of these ships, 
which will inevitably be larger, 
unless that bridge is widened." 
The State Department of 
Public Works is examining the 
possibility of widening the span 
of the bridge, which was built 
more than 35 years ago, and a 
consultant's report is expected 
next summer. 



S 



Drug Education Program 
Tonight At Bryan Post 



A program of drug education 
will be presented tonight 
[Thursday] at 7:30 p.m. at the 
Bryan VFW Post by John J. 
Gannon, the drug abuse 
chairman of the Massachusetts 
VFW. 

The program includes a talk 
on drug abuse, a film on LSD 
[acid], and a drug kit 
demonstrating the various 
narcotics. The public is invited. 



A Massachusetts state trooper 
will also be on hand to show off 
his dog which has been trained 
to sniff out the hiding places of 
marijuana. 

Post Safety Chairman 
Kenneth M. Moore also will talk 
on auto safety and show the 
latest film on safe driving. 

The narcotics program was 
requested by Post Drug 
Chairman Robert Jensen and 
Commander James P. Lynch. 



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ECONOMIC AND RETAIL outlook for this year is sunny according to "Forecast, '73" breakfast 
meeting of South Shore Chamber of Commerce held at Sheraton Tara Hotel, Breintree. From left are 
Chamber President John Blake, and discussion panel members, John Dwyer, executive vice-president 
State Street South; Charles Pearce, president Quincy Savings Bank who was the moderator; Relph 
Tedeschi, president Angelo's Supermarkets and William Lamborghini, president Weymouthport Corp. 

[Quincy Sun Photo] 

CIC Chairman Names Subcommittees 



John J. Lydon Jr., chairman 
of the city's Capital 
Improvement Committee, has 
appointed five subcommittees to 
coordinate the recommendations 
that the CIC has made to Mayor 
Walter J. Hannon. 

They are: 

Public Works Committee: 
Fritz Streiferd, 154 Grandview 



Ave., chairman; Jack Savits, 33 
Newton Ave.; James Vey, 1 1 
Ruthven St.; John McAuliff, 65 
Grogan Ave. 

Public Safety Committee: T. 
David Raftery, 48 Norton Rd, 
chairman; Leo Kelly, 29 Charles 
St.; McAuliff and Savits. 

Health, Hospital and Welfare 
Committee: Wade Burnhauser, 



5 6 Aberdeen Rd, chairman; 
Phyllis Bagen, 782 Southern 
Artery; Jack Kelly, 26 Roberts 
St,; and Streiferd. 

Parks and Recreation 
Committee: Vey, chairman; 
Burnhauser and Jack Kelly. 

Library and Historical Places 
Committee: Leo Kelly, 
chairman; Bagen and Raftery. 



James Donovan To Be Installed 
Quincy Firefighters President 



James Donovan, who served a 
two year term as vice president, 
will be installed as president of 
the Quincy Firefighters 
Association Local 792 AFL-CIO 
tonight [Thursday] at a banquet 



at 7 p.m. at the Morrisette Post 
Home in West Quincy. 

Other officers installed are 
Peter Quinn, vice president; 
George Lamb, treasurer for a 
second term; and Thomas F. 



Gorman Jr., secretary for a 
second term. 

The Rev. Jeremiah Cullinane, 
chaplain of the Massachusetts 
Association of Firefighters, will 
be the featured speaker. 




I 



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Page 4 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 18, 1973 




earns 



By PAUL HAROLD 

Rep. Clifford Marshall was named an assistant majority leader last 
week and two days later, Speaker David Bartley called on Marshall 
to preside over the House during part of the debate on the end the 
war resolution. 

Incidentally, Marshall was appointed to the important Rules 
Committee while keeping his seat on the Committee on Counties. 

*** 

THE OTHER QUINCY representatives also got their committee 
assignments last week. Joseph Brett was renamed chairman of the 
Urban Affairs Committee. Thomas Brownell was named to the 
Judiciary Committee and freshman representative William Delahunt 

to the Election Laws Committee. \ 

• * • 

FRANK DiCESARE OF Quincy Point wants there to be no 
question about it. If the council seat in Ward Two is vacated by 
Marshall, he will definitely be a candidate for councillor. 

There had been talk that DiCesare's company had been against his 
candidacy, but they've given him the green light to run for city 
council if he wants. 

As far as the state representative's seat in Ward Two is concerned, 
DiCesare says he's not interested. 

*** 

THE SPECULATION CORPS hears that three Houghs Neck 
Residents will be among the field of candidates for councillor in 
Ward One. Being mentioned are Robert Denvir, Leo Kelly and John 
McNally. 

Denvir is past president of the Hough's Neck Community 
Council. McNally was a candidate for state representative in the 
special election held in 1971 to fill the seat vacated when Arthur 
Tobin moved up to the Senate. 

Kelly is currently president of the Houghs Neck Community 
Council and was a candidate for council in 1971 . 

Incumbent, Councillor Edward Graham says he will definitely 
seek re-election. 

Meanwhile, warming up for Council At-Large bids are Adeline 
Pompeo of Quincy Point and Ronald Halter of South Quincy. 

*•* 
JOSEPH SHEA, executive secretary to Mayor Hannon and Peter 
O'Neill, assistant to Speaker David Bartley, were among the Quincy 
residents graduating from Suffolk University this semester. 

** -tr 

DEBORAH BUCKLEY of Germantown is the new secretary in 
Mayor Hannon's office. Hired under the emergency employment 
program, she was previously working in Headstart. 

• • • 

MARION ANDREWS, director of senior citizens activities, was 
recently presented three yellow roses by the St. Ann's Senior 
Citizens Club. 

Mrs. Andrews helped organize the club, and each rose represented 
the three years the club has been in existence. 

BY THE WAY, Mrs. Andrews son, Ralph [Gus] Andrews is the 
head basketball coach this year at Catholic Memorial H.S. in West 

Roxbury. 

* * * 

JOSEPH G1LDEA of Montclair, former vice chairman of the 
Park-Recreation Board, is an outspoken proponent of the plan to 
acquire the Mound St. property in Quincy Point for a beach, 

"It could be developed into one of the finest beaches in the city," 
he says. 

HATS OFF to the Quincy Auxiliary Police Dept. 

Since 1968 they've saved the city more than $219,000, 
volunteering more than 10,000 man hours in 1972. 

There are 50 members in the department, headed by Kenneth 
Walsh of South Quincy. 

The Quincy Auxiliary Police also sponsor the Renegades Drum 
and Bugle Corps. It is the only drum and bugle corps in the U.S. that 
is sponsored by an auxiliary police department. And they've recently 
organized a junior drum and bugle corps. 

The senior unit meets Sundays in the Vo-Tech cafeteria and 
Thursday nights at the Commonwealth Armory in Boston. Junior 
corps meets Monday and Wednesday nights in the Q.H.S. cafeteria. 

• * * 

HISTORY REPEATS itself. "Mayors from Quincy and Boston 
met recently and reported that purchase of Squaw Rock was in the 
final stages." 

The above report does not refer to the meeting held last week 
between Mayor Hannon and Mayor White, but rather to a similar 
meeting which took place in 1952. 

The 1952 meeting took place between Quincy Mayor Thomas 
Burgin and Boston Mayor John Hynes and was arranged by Atty. 
Joseph McDonough of Quincy who was then a candidate for state 
senate. 

Let's hope last week's meeting will be more successful. 

Nice to report that George A. Wilson, former Quincy High School 

principal, is out of the hospital and back on the job as secretary of 

the Quincy Kiwanis Club. 

*** 

TYPO TERROR DEPT.: "The bride is a joint venture of the 
Maine Department of Transportation and the New Hampshire 
Department of Public Works and Highway and is expected to be 
open to traffic on Nov. 1 ." - Bangor [Me.] Daily News. 




Jack Anderson 

1972 Pulitzer Prize Winner for National Reporting, and 
Syndicated Columnist for The Quincy Sun 

• Army Warn On Drugs 

% Double Dipping In Treasury 

• Cosa Nostra Wrong Term 



WASHINGTON - The Army, 
alarmed over the sudden rise 
. in drug addiction among 
troops in Europe, has adopted 
stringent measures to catch 
drug users and pushers. 

But the new measures, in 
turn, have alarmed civil 
rights lawyers who fear many 
innocent soldiers may be 
caught in the antidrug 
dragnet. 

We have uncovered one 
document, for instance, which 
was issued last month by Gen. 
Anthony Daskevich in Stut- 
tgart, Germany. He recom- 
mended that commanders 
develop informers and 
reward them for information. 
The general also suggested 
volunteer undercover patrols 
to be established to follow up 
on the informers' tips. 

"Cars entering the post will 
be checked and searched at 
random. ...Volunteers will 
search buildings. ..stem to 
stern," wrote General 
Daskevich. The general urg- 
ed his unit commanders to 
conduct frequent shakedown 
inspections and to bust 
pushers and users to the 
lowest rank as soon as 
evidence is available. 

To handle known drug 
users, the general recom- 
mended the removal of the 
suspect's pass privileges, his 
driver's license, his civilian 
clothes, even the key to his 
room. If the suspect is mar- 
ried, wrote Daskevich, "he 
should be required to move 
into the barracks where he 
can be watched." 

Such measures, the general 
insists, pose no threat to inno- 
cent soldiers. But civil liber- 
ties lawyers charge that inno- 
cent soldiers have already 
been hurt by some of the ex- 
treme methods used to catch 
the guilty. 

Double Dippers 

For years, we have criticiz- 
ed retired officers for double 
dipping from the federal 
treasury. The practice began 
nearly a decade ago when 
Congress passed the Dual 
Compensation Act. Thanks to 



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this law, more than 78,000 
retired military personnel to- 
day collect part of their pen- 
sion and draw civil service 
pay at the same time. 

Double dipping has helped 
create a military spoils 
system, which encourages rig- 
ged recruitment, preferential 
treatment, unfair hiring and 
promotional practices. 

Retired militarymen fre- 
quently alert friends about to 
retire of job openings in the 
federal government. In some 
cases, jobs have been held 
open for months awaiting the 
retirement of ranking mili- 
tary officers. In other in- 
stances, new jobs have been 
created solely to fit the needs 
of retiring officers. 

But among the worst 
abusers of the law are some 
70 flag officers now working 
in the civilian government. 
Some of them collect more 
than $50,000 a year from their 
combined military retire- 
ment and civilian pay. 

The juiciest double dipping 
deal we have come across in- 
volves retired four-star Air 
Force Gen. Jacob Smart, who 
is now an assistant ad- 
ministrator at the National 
Aeronautics and Space Ad- 
ministration. He collects 
around $58,000 a year, includ- 
ing more than $22,000 in 
retirement benefits. 

Other double-dippers in- 
clude Lt. General Alfred 
Starbird, now a civilian at the 
Pentagon, Lt. Gen. Ben Davis, 
now at Transportation and 
Brig. Gen. Frank Elliot at 
Agriculture. 

One general is so overpaid, 
he voluntarily has cut his own 
salary by $14,000 a year. He is 
Gen. Jackson Graham, now 
chief of the Washington area 
Metro Authority, who accepts 
less than $38,000 of his 
authorized $52,000 salary. 
With $17,000 a year in retire- 
ment benefits, Graham would 
become the most lucrative 
double-dipper in the country 
if he accepted his full salary. 
Graham tells us that's a dis- 
tinction he can do without. 



Behind the Scenes 
IS HANOI HOPEFUL? - 
North Vietnam's master 
negotiator, Le Due Tho, has 
been surprisingly moderate 
in his private conversations 
in Paris. He has echoed Hen- 
ry Kissinger's October state- 
ments that a cease-fire agree- 
ment is attainable and that 
only a few remaining 
problems need to be ironed 
out. This is opposite to the at- 
titude he was expected to 
take. A secret intelligence 
analysis had suggested that 
he would be grim and un- 
compromising as a reflection 
of Hanoi's anger over the 
bombing. Nevertheless, the in- 
telligence reports from Paris 
say Le Due Tho has been the 
model of reasonableness in his 
private conversations with 
diplomats. 

THE WRONG THING' - It 
now appears that the famous 
underworld informer Joe 
Valachi never meant to say 
"Cosa Nostra," which means 
"our thing." in describing the 
underworld crime syndicate. 
We recently saw the old FBI 
records of Valachi's initial in- 
terrogations. What Valachi 
repeated throughout the ques- 
tioning was the phrase "Causa 
Nostra," which means "our 
cause." The agent who ques- 
tioned Valachi confirmed to 
us that the term "Cosa 
Nostra," now a popular 
English idiom, was the result 
of a typographical error. 

STARS AGAINST NIXON - 
Liberal movie stars Warren 
Beatty, Jack Nicholson and 
Julie Christie are so outraged 
over President Nixon's failure 
to end the Vietnam War that 
they are considering 
measures to embarrass the 
President publicly. Jack 
Nicholson has told us he will 
troop up to Capitol Hill next 
month in hopes of convincing 
Congress to impeach the 
President. Nicholson insists 
he will follow through with the 
lobbying effort if a Vietnam 
settlement is not reached by 
February 20. 



Barbara Ann Taync Wins Elks Award 



Barbara Ann Tayne of 
Braintree, who was sponsored by 
the Quincy Lodge of Elks, is 
first place winner in the Girls 
Division of the Massachusetts 
Elks Association youth 
leadership contest. * 

Miss Tayne wins $250 in cash 



and a $500 credit toward a 
college scholarship. She is also 
entered in the elks national 
youth leadership contest with a 
chance to win awards ranging up 
to $2,000 at the Elks National 
Convention in July. 




Published weekly on Thursday by 
The Quincy San Publishing Company 
1 601 Hancock Stmt, Qacacy, Mauacansetu 02169 
Publuher and Editor 
Henry W.Bosworth, Jr. 
10* Per Copy $3.50 Per Year 

Out of State $4 JO Per Year 
Telephone; 471-3100 47 1-3 101 



Pail at Boston, Mast, 
MEMBER NEW ENGLAND PRESS ASSOCIATION 




Thursday, January 18, 1973 Quincy Sun Page 5 



• Youth Speaks Out 

• Open campus has been renamed for the fourth time to MEDIC - 
Maximum Education in Campus. We think it should be shortened to 
four letters-CAGE. 

• Maximum Education In Campus - rather an odd name when 
students cannot use the Thomas Crane Library, one of the best 
libraries in the state during their free time. 

•• A lot of people think Christmas ends on Christmas day when it 
really just begins. 

• Paris Peace Talks--a piece here and a piece there but they never 
seem to fit together. 

• When you turn on the television you may think you are watching 
reruns from last summer-football. 

• Funny how the free movies on television are better than the 
movies you pay $3.75_for. 

• President Nixon's inaugural address will sound like a broken 
record. 

Q.H.S. Journalism Class 

• QUESTION OF THE WEEK 
Can Yon Speak On Bill*? 



Can Massachusetts citizens 
speak on behalf of proposed 
legislation? The answer is yes, 
according to the League of 
Women Voters Voter 
Information Phone. 

The question was brought up 
by a caller concerned about a 
particular bill before the 
legislature. The League indicated 
that there was indeed a way for 
him to speak on behalf of the 
bill. 

There is a public hearing held 
by the assigned legislative 
committee on all bills. These 
hearings are open to the public, 
and citizens may listen and/or 



testify. To learn the date of the 
hearing before a particular 
committee, interested citizens 
should call their own state 
legislator, the House or Senate 
clerk at the State House, or the 
Voter Information Phone. 

This question is one of many 
now being received by the 
League of Women Voters' Voter 
Information Phone. Individuals 
with any questions on 
government may call the VIP 
Phone Monday through Friday 
between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. The 
number in the Boston area is 
357-5880. 



•Letter Box 

Heartfelt Thanks To 
A Great Quincy Fire Dept. 



Editor, Quincy Sun: 

Our many heartfelt thanks to 
the Fire Department of Quincy 
for the job well done in 
extinguishing a fire at 102 
Phipps Street on December 22, 
1972, and for their generous act 
of playing Santa Claus for our 
seven children who had lost all 
hopes of Christmas in the fire. 

Their swiftness in putting out 
the fire and their act of 



generosity with the presents, 
turkey and fruit basket will 
never be forgotten by our 
families. Our hats go off to the 
members of Firefighters Local 
792. The people of Quincy 
should realize what a great 
bunch of guys and what 
professional men they are. 

From the families of 

Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas Fantasia 

Mr. and Mrs. David Kuja 

Mr. Joseph DiSciullo 



Criticizes Council President 



Editor, Quincy Sun: 

Arthur Tobin [D-Quincy] 
reportedly will be named 
vice-chairman of the senate's 
powerful Ways and Means 
Committee. Senate President 
Harrington tapped Tobin for his 
new committee post because of 
his leadership of the council and 
because Of His Work With The 
Democratic Party In Quincy!!! 

When Joe Brett, a lifelong 
Democrat ran for the office of 
Mayor of the City of Quincy, 
our able leaders of the Quincy 
Democratic Party could not be 



found. 

Quincy is controlled by 
Democrats and they were afraid 
of Helping Joe Brett!! 

Arthur Tobin has been 
elected to another term as 
President of the City Council. If 
someone else were elected 
instead of Tobin the tax 
situation between the QTR and 
the City of Quincy would have 
been different! 

A different City Council 
President would have favored 
the Quincy Taxpayers Revolt 
and stood up for the Rights of 
the Taxpayers of Quincy! !! 

Ron Halter 
Quincy Democrat 



Appreciates 'Wonderful' Coverage 
Of Quincy Band Trip To Dallas 



Editor, Quincy Sun: 

I want to thank you so very 
much for the wonderful 
coverage you have given the 
'•Quincy High School Band" 
before and after their trip to 
Dallas. 

It gives people such a great 
deal of pleasure to have a paper 



write about the good things 
done by good boys and girls 
instead of always the bad things. 

It is certainly a paper to have 
delivered and to read in the 
home. 

[Mrs.) Albert P. King 

38 Charlesmount Ave.Quincy 
P.S. My brother in Florida 
thinks its great also. 



Consumer 
Corner 



By ROBERT H. QUINN 
Attorney General 

"Fly-by-night" travel agencies 
have lured and entrapped many 
unsuspecting Massachusetts 
residents, particularly in the 
academic community, with 
advertisements of exotic 
vacations at Charter flight group 
rates. 

In many instances these 
consumers have been stranded 
with no return tickets or no 
bookings on flights. 

To prevent individuals from 
being "taken in" in the coming 
vacation seasons, my Consumer 
Protection Division has proposed 
legislation requiring that travel 
agencies engaged in arranging 
charter flights be licensed and 
bonded by the commissioner of 
public safety. 

According to the bill a person 
who wishes to engage in the 
charter flight business must first 
file a financial statement with 
the state auditor. After the 
auditor exa mines the 
information and determines that 
the potential agent is financially 
solvent, he would submit the 
application to the commissioner of 
public safety. If the 
commissioner finds that the 
person meets the requirements, 
he would grant the agent a 
one-year renewable license. 

The bill provides penalties if 
the agent is unable to perform 
commitments to customers. 
Before going into the charter 
flight business the agent must 
post a bond of $25,000, which 
would be used to reimburse 
travelers should they suffer a 
loss due to unfulfilled promises. 

In the past some agencies 
charged travelers for round-trip 
tickets. However the agents 
bought one-way tickets, 
pocketed the remainder of the 
money and hoped that they 
would have enough to buy 
return tickets for the travelers at 
the end of the vacation period. 

However, often vacationers 
would arrive at airports for 
return flights only to find that 
reservations did not exist. They 
were then forced to pay 
commercial air fare home. 

According to the terms of the 
proposed legislation violations 
on the part of the agent would 
result uvthe loss of the license to 
arrange charter flights. In 
addition violations would be 
punishable by up to six months 
in jail, a fine of up to $5,000 or 
both. 



Give- 
to. the.' 

March 
of Dime 



THIS »PAC« CONTHIBUTID •* TH« FU»LI»MI 



For Home 
Or Office 

Delivery 




Call 
471-3100 



Living, Today 

By Dr. William F. Knox 
Personal Counselor 



To Talk Or Not To Talk' 

"My life is an open book," said Frank. "I've done a lot of 
things.. .some I'm proud of.. .some I'm not. When I blunder, I try to 
rectify it, talk it out, then get on with living. I have nothing to 
hide." Not many people can say that. Frank's wife, Ruth, couldn't. 
Frank doesn't know where he stands with Ruth... because she doesn't 
talk. "Fifteen years with her and I still don't know what she feels," 
he said. He longs for good dialogue with Ruth... but she won't talk. 
The marriage is in jeopardy. 

Often it's the man who won't talk. Until a person realizes the 
seriousness of his/her silence, it's not likely to change. The refusal to 
talk is insulting to the other person, whether so intended or not. It's 
a form of rejection...creates a serious gulf between two persons. It 
usually is a sign of personal insecurity, perhaps irresponsibility in the 
relationship. How do you like a doctor who won't talk with you?. ..a 
waitress?.. .a hair dresser?. ..worst of all is the husband/wife. 
Communication is essential to any relationship. 

People who won't talk often have other symptoms of relationship 
sickness. "No-Talkers" are often loners. ..find it difficult to be with 
other people. ..usually have few or no friends. The "No-Talker" often 
gives the impression that he/she is disapproving of the person he/she 
is with. For a husband/wife to have to live with this is devastating. 

Reasons often given for the condition are not very satisfying. "I 
was ignored as a child".. ."I was made to keep quiet as a child". .."My 
parents never talked". .."I was an only child and no one talked with 
me"..."Don't tell everyone your private business". Usually, however, 
the "No-Talk" person doesn't give a reason. ..maybe doesn't even see 
that he has a problem. Whatever the cause, it can be overcome. 

How? First and foremost the "No-Talk" person must become 
aware of the seriousness of the dis-ease. You don't fix a flat tire until 
you become aware that the car isn't rolling properly. One doesn't fix 
the "flat life" caused by not talking until one becomes aware that 
his/her life isn't rolling. Usually a person doesn't discover this alone. 
It's usually the partner who forces the issue. ..by storming 
angrily...by having an affair which he/she may hope will be 
discovered. ..some way to get the message across before the complete 
erosion of love takes place. Somehow the "No-Talk" person must 
become aware of the seriousness of the dis-ease of not entering into 
wholesome dialogue with the partner. 

Secondly... recognize what the "No-Talk" way of life does to 
oneself. It makes one dull... people shun this person because they are 
uncomfortable around them.. .they shrivel instead of grow. They 
become more and more withdrawn. ..the world passes them by. It 
can errode their whole being. 

Thirdly...when a person become aware of the seriousness of the 
dis-ease... and the devastating results to themselves and others.. .then 
start talking. Start by asking questions. Ask two questions of ten 
different people. See how much you learn. ..how much you'll have to 
talk about. 

By the time you've finished asking two questions of ten people, 
you'll have begun to talk more easily. If you don't. ..better get some 
professional help. 

For People Are For Loving, Dr. Knox's new book, write him 
sending $3 to 320 Washington St., Norwell, Mass. 02061 

FOR YOUR COMMENTS: Group Therapy, or Private 
Counselling, write Dr. Knox at 628 High St., Dedham, or call 

326-5990 or 659-7595. 

Federal Income Tax Guide 
On Sale At Post Offices 

Postmaster George K. Walker 
announces the official Internal 
Revenue Service guide, "Your 
Federal Income Tax", is on sale 
again this year at all post offices 
in the Boston Postal District. 

The booklet provides 
assistance to taxpayers filing 
separate or joint returns. It 
contains sample completed 



forms with entries keyed to 
appropriate pages and many 
clear examples of allowable 
expenses, deductions and 
contributions. 

Postmaster Walker said this 
year's revised edition, priced at 
75 cents, is expected to be 
another "best seller". 



TICKLE BOX 



by Ted Trogdon 





12-1 1 



"You and your sauna baths!" 



Page 6 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 18, 1973 



Wollaston Eastern Star Antiques Show Jan. 21 




ANTIQUES SHOW - Mrs. Virgil L. Snell, chairman of the steering 
committee [left] and Mrs. Willard Walton admire some of the Rose 
Medallion and cut glass pieces that will be at the South Shore 
Antiques Show. 

Anne Belson Art Exhibit 
At North Quincy Library 



Miss Anne M. Belson of 
Wollaston is exhibiting her 
portrait paintings in the North 
Quincy Branch of the Thomas 
Crane Public Library, through 
January. 

She works in various media 
including charcoal, pastel and 
watercolor. 

Miss Belson received her 
Master of Education from 
Boston State College; a Bachelor 
of Arts and Bachelor of Fine 
Arts at Emmanuel College; and 
went to Boston University for 
additional study in drawing and 
design. She also studied 
watercolor at Massachusetts 
College of Art. 



Formerly Miss Belson taught 
art in the Hull and Stoughton 
Public Schools, and later worked 
as technical illustrator for the 
Smithsonian Observatory. She is 
presently employed by a Boston 
bank, where she prepares 
illustrations and cover designs 
for publications. 

She has exhibited paintings in 
the Boston area and in galleries 
at Hyannis and Falmouth. She 
has worked as a portrait artist in 
Belmont and Hyannis, and also 
at a number of functions in the 
South Shore area. Currently she 
is doing free-lance pastel and 
charcoal portraits. 



The 18th Annual South 
Shore Antiques Show and Sale, 
sponsored by Wollaston Chapter, 
Order of the Eastern Star, will 
be held Jan. 21-22-23 at Quincy 
Masonic Temple. 

Thirty selected dealers will 
present exhibits. 

Small pieces of furniture will 
be featured by several 
exhibitors, and there will be 
booths almost entirely devoted 
to art glass, pattern glass, dolls 
and jewelry. Books and 
magazines dealing with antiques 
will be on display and for sale. 

Home-cooked food will be 
served in the Snack Bar. The 
Snack Bar will open at 1 1 : 30 for 
lunch, and remain open during 
the show hours, which are from 
1 to 10 P.M. daily. 

Mrs. Peter I. Thiessen of 
Quincy is general chairman of 
the show. The steering 
committee includes Mrs. Virgil 
L. Snell, Chairman, Mrs. Arthur 
I. Senter, both of Quincy, and 
Mrs. Addison H. Hathaway of 
Weymouth. Tickets will be 
available at the door. 





&S> 



Marriage 
Intentions 



Alan J. Ames, 488 Beale St., 
Quincy, self-employed; Eleanor 
M. Carter, 1646 Great Plain 
Ave., Needham, student. 

James M. Horsfor<J, 87 
Albatross Rd, Quincy, student; 
Susan J. LaMountain, 173 
Leicester St., Auburn, student. 



MARRIED - Mrs. Wayne W. Johnson is the former Ann Marie 
MacDonald, daughter of Mrs. J. A. MacDonald of 32 Courtney Rd, 
West Roxbury, and the late Mr. MacDonald. Her husband is the son 
of Mr. and Mrs. Ernest P. Johnson of 75 East Elm Ave., Wollaston. 
The bride is a graduate of Mt. St. Joseph Academy in Brighton and is 
attending Catherine Laboure School of Nursing. Mr. Johnson is a 
graduate of Quincy Vocational Technical High School and is 
working as a mechanic in Quincy. After a wedding trip to Cape Cod, 
the Johnsons are living in Wollaston. 

[Miller Studio] 

Wollaston Woman Juniors 
Mother-Daughter Banquet 



SSARC To Install Officers 
At Dinner Dance Jan. 27 



John W. 
South St., 
Donna M. 



Houghton, 188 

Quincy, laborer; 

MacPherson. 



Blueberry 
home. 



Rd, Plymouth, at 



The parents of SSARC are 
planning their annual dinner 
dance and installation of officers 
for 1973, at the Sheraton-Tara 
Hotel, Braintree, Jan. 27 at 8 
p.m. 

The officers are: president 
Thomas H. O'Connor, Braintree; 
first vice president, Arnold 
Rinkofsky, Milton; second vice 
president, James Delaney, 
Quincy; treasurer John J. 
Connolly, Weymouth; financial 
secreatary Mrs. Carl Kirsch, 
Hingham; recording secretary 
Mrs. Francis Mischler, Braintree; 



corresponding secretary Mrs. 
Peter Fontana, South 
Weymouth; Immediate past 
president is James Gutzwiller, 
Hingham. 

Chairwoman for the dinner 
dance is Mrs. Steinar Midttun of 
Braintree. Honorary chairman is 
Thomas J. Flatley, of the Flatley 
Co. 

Music will be by Earl 
Hannafin's Orchestra. A social 
will be from 7 to 8 p.m. 
Reservations may be made by 
calling Mrs. Steinar Midttun at 
843-3781. 



Daniel Fraser, 238 Highland 
Ave., Quincy, N.E. Telephone 
Co.; Maureen Gulizia, 44 
Ratchford St., Quincy, typist. 

Daniel F. Battles, 75 
Seminole St., Mattapan, student; 
Janice L . Culkin, 47 
Independence Ave., Quincy, 
waitress. 

Stephen E. Cayon, 52 
Marlboro St., Quincy, clerk; 
Patricia A. Richards, 29 Beach 
St., Quincy, auto rater. 



Wollaston Women's Club 
Juniors will hold their 
mother-daughter banquet 
tonight [Thursday] at 6:30 p.m. 
at Blinstrub's Old Colony House 
in Dorchester. 

E. G. Matthews of Braintree, 
hypnotist and lecturer, will 



entertain with a one man 
audience participation program. 

Mrs. Timothy Tobin is 
chairman of the event and Mrs. 
Frederick Flukes will preside at 
the business meeting following 
the dinner. 



Kathleen Hughes To Be 
Installed Rainbow Advisor 



'Our Neighbor Dorchester' Historical Society Topic 

7:30 p.m. at a regular meeting of 
the Quincy Historical Society in 
United First Parish Church. 

The program is the fifth in a 
series on the histories of 
neighboring towns. 



Vincent P. Sullivan, president 
of the Dorchester Historical 



Society, will speak 
Neighbor Dorchester' 



on "Our 
Jan. 25 at 



Quincy Sons Of Italy 
Social Center 

120 Quarry St. Quincy 

Newest function hall now available for weddings, showers, dinner 
dances. Main [Golden Lion] Suite has cathedral ceiling. Brides 
room - ultra modern sound system. Completely air conditioned. 

FOR RESERVATION CALL 
773-2687 AFTER 2 P.M. 



1531 Hoik* fc St., Quincy 

Mm. Thrt Sit. II 
Thirt. ft Fri. Til 

CLEARANCE 
SALE 

Suits, Dresses 
and Robes 



20% to 50% Off 
Sizes 8-20 




' Many different styles! 



Kathleen Robin Hughes, 
daughter of Mrs. Kathryn 
Hughes of 229 Arlington St., 
Wollaston, will be installed as 
worthy advisor of the Wollaston 
Rainbow Assembly Saturday at 
8 p.m. at* the Quincy Masonic 
Temple. 

Other officers to be installed 
include: 

Barbara Sang, worthy 
associate advisor; Gail 
Whitehead, charity; Roberta 
Ferguson, hope; Gail Wardup, 
faith; Linda Younie, recorder; 
Donna Shaw, treasurer; Jayne 
Younie, chaplain; Gail Goracky, 
drill leader. 

Joyce Abbott, love; Jackie 
Deware, religion; Lorelei Barton, 
nature; Vicky Foye' 
immortality; Jayne Colling 
fidelity; Karen Walsh, 
patriotism; Karen Foye, service- 
Phyllis Morse, confidential 
observer. 

Cynthia Gunnison, outer 
observer; Linda Lee, choir 
director; Ruth Widman, 
musician; Darlene Bocash, 
American flag; Linda Walker', 
state flag; Janet Lander, Grand 
Christian; Pamela West, Christian 
Christian; Diane Andrews, 
Rainbow flag. 

Susan White, assembly 
banner; Wanda Johnson, page 
west; Nancy Costa, page east 

****************************** 




18th Annual 
South Shore at Quincy 

ANTIQUE 
SHOW 

Sun.- Mon. -Tues. 

(JAN. 21-22-231 

1- 10 P.M. 
MASONIC TEMPLE 

Quincy Square 

OES Chapter #156 
Robert E Mower. Mgr. 

deduced *dmission 
after 4 p.m. Sunday 
S1 25 with this adv 



L 



PERMANENT REMOVAL 

OF UNWANTED HAIR 

Lola F. Kilduff, R.E. 

Registered and Licensed Electrohgist 

For Man and Woman 
By Appointment Only • Day or Evening 
Consultations Invited 
Hancock St.. Quincy Suite 8 773-1532 



KATHLEEN HUGHES 

green; Katherine Rowell, page 
east blue; Bonnie Sullivan, 
assembly greeter. 

Choir: Cindy Gunnison, 
Diane Andrews, Karen Jennette, 
Dorothy Woodward, Cheryl 
Colon, Karen ■ Bishop, Joanne 
Baxendale, Kathryn Engelke and 
Cindy Allen. 

— ■■ m mil - 



For Home 
Delivery 

Of The 

Coll 
471-3100 



**#> 



DERRINGER 

THE FLORIST 
Hants Arrangements Mowers 



Jt9 Hancock SI. 



■ - 



Thursday, January 18, 1973 Quincy Sun Page 7 




ENGAGED •• Mr. and Mrs. John A. MacDonald of 344 Rock Island 
Rd, Quincy, announce the engagement of their daughter. Donna 
Rosslyn MacDonald to Francis P. Goodfellow. He is the son of Mr. 
and Mrs. John Goodfellow of 29 Marked Tree Rd, Needham. Miss 
MacDonald graduated from Sacred Heart High School and attended 
Northeastern University and Children's Hospital School of Nursing. 
Mr. Goodfellow graduated from Needham High School, attended 
Mass. Bay Community College and is now attending Bryant & 
Stratton Junior College evenings. He served four years with the U.S. 
Navy as an electronics technician. Both are employed by the Internal 
Revenue Service, Boston. A March 24 wedding is planned. 

[Pagar Studios] 

St. John's CYO Dance Friday 



St. John's CYO will meet 
today [Thursday] in the rectory 
to finalize arrangements for their 
dance to be held at the Quincy 
Armory Friday. 

The "Techniques" will 
provide the main music for this 
dance, and "The Formations" 
will be the back-up hand. 

Many letters ol appreciation 
were received by the CYO for 
their various apostolic projects 
last month. The State Welfare 
Office commended them for 
their program in which 
underprivileged children were 
taken on a shopping tour and 
given the opportunity to 
purchase gifts for parents or 
family. Medfield State Hospital 
expressed the happiness the 
patients of the Quincy Ward 

Jeffrey Hughes 

Initiated Into 
Phi-Beta-Kappa 

Jeffrey E. Hughes, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Ellis L. Hughes of 262 
Granite St., Quincy, was 
recently initiated into the 
honorary society of Phi Beta 
Kappa at Boston University. He 
is a senior and is majoring in 
Marine Biology. 



received at the party given by 
the CYO. Servicemen, elderly, 
shut-ins, enjoyed the gifts, 
caroling and cards sent to them. 

Saturday, Jan. 27 will be 
Theatre Night for the CYO, 
when they will view the 
performance of "Godspell". 

Members of the CYO who 
wish to volunteer an hour a 
week for the new program of 
visitation with the elderly are 
asked to contact Michelle 
Cheney, President. 

The third annual CYO 
Variety Show is being scheduled 
for the end of April. Members 
are asked to submit their skits to 
Michelle Cheney or Fr. Joseph 
Connolly as soon as possible. 

Deposits for the February Ski 
Trip must be made by Jan. 28. 



JEWELERS 




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Quincy, Maw 

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At Quincy City Hospital 
January 8 

Mr. and Mrs. Ronald A. 
DeLorenzo, 90 Dysart St., a son. 

January 9 

Mr.- and Mrs. Joseph J. 
Driscoll, 484 Quincy Ave., a 
daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. John M. 
Driscoll, 96 Elliot Ave., a son. 

January 10 

Mr. and Mrs. John F. Carey, 
62 East Elm Ave., a daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles A. 
Moschella, 219 Taf frail Rd, a 
daughter. 

January 1 1 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas F. 
Sullivan, 5 1 Harris St.. a 
daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs.. Patrick H. 
Walsh, 17 Whiton Ave., a son. 

Mr. and Mrs. William 
Frawley, 128 Arnold St., a 
daughter. 

January 12 

Mr. and Mrs. David Campbell, 
22 Hall Place, a son. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Baroud, 
17TrescottSt., a son. 

January 13 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Hanlon, 87 
South St., a son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Andrew 
Backman, 9 Holmes St., a son. 

January 15 

Mr. and Mrs. Mark 
Dickenson, 598 South St., a son. 

Boston Hospital for Women 

December 22 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael 
McCann, 50 Davis St., a son. 

At St. Margaret's Hospital 

January 6 

Mr. and Mrs. Attilius K. 
Cheng, a daughter. 

January 7 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Killelea, 
58 Scotch Pond Place, a son. 




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ENGAGED -- Mr. and Mrs. Joseph D. Lawlor of 144 Quincy Ave., 
Quincy, announce the engagement of their daughter, Monica Jean 
Lawlor to Thomas D. Hickey. He is the son of Mrs. James Hickey of 
102 Edwards St., Quincy, and the late Mr. Hickey. Miss Lawlor, who 
is employed by the City of Quincy, graduated from Archbishop 
Williams High School and received a BA in mathematics from 
Stonehill College. Mr. Hickey, a student at Quincy Junior College, 
attended Foxboro schools. He served three years in the Army, 
including duty in Vietnam. He is employed by Electrolux 
Corporation, Quincy. An October wedding is planned. 

[Blackwell Studio] 

Sculpture Exhibit By 
Fayette Taylor At Library 



The Trustees of Thomas 
Crane Public Library announce 
an exhibition of sculpture by 
Fayette Taylor in the Main Hall 
Art Gallery now through Jan. 
31.. 

Taylor, a Brookline resident, 
has attained distinction in two 
careers; as Professor of 
Engineering at M.I.T. from 1926 
to 1960, and as a creative artist. 
Since retirement he has become 
nationally known for the 
construction of metallic 
sculpture. 



He has had numerous 
one-man exhibitions, has pieces 
in several museums and private 
collections both in the U.S.A. 
and abroad. A recent 
commission is a large hanging 
sculpture, "Upward Bound", at 
the Hurley Building in 
Government Center, Boston. 

Taylor's work has great 
variety and includes animal 
studies, abstract arrangements 
and several "Kinetic" or moving 
pieces as well as collages using 
wood and stone. 



Mr.,Mrs. Michael McCann Parents 



Mr. and Mrs. Michael McCann 
of 50 Dav'x St., Wollaston, are 
the parents of a son, Christopher 



Michael, born Dec. 22 at Boston 
Hospital for Women. He is their 
first child. 



COLPITIS SSfffSi 

1550 Hancock St., Quincy 472-005 1 

Call Colpitis Now 472-0051 

Take A 
Bermuda Break 

In Rendezvous Time' 

We will be happy to 
arrange your vacationl 



JK 



%., 



Off Season Rates Are Now 
In Effect Until March 



- 



Page 8 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 18, 1973 



DEATHS 



Edwin N. Soul, 51, of 35 
Schlager Ave., on arrival at 
Quincy City Hospital, Jan, 7. 

Mrs. Ada (Hayward/ Kenney, 
of 18 Charlesmont Ave., in a 
local nursing home, Jan. 9. 

Mrs. Sarah [Jackson] Flynn, 
69, of 109 Curtis Ave., at the 
John Scott Nursing Home, 
Braintree, Jan. 9. 

Benjamin J. Parrotta of 59 
West Elm A ve., at his home, Jan. 
9. 

Arthur Fox, 83, of 311 Beal 
St., at Quincy City Hospital, 
Jan. 9. 

Miss Nora C. Donovan, 74, of 
20 Hatherly Rd, at Quincy City 
Hospital, Jan. 9. 

Mrs. Frances /Lincoln/ Long, 
55, of 32 Lochslea Rd, 
Littleton, formerly of Quincy, at 
Emerson Hospital, Concord, Jan. 
9. 

John W. Pringle, 53, of 69 
Taffrail Rd, at Carney Hospital, 
Dorchester, Jan. 9. 

Richard H. Delaney, 63, of 
43 Lawn Ave., at Chelsea 
Soldiers Home, Jan. 10. 

Mrs. Ann [Lynch J Kiley, 68, 
of 30 Ruthven St., at Quincy 
City Hospital, Jan. 10. 

Edward J. Keefe, 51, of 27 
Westford St., at Quincy City 
Hospital, Jan. 10. 

Matthew J. Ryan, 71, of 2 
Snug Harbor Court, at Quincy 
City Hospital, Jan. 10. 

Lionel A. Choquette, 64, of 
78 Lenox St., at his home, Jan. 
11. 

John D. MacKenzie, 67, of 11 
Hersey Place, at his home, Jan. 
12. 

Dominic A. Polvere, 61, of 42 
School St., at the Veterans 
Administration Hospital, West 
Roxbury, Jan. 13. 



Miss Florence A. Sternberg, 
75, of 80 Elm A ve., at Carney 
Hospital, Dorchester, Jan. 12. 

Walter A. Seymour, 83, of 71 
Sealund Rd, at Chelsea Naval 
Hospital, Jan. 13. 

David J. Reardon, 84, of 28 
Wollaston Ave., at the 
Presidential Manor Nursing 
Home, Jan. 13. 

Joseph H. Carroll, 82, 
formerly of Linden Court, in a 
local nursing home, Jan. 13. 

Francesco S. Gagliardi, 80, of 
51 Taylor St., at Quincy City 
Hospital, Jan. 13. 

Mrs. Margaret T. [O'RiordanJ 
Bletzer of 12 Bass St., at Quincy 
City Hospital, Jan. 13. 



Raymond R. Kline, 55, of 10 
Stephens St., unexpectedly at 
Quincy City Hospital, Jan. 14. 

Mrs. Mary R. [Corrigan] 
Regnier, 80, of 147 Governors 
Rd, at Quincy City Hospital, 
Jan. 13. 

Mrs. Maria [ Biodini] 
Barbadoro, 80, of 64 Verchild 
St., unexpectedly at Quincy City 
Hospital, Jan. 13. 

Mrs. Ida [Lawson] Nordman, 
85, of 19 Briar Circle, Bass 
River, formerly of Quincy, 
unexpectedly at her home, Jan. 
13. 

Matteo Salverio, 77, of 316 
Summer St., Weymouth, 
formerly of Quincy, at Quincy 
City Hospital, Jan. 14. 

Lucien J. Desserres, 52, of 11 
Albion Rd, at the Veterans 
Administration Hospital, 
Jamaica Plain, Jan. 14. 

Edward F. Kennedy, 61, of 
19 Grossman St., at Quincy City 
Hospital, Jan. 15. 



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Mrs. George Stephen Installed 
President Church Women United 



Mrs. George Stephen of First 
Presbyterian Church was elected 
and installed president of 
Church Women United in 
Quincy at Friday night's annual 
meeting at Quincy Point 
Congregational Church. 

Rev. Robert Anderson of 
First Presbyterian Church 
installed also Mrs. Lillian 
Tokarski of Wollaston Church of 
the Nazarene, vice president; 
Miss Mildred DeBoer of Bethany 
Congregational Church, 
recording secretary; Miss Lydia 
Randall of Wollaston 
Congregational Church, 
corresponding secretary; Mrs. 
Clarence Churchill of Wollaston 
Baptist Church, treasurer; and 
Mrs. Robert Jack of First 
Presbyterian Church, auditor. 

Committee chairmen installed 
were Mrs. John Smith of First 
Presbyterian Church, spiritual 
life; Mrs. Leon Mclntyre of First 
Church of Squantum, Christian 
World Relations; Mrs. Kenneth 



Yoerger of Adams Shore 
Community Church, Christian 
Social Relations; Mrs. Joseph 
MacRitchie of First Church of 
Squantum, Christian World 
Mission. 

Mrs. Churchill, finance 
committee chairman; Mrs. 
Tokarski, Cummunion service 
and breakfast committee 
chairman; Mrs. Alfred Minyard 
of Quincy Centre Methodist 
Church, prayer groups; Miss 

Randall, special projects; Mrs. 
Richard Wainwright, public 
relations; Mrs. Edith Sylva, Mrs. 
H. Wallace Sylvester, Mrs. 
Alexander Daffinee and Mrs. 
Donald Robinson, nominating 
committee. 

Mrs. Sylvester, retiring 
president, was presented with a 
gift from her executive board by 
Mrs. Mark Adair, retiring vice 
president. 

Devotions at the program 



were led by Mrs. Lloyd F. 
Martin of Wollaston 
Congregational Church, spiritual 
life chairman. David Baharian of 
Quincy Point Congregational 
Church was organist; Mrs. Earl 
Goodspeed And Mrs. Marion 
Rogers were ushers. 

Charles Dimond, director of 
Survival, Inc., urged that the 
church women write their 
legislators and the mayor asking 
additional police aid to stop 
drug traffic in Quincy, the third 
largest drug using community in 
the state, he said. 

More up-to-date education 
for both children and parents is 
also needed, Dimond stated, 
estimating that drug users in the 
community range from 10 to 52 
years of age. 

He expects that Survival, Inc., 
whose primary function is to 
rehabilitate, will move into its 
new Hancock St. facility by Feb 
1. 

More than 75 women 
attended the annual dinner 
meeting. 



Hammett Company Employees 
Donate 34 Pints Of Blood 



Mrs. Mildred Ambrosia, 
acting Blood Donor chairman 
for the Greater Quincy Red 
Cross Chapter, reports that 34 
pints of blood were donated 
recently when the" Red Cross 
Bloodmobile visited the J. L. 
Hammett Company for a two 
hour period. 

Those donating were: 

Elizabeth S. Abbott, George 
W. Alexander Jr., Dorothy H. 
Anderson, Bonnie J. Bardon, 
Richard A. Broadford, David J. 
Concheri, Harvey S. Corkum, 



Richard J. Daley, Thomas C. 
Dempsey, George J. Devine, 
Noreen M. Ferraro, Alvan T. 
Forrest, Beatrice D. Foster, 
Joseph G. Fuda, Marie E. 
Goldsmith, Richard C. Jones, 
Richard J. Jones, Bernice M. 
Knopp, Ruth F. Lynch, Frederik 
C. Maler, Jane E. Miller. 

Henry Minasian, Frances M. 
Munichiello, Lawrence W. 
Murphy, Richard A. McNeil, 
Barbara L. Parnaby, Kerry S. 
Perrotta, James H. Pollock Jr., 
Agatha M. Prespolis, Donald F. 



Schermerhorn, Rosann M. 
Shdeed, Charles F. Smith, 
Geraldine E. Thompson, Janice 
Tibbetts, Stephen L. Wilcox, 
Carolyn D. Wildes. 

Mrs. Mildred Ambrosia, in 
charge of the volunteers, was 
assisted by Miss Caroline Crane, 
Mrs. Helen Ottaviani, Miss 
Gladys Kingman, Mrs. Helen 
Stevens, Miss Teresa Harcourt, 
Mrs. Pearl Quint, Miss Marie 
Corayer, Mary McGinty and Mrs. 
Jeannette Steinberg. 



3 Quincy Musicians To Perform 
With Youth Symphony Orchestra 



Three young musicians from 
Quincy will perform with the 

Greater Boston Youth 
Symphony Orchestra at opening 
ceremonies of the Music 



Educators National Conference 
at Hynes Auditorium in Boston 
Jan. 19 at 10 a.m. 

They are Joanne Ahola, 
violin; Jeffrey Dill, string bass; 
Mark Roseland, violin. 



The orchestra will perform 
Berlioz' Roman Carnival 

Overture and Respighi's Pines of 
Rome under the direction of 
conductor Walter Eisenberg. 



Airman Albert Healy At MacDill AFB 



Airman Albert J. Healy, son 
of Mr. and Mrs. James E. Healy 
of 22 Quarterdeck Rd, Quincy, 

has been assigned to MacDill 
AFB, Fla., after completing Air 
Force basic training. 



During his six weeks at the 
Air Training Command's 
Lackland AFB, Tex., he studied 
the Air Force mission, 
organization and customs and 
received special instruction in 
human relations. 



He has been assigned to a unit 
of the Tactical Air Command for 
further training and duty in the 

supply field. 

Airman Healy is a 1972 
graduate of Quincy High School. 




Michael Pcrito On Honor Roll 
At Proctor Academy 

Michael Perito, son of Mr. Quincy Shore Drive, Quincy, 

achieved Honor Roll status for 
the first trimester at Proctor 
Academy, Andover, N.H. To be 
named to the Honor Roll at the 
Academy, a student must attain 
an average of at least 80 in each 



and Mrs. Paul T. Perito of 1417 



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Quincy Rotary Club Sponsoring 
Overseas Study Awards Competition 



Thursday, January 18, 1973 Quincv Sua Page 9 



Competition for 
all-expenses-paid awards to 
American students enabling 
them to study overseas opens 
this month in the Rotary Club 
of Quincy. 

Candidates who live in 
Quincy or attend college in 
Quincy are invited to apply for a 
Rotary Foundation Graduate 
Fellowship, Undergraduate 
Fellowship, or Technical 
Training Award. 

Applications may be obtained 
from the secretary of the Rotary 
Foundation Committee, Joseph 
Whiteman, at Gordon & 
Whiteman, 1245 Hancock St., 
Quincy Center. 

Deadline for applications is 
March IS. 

Rotary Clubs in Southeastern 
Massachusetts and Rhode Island, 
District 795, last year gave two 
scholarships worth 
approximately $5,000 each for 
students to spend a year 
studying in a foreign land. There 
will be two more such awards in 
the district given this year. 

Rotary Foundation provides 

Samuel Evans 

Samuel E. Evans, noted 
South Shore muralist, will speak 
and demonstrate oil painting 
tonight [Thursday] at 8 p.m. for 
the Braintree Art Association in 
the Thayer Public Library in 
Braintree. 

One of Evans most notable 
works is the mural in the Quincy 
Savings Bank. He also painted 



educational and recreational 
study programs for qualified 
young people throughout the 
world. Objective of the 
voluntarily supported 
Foundation is to foster world 
understanding and friendship 
through people-to-people 
contact. 

Since 1947 more than 5,300 
young men and women have 
been selected and gone abroad at 
a cost of more than $13 million 
for a year of study and a tour as 
a goodwill ambassador. This year 
the Foundation will award 
approximately $2 million dollars 
to nearly 700 young people in 
scholarships for academic year 
1974-75. Graduate fellowships 
are awarded to young men and 
women for a year of graduate 
study in a country other than 
their own. They must be 20 
through 28 and have a bachelor's 
degree. The award covers all 
travel, living and educational 
expenses for one academic year. 

In addition to graduate 
fellowships and undergraduate 
scholarships, special programs 

To Address Braintree 

"The Birth of the Telephone", 
the mural that decorates the 



are available for young 
craftsmen through technical 
training awards and for young 
business and professional men 
through a group study exchange. 
Technical Training awards 
provide all travel, living and 
educational expenses for young 
artisa is and technicians to train 
in a country other than their 
own for a period of up to one 
year. It is available to men and 
women age 21 through 35. 

Group Study Exchange 
provides for teams of six young 
business or professional men age 
25 to 35 to spend a two month 
study period in a foreign 
country. 

In addition, 50 awards will be 
made for teachers of the 
handicapped throughout the 
world this year. This award is 
given to teachers [teaching 
physically, mentally or 
educationally handicapped ] to 
be full time students in another 
country while contributing to 
better understanding between 
the various countries. 




NORFOLK COUNTY'S newly elected Register of Probate, Paul C. 
Gay, is sworn in by Secretary of the Commonwealth John F. X. 
Davoren. Seated at right is J. John Fox, First Judge of Probate in 
Norfolk County. Gay took office Jan. 3, following ceremonies at the 
Probate Court which were attended by his family and friends. 

GOP Women To Meet Friday 



Art Association 

Boston offices of the 
England Telephone Co. 



New 



Mrs. Marion Andrews, 
director of senior citizens 
activities, will be the featured 

speaker at a meeting of the 
Women's Republican Club of 
Quincy Friday at 1:30 p.m. at 



the Wollaston Methodist Church. 

Hostesses for the meeting will 
be Mrs. Albert Nogler and Mrs. 
Norman Brigham, both of Ward 
6. 

Mrs. Philip G. Bourne is club 
president. 



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Page lOQuincy Sun Thursday, January 18, 1973 



Ouincy High-Voc. Tech NEWS 



Written by member! of *• Ouincy Hi(h School Journalism ClMI 



Open Letter To School Committee 

'Is It Fair To Deprive 2,400 Students 
Of a Valid Educational Experience?' 



Dear Sirs: 

As you are well aware, 
there is no Open Campus 
program of any kind at 
Quincy High School, 
presently. 

There is currently a 
proposal program which is a 
much watered down version 
of the original and which 
provides little educational 
advantage over and above a 
traditional school. 

What is difficult to 
understand is why the 
original program with minor 
changes was not adopted 
again. It is understandable 
that any changes which cost 
additional money would be 
prohibitive, but a full Open 
Campus program can be 
instituted with little or no 
expense. Granted it will not 
be perfect, but then again the 
traditional system is not 
perfect either. 

The best information we 
have indicates the following: 

•' The Quincy High School 
Administration is in favor of 
a full Open Campus program. 

• The majority of the 
faculty is in favor of a full 
Open Campus program, 
provided certain minor 
changes like a daily 
homeroom period are 
instituted. 

• The vast majority of 
students are in favor of the 
program. 

• The majority of parents 
are in favor of the program. 

• The community in 
general has been supportive. 



• Following Open Campus 
last year, the evaluative study 
for the State Department of 
Education, which you all 
have copies of, said that 
attendance was better for 
those on Open Campus than 
those not on Open Campus. 

• Those on Open Campus 
had less unsatisfactory 
conduct marks than those not 
on Open Campus. 

• Grades in English and 
Social Studies [the only 
subjects which all students 
take] were higher and there 
were less failures for those on 
Open Campus than those not 
on Open Campus. 

'• There was less drop-out 
potential for those on Open 
Campus than those not on 
Open Campus. 

• Studies in other 
communities indicate that 
vandalism and theft decreased 
sharply during Open Campus. 

In essence, statistical data 
showed Open Campus in 
Quincy to be a beneficial 
experience and that teachers, 
administrators, students, 
parents and the Community 
at large are supportive. This 
coupled with the fact that an 
educational system besides 
academic skills' is supposed to 
teach and provide for 
responsibility leads us to 
request that the Quincy 
School Committee grant a 
full Open Campus program. 

We understand that there 
are students who abused the 
privilege of Open Campus and 
that certain rules about 



"off-limits" areas were not 
adhered to by some. Is it fair, 
however, to deprive 2,400 
students a valid educational 
and life experience for what a 
small number did? 

The current proposal 
which would not allow 
students to manage their time 
for themselves, to buy a 
newspaper or a book in 
Quincy Square, to go to the 
Thomas Crane Library can 
hardly be labeled maximum 
education. 

All the resources of the 
community should be 
accessible, not just those 
from the Court House to the 
Southern Artery. 

We hope that you will at 
least respond to this letter, 
and better still, permit the 
institution of a valid and 
beneficial Open Campus 
program. 

Sincerely, 

Concerned Quincy High 

Students 

***• 

Accompanying this letter 
is a petition signed by over 
600 students and over 40 
members of the faculty and 
administration. The petitions 
said that the undersigned 
favored a full Open Campus 
program. 

in the case ot the faculty 
petition it spelled out certain 
requirements such as a daily 
homeroom; attendance 
sheets, no additional 
"policing" duties and street 
disciplinary action for those 
breaking Open Campus rules. 




BIOLOGY students at Quincy High School learn how to distinguish 
between various types of evergreens. Seated are Phyllis Morse and 
Mary Fantucchio. Standing are Robert McCauley, Robert Baron and 
Dan Jaffe. 

Biology Studies Topical 



By EMILY GOLDSTEIN 

The students in Q.H.S. 
biology classes are relating their 
studies to topical issues. 

For example, before the 
Christmas vacation, the Biology 
classes of Mrs. Jeanette 
Mohnkern, Miss Catherine 
Smith, Mr. Dana Smith and Miss 
Janet Kornmyer learned to 
distinguish between the various 
types of evergreen trees. 

Each student used a key to 



identify the trees. They 
answered questions, such as 
"which^ tree makes the best 
Christmas decoration, and why? 

Students also compared the 
cone size and shape of the 
various trees. 

As a supplement to individual 
study, mistletoe, holly and 
hemlock were displayed on a 
bulletin board in the room. 
Index cards explained where 
these traditions originated and 
how they evolved. 



How Do You Feel 
About New Electives? 



This Page Is A New Feature For Quincy Sun Readers. Articles Are Written by 
North Quincy Students and Quincy High Students On Alternating Weeks 



Students were asked their 
opinion of the new elective 
program in English and Social 
Studies. 

[Comments - English and 
History Electives} 

SCOTT CRITCHER: "I take 
Law and Social Responsibility 
and I think it is a good course 
and it should be a year-long 
course. I don't think students 
should get a loss of quality 
points "for electives". 



JANICE SILVER: "I think 
electives are more gratifying 
than regular classes". 

BILL FERRAZZI: "I take 
Satire and Nature of Comedy 
and think it is better than a 
regular English class." 

DEBBIE COHEN: "I think 
electives should be less than the 
semesters because the subject 
gets boring." 

DAVID KLEIMOLA: "I take 
Sports Lit and I like it." 




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Thursday. January 18. 1973 Ouincy Sun Page 1 1 



January 



By LISA COOPER 

In Quincy High School, 
seniors are required to have 
earned within the three high 
school years, at least 60 
"diploma" points, in order to 
graduate. 

For most students, this task is 
not extremely difficult, 
considering that in order to 
remain in school each is required 
to take at least three major 
subjects each year [i.e. English, 
Math, History) , and gym. 

These major subjects, which 
meet for 45 minutes, five days 
out of the "6-day cycle" are 
worth exactly five diploma 
points each. Thus, the below 
average student, taking the 
minimum required courses, 
earning 45 points for his majors 
and 4.5 diploma points for gym, 
will not graduate as he is short 
lOV* credits. 

An average QHS student 
takes four major subjects per 
year or three majors and one or 
two electives [i.e. Art, 
Photography, Shop] and gym, 
enabling him to fulfill his 60 
credit requirement. 

The above average student 



who is planning to pursue his 
education beyond high school, 
usually takes five or six majors 
per year sometimes earning his 
60 diploma points at the 
completion of his junior year. 
This student will graduate in 
June with the same status of 
having "satisfactorily completed 
the prescribed courses", as the 
average student. This leaves the 
student with one question; [isn't 
it worthless] why must he 
continue into his senior year 
considering he already has 
enough credits to graduate? A 
college bound student can be 
out working [possibly as an 
apprentice to a career or 
profession he wishes to pursue] 
to help pay for that college 
education. 

Quincy High does not 
graduate its seniors at the end of 
their junior year, or January of 
their senior year, but this can be 
done. A few other high schools 
throughout the state, provide 
seniors who are eligible [those 
who have fulfilled their 
requirements] with the option 
of graduation in January or 
June. 



Dance Jinx Ended! 



For many years QHVTS 
dances have been unsuccessful. 
y Over the past three years, 
there were four dances. Only 
one dance made any profit. Even 
at this dance, few students 
attended, and even fewer danced 
at all. Teachers who were willing 
to give up their free time to 
chaperone were hard to come 

by. 

But the Senior Class of '73 
was determined to have a good 
dance before we left QHVTS 
this May. We believed we could 
"change the bad image of 
QHVTS dances." 

On Saturday night, Jan. 6, 
Quincy's Senior Class sponsored 
their first dance of the year. 
Through the efforts of many 
seniors, along with the 
enthusiastic support of both 



Junior and Sophomore Classes, 
the dance was a success. Not 
only did the Senior Class make a 
sizable profit, but more 
importantly, everybody danced 
and enjoyed themselves. 

"Horizon" entertained all by 
playing many old Rock 'n Roll 
tunes, and also many current 
songs. 

Special thanks must also be 
given to many QHVTS teachers 
for their cooperation and 
assistance in helping to make the 
dance successful. 

We, the Senior Class of -'73 
are proud to say we'll be having 
more dances. We're confident 
that they will be even bigger and 
better than our first dance. 

Our next dance is scheduled 
for Saturday Feb. 3, at 8 p.m. 
We hope all will attend. 



Officials, Students Discuss 
North 9 s Accreditation 



By KEVIN FOLEY 

On Wednesday, Jan. 17, there 
will be a special meeting 
between the school committee 
and the student union. 

This is a bi-monthly meeting 
prescribed by state law. 

The meeting will be held in 



the Little Building at North 
Quincy High School. 

The major item of discussion 
will be the accreditation of 
North Quincy High School. 
North has only received a 
two-year accreditation, as 
compared to Quincy High's 
10-year accreditation. 




WOMEN HEAR BETTER 



Joking about it, a scientist told 
the-New York Times: "Husbands 
cannot seem to hear their wives 
speak, except for such phrases as 
'Dinner is ready*. And at night, 
wives can hear a dripping faucet 
that is inaudible to husbands." 

Seriously though, women do 
have a slight edge in hearing 
according to research at the 
University of Minnesota Hearing 
Research Laboratory. Studies 
showed that women's hearing is 
less affected than men's by 
low-frequency roaring and 
rumbling noise and is more 
sensitive to high-frequency 
sounds. 

One possible explanation is 



that boys and men are exposed to 
more noises • power mowers, auto 
engines, outboard motors, gunfire 
- and may suffer some hearing loss 
as time passes. Another possibility 
is that women have stronger 
middle-ear muscles than men. 

* ••' • 

This information has been 
brought to you as a public service 
by NABORHOOD PHARMACY, 
406 Hancock St., No. Quincy, 
where you can always count on 
friendly, professional service. 
Hospital equipment and supplies 
for rent or sale. Let us keep your 
prescription tax and insurance 
records. Phone: 773-6426. 




NEW OFFICE - Mayor Walter J. Hannon does the ribbon cutting honors at opening of the Quincy 
Center Business and Professional Association's new office at 1416 Hancock St. Looking on are Mark S. 
Bertman, association vice-president; Executive Director John E. Murray, Winthrop Sargent, IV, a 
member of the association's Advisory Board and Mrs. Winifred Goines, office secretary. 

Brownell Suggests Establishment 
Of Seawall Maintenance Program 



Rep. Thomas F. Brownell has 
recommended that Mayor 
Hannon establish a permanent 
program of seawall protection, 
maintenance and repair. 

In a letter to the Mayor, 
Brownell said the program 



should "set priorities for needed 
seawalls" and "engage in a 
regular surveillance, repair and 
maintenance of existing seawalls. 
"For too long, our City has 
taken a patchwork seawall 
approach to protecting valuable 



shore line from heavy flooding, 

high tides and erosion." he said. 

"It is my hope that you will 

make every effort to implement 
my suggestion as soon as 
possible." 



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Page 12 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 18, 1973 

Weia TWt of Oux/B<hja 

It. Rime!! IFiIIm 
Returns From Mediterranean 





Lt. (j.g.) Russell L.Willis Jr., 
son of Mrs. Russell L. Willis Sr., 
of 1 1 Alrick Rd, Quincy, has 
returned to his homeport at 
Newport, R.I., after a six-month 
deployment in the 
Mediterranean aboard the USS 
Joseph P. Kennedy Jr. 

His ship participated in 



various exercises with units of 
the British, French, Italian and 
Turkish navies. He visited the 
ports of Rota, Spain; Riposto, 
Sicily and Naples, Italy; 
Barcelona, Spain; Athens and 
Corfu, Greece; Izmir, Turkey; La 
Madalena, Sardinia and the 
famous Rock of Gibralter. 



Frederick Dunn Promoted 
To Marine Lance Cpl. 



Marine Lance Cpl. Frederick 
R. Dunn, son of Mrs. Louise G. 
Dunn of 447 Quincy Shore 
Drive, North Quincy, was 
promoted to his present rank 
while serving with the Marine 



Corps Base on Okinawa. 

A 1971 graduate of North 
Quincy High School, he joined 
the Marine Corps in August, 
1971. 



Stephen Hartford 
Promoted To Staff Sergeant 



Stephen R. Hartford, son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Myron D. Hartford 
of 38 Woodward Ave., Quincy, 
% has been promoted to staff 
sergeant in the U.S. Air Force at 
Memmingen, Germany. 

Sergeant Hartford is an 
administrative specialist at 
Memmingen AFB. He is assigned 
to the 7261st Munitions Support 
Squadron, a part of the Tactical 



Air Command which provides 
combat units for air support of 
U.S. ground forces. 

The sergeant, a 1966 graduate 
of Quincy High School, served 
12 months combat duty in 
Vietnam. 

His wife, Linda, is the 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Allen 
J. Fowler of Shelby, Mont. 




NAVY FIREMAN Recruit 
Stephen J. Hennessy, son of Mrs. 
E. Hennessy of 31 Littlef ield St., 
Quincy, has graduated from 
recruit training at the Naval 
Training Center in Great Lakes. 
He is a graduate of North 
Quincy High School. 

Steven Stentiford 

Airman Recruit Steven E. 
Stentiford, son of Mr. Edward 
A. Stentiford of 7 1 Brackett St., 
Quincy, has graduated from 



COAST GUARD Fireman 
Apprentice Paul F. O'Neil, son 
of Mr. and Mrs. B. E. McCourt 
of 17 Sea Ave., Houghs Neck, 
has graduated from basic 
training at the Coast Guard 
Training Center at Cape May, 
N.J. He is a 1971 graduate of 
Quincy High School. 

Navy Recruit Grad 

recruit training at the Naval 
Training Center in Great Lakes. 
He attended Quincy High 
School. 




Tli* Doorway To Protection 

For The Professional 
Concept In Insurance 

1 357 Hancock Street, Quincy 472-3000 




QUINCY CADETS CITED - Five Quincy cadets at the Massachusetts Maritime Academy, Buzzards Bay, 
were cited for "excellence and competence" by the U.S. Maritime Administration during service aboard 
the Academy training ship, "Bay State", during recent NATO exercises in the North Atlantic. Citations 
were presented by Capt. Thomas A. King of Washington, D.C., regional Director of the U.S.M.A. 
Receiving awards are Scott M. Gillespie, Gerard L. Gallinaro, Rob Roy MacGregor, William F. Vogel Jr., 
and Peter llacqua. 

Airman Lawrence Plant Assigned To Keesler 



Airman Lawrence E. Plant, 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Richard A. 
Plant of 22 Station St., has been 
assigned to Keesler AFB, Miss., 
after completing Air Force basic 
training. 

During his six weeks at the 

Arthur Giannotti 
In Pacific Training 

Marine Pfc. Arthur S. 
Giannotti, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Arthur J. Giannotti of 65 
Grafton St., Quincy Point, is a 
member of the Okinawa-based 
Battalion Landing Team 3/4 
conducting readiness training in 
the Pacific. 

Joseph Aldoupolis 
Recruit Graduate 

Seaman Recruit Joseph A. 
Aldoupolis, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Thomas J. Aldoupolis of 127 
South Walnut St., Quincy,' 
graduated from recruit training 
at the Naval Training Center in 
Great Lakes. 

Robert Nicholson 
At Quonsct Point 

Petty Officer Second Class 
Robert Q. Nicholson, husband 
of the former Miss Kathleen A. 
Morrill of 25 Arnold St., Quincy 
Point, has reported to Air 
Anti-Submarine Squadron 32 at 
the Naval Air Station, Quonset 
Point, R.I. 



Air Training Command's 
Lackland AFB, Tex., he studied 
the Air Force mission, 
organization and customs and 
received special instruction in 
human relations. 

He has been assigned to the 



Technical Training Center at 
Keesler for specialized training 
in the armament systems field. 



Airman Plant 
Quincy Vocational 
School. 



attended 
Technical 



David Walsh Promoted 
To Marine Corporal 



Marine Cpl. David L. Walsh, 
son of Mr. and Mrs. William 
Walsh of 43 Cross St., West 
Quincy, was promoted to his 
present rank while serving at the 
Marine Corps Base, Camp 



Lejeune, N.C. 

A former student of Quincy 
High School, he joined the 
Marine Corps in November 
1970. 



Airman Salvatore Venturelli 
Assigned To Lowry AFB 



Airman Salvatore L. 
Venturelli, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Louis S. Venturelli of 64 Cross 
St., West Quincy, has been 
assigned to Lowry AFB, Colo., 
after completing Air Force basic 
training. 

During his six weeks at the 
Air Training Command's 
Lackland AFB, Tex., he studied 



the Air Force mission, 
organization and customs and 
received special instruction in 
human relations. 

The airman has been assigned 
to the Technical Training Center 
at Lowry for specialized training 
in the armament systems field. 

Airman Venturelli is a 1972 
graduate of Quincy High School. 



James Cooley Promoted 
To Marine Lance Cpl. 



Marine Lance Cpl. James M. 
Cooley, sop of Mr. and Mrs. 
James F. Cooley, of 95 Alrick 
Rd, Quincy, was promoted to 
his present rank while serving 



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Send A Part Of 'Home 9 
To Your Man 
Or Woman 
In The Service. 




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with the aircraft carrier USS 
America in the Western Pacific. 

Robert Shaughnessy 
Promoted To Pfc. 

Marine Pfc. Robert M. 
Shaughnessy, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Albert Shaughnessy of 135 
Willard St., West Quincy, was 
promoted to his present rank 
while serving at the Marine 
Corps Base, Camp Lejeune, N.C. 



i Send A Year's Subscription Of ! 

i 



1 

Iffft* 

I 
I 
I 




Only $4.50 Call 471-3100 




15.9C.O.D. 

200 gats. $31 BO 

150 gals. $25.35100 gals. $17.90 

24 Hour Service Quality Fuels 

TONY'S OIL 337-2798 



Medicare 'Carry Over' Helps 1972, 1973 Deductible 



Thursday, January 18, 1973 Quincy Sun Page 13 



Under the "carry-over" rule 
of the medical insurance part of 
Medicare, doctor bills for 
October, November, and 
December may in some cases 
count toward the $50 annual 
deductible for both 1972 and 
1973, according to Frank 
Culkin, Social Security manager 
in Quincy. 

"The medical insurance part 




EDITOR 'S NOTE: Veterans and 
their families are asking 
thousands of questions 
concerning the benefits their 
Government provides for them 
through the Veterans 
Administration. Below are some 
representative queries. 
Additional information may be 
obtained at any VA office. 

Q - How long do I have to 
convert my National Service Life 
Insurance policy? 

A - NSLI five year term 
insurance can be converted at 
any time while in force. Term 
policies with numbers prefixed 
by "W" cannot be kept in force 
if they expire after the insured's 
50th birthday, and they must be 
converted before they expire. 

Q - An extra large dividend 
put me over the income limit 
this year. Will this cause my VA 
pension to be discontinued? 

A - No. As long as this 
income could not have been 
anticipated and was of a 
non-recurring nature, it will have 
no effect on your pension. 

Q - What shoukU do if my 
VA benefit check is not 
delivered on time? 

A - You should wait long 
enough for the mails to clear, 
then write the VA regional 
office which has your file. 
Include your name if you're a 
veteran, or the deceased 
veteran's name if it is a death 
claim, and your claim number. 
Do not write to the Treasury 
Department, as this will result in 
further delay. 

Q - A veteran's widow 
receiving pension died on June 
15 and had in her possession a 
VA check for the month of May. 
Is this check payable to anyone? 

A - The check must be 
returned to the disbursing office 
which issued it. It may then be 
paid, upon submission of a claim 
to the nearest VA office, to any 
children entitled to VA death 
benefits, or, if no eligible 
children, then to the person or 
persons who bore the expense of 
the last illness or burial. 



WOODWARD'S 

EXPERT 

FRONT END 

WORK 

AND 

ALIGNMENT 

1!1M»«fcC»ttliflmi 



TEIEMME: 773-iat 



of Medicare helps pay for doctor 
bills and a variety of other 
medical expenses of almost 
everyone 65 and over. Before 
payments from Medicare begin, 
the patient must meet the 
annual deductible-the first $50 
of covered medical expenses 
accumulated in a calendar year. 
"The carry-over rule helps the 
Medicare patient who might 
otherwise have to pay the $50 
deductible twice in a short 
period of time, Culkin said. 
"Once at the end of one year, 
again at the beginning of the 
next year. Under the carry-over 
rule, doctor bills for October, 
November and December which 
can be counted toward your $50 
deductible for 1972, can apply 



to the deductible for both 1972 
and 1973." 

Even if a Medicare patient 
hasn't met the 1972 deductible 
before October, he should send 
in all of his medical bills for 
covered services for the last 
three months of 1972, according 
to Culkin. 

"The 'carry-over' amount will 
be credited to your deductible 
for 1973," he said. 

The bills should be sent in 
with a Request for Medicare 
Payment form, available at most 
doctor's offices and all social 
security offices. They should be 
sent to Medicare, P. O. Box 
2194, Boston, Mass. 02106, the 
health insurance organization 
that handles medical insurance 



payments in the South Shore 
area. 

The medical insurance part of 
Medicare pays 80 percent of the 
reasonable charges for covered 
services after the deductible has 
been met. The program is 
funded by individual premiums 
matched by the Federal 
Government. 

The medical insurance 
supplements Medicare hospital 
insurance for people 65 and 
over, funded by social security 
contributions. Medicare is 
administered by the Social 
Security Administration of the 
U.S. Department of Health, 
Education and Welfare. 

The local office is at 1431 
Hancock St., Quincy. 



For Home 

Or Office 

Delivery 




CM 
471-3100 



AT NORFOLK- ANOTHER YEAR OF SOLID GROWTH... 
and progress in Assets means progress in Service 

Comparative Condensed Statement of Condition 

As of December 31, 1 972 

ASSETS 1972 1971 

Cash and due from Banks $ 38,578,299.88 $ 49,009,673.57 

U. S. Government Obligations 27,030,824.55 30,550,693.12 

State and Municipal Securities 67,409,947.10 73,826,534.64 

Other Bonds and Securities 895,050.00 736,050.00 

Federal Funds Sold 25,000,000.00 — 

Loans and Discounts 161,106,473.04 139,827,646.37 

Banking Premises, Furniture, Fixtures and Vaults . . 4,357,805.39 4,302,016.61 

Other Assets 2,462, 871.56 3,075,922.16 

TOTAL ASSETS $326,841,271 .52 $301,328,536.47 



LIABILITIES 

Deposits: 

Demand 

Savings and Other Time 

TOTAL DEPOSITS 

Unearned Income and Other Liabilities 

Reserve on Loans 

CAPITAL FUNDS 

Capital Stock 

Surplus 

Undivided Profits 

TOTAL CAPITAL FUNDS 

TOTAL LIABILITIES AND CAPITAL FUNDS 



$167,268,282.46 
124,417,740.97 

$291,686,023.43 
6,778,158.61 
2,644,443.80 



$156,760,888.40 
113,128,864.54 

$269,889,752.94 
5,244,085.43 
2,342,107.71 



$ 10,800,000.00 

12,235,000.00 

2,697,645.68 

$ 25,732,645.68 

$326,841,271.52 



$ 5,400,000.00 

12,235,000.00 

6,217,590.39 

$ 23,852,590.39 

$301,328,536.47 



Directors 



PHILIP D. BALCOM 

Chairman, Michigan Abrasive Company, Inc. 

FRED E. BERGFORS, JR. 

President, Quincy Oil Co. 

MATTHEW BROWN 

Partner, Brown, Rudnick, Freed and Gesmer 

GEORGE S. BURR 

Chairman, Instron Corporation 

ELMER O. CAPPERS 

Trustee 

DANA P. CARTER 

Director and Secretary, The William Carter Co. 

KENNETH F. CORCORAN 

Consultant 

DANA H. DANFORTH 

President, Danforth Associates, Inc. 

DOMINIC P. DiMAGGIO 

President, American Latex Fibre Corp. 

JOHN H. DRAPER, JR. * 

President, Draper Bros. Co. 



JOHN F. GRAHAM 

President 



BERNARD D. GROSSMAN 

Treasurer, Grossman Industrial Properties, Inc. 

GEORGE HOWLAND 

President, Minot, DeBlois & Maddison, Inc. 

JOHN W. KUNHARDT 

Executive Vice-President and Director, Hunneman & Co., Inc. 

DONALD J. MANN 

President, Buckley and Mann, Inc. 

JOHN S. MARSH 

Chairman of the Board 

HAROLD B. NASH 

Attorney-ai-Law 

FRANKLIN P. PARKER 

Trustee 

ROGER P. SONNABEND 

Chairman, Sonesta International Hotels 

JOSEPH P. TYRRELL 

Vice-President and Treasuret, Boston Edison Co. 



JAMES P. WINCHESTER 

Former Chairman of the Board 



Norfolk County Trust Company 

Serving the county since 1814 



MEMBER FOIC 



Page 14 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 18, 1973 



at Thomas Cran* Public Library 




Between 
the Covers 



According to most reports, 
there are very few white infants 
available for adoption, but 
Victoria Salkmann [pseud.] says 
THERE IS A CHILD FOR YOU. 
[Simon and Schuster. $6.50] 
This is a true story told with 
fictitious names of a middle class 
white family who adopt a black 
child. It is a very moving story 
of the conflicts and doubts that 
arose in the family and with 
friends and neighbors and of the 
endless obstacles the adoption 
agencies force one to hurdle. 

A blistering attack on the 
operation of our national 
intelligence system is made in 
Patrick McGarvey's CIA: The 
Myth and the Madness. 
[Saturday Review. $6.95] He is 
harsh in his appraisal but cites 
his reasons well with shocking 
examples of what he believes are 
their mistakes. Exciting reading! 

Life on a farm and with the 
neighbors in "Clabberville" in 
western Massachusetts is 
described with humor and 
touches of sadness by a young 
graduate school drop-ou, and 



ex-movement activist, Mark 
Kramer, who has been in hiding 
in an old farmstead for four 
years in MOTHER WALTER 
AND THE PIG TRAGEDY 
[Knopf. $5.95] Parts of this 
have appeared previously in the 
"Phoenix". 

Lovely color photographs and 
a brief text bring the Amish 
people to life with all the human 
qualities of contentment, 
companionship and happiness 
that underlie their belief in hard 
work and a simple life style in 
THE GENTLE PEOPLE: a 
Portrait of the Amish, by 
Donald M. Denlinger and James 
A. Warner [Grossman. $20.] 

The story of the 35 million 
people who left Europe to come 
to live in America is colorfully 
related by Philip Taylor in THE 
DISTANT MAGNET; European 
emigration to the U.S.A. 
[Harper. $14.] He explores their 
individual motives, expectations, 
backgrounds and difficulties as 
well 'as the general social trends 
which have come out of this 
mass movement. Excellent 
photographs spark the text. 



Ladies who can sew should 
reserve this book and get an 
early start on birthday and 
Christmas gifts for children. 
Wobbly Woo and Wobbly Winnie 
is a rag doll with unstuffed legs 
so it can sit easily and even have 
its legs crossed. It is a doll with 
two faces, Woo's on one side, 
Winnie's on the other. Then 
there are Dippy and Dilly 
Dolphin, Chicky Chick, Oliver 
Owl, all stuffed toys and Jock 
McThistle, a glove puppet. 
Simple directions for making 
them will be found in SOFT 
TOYS MADE EASY, by Brenda 
Morton [Taplinger. $6.95] 

For history and marine 
biology buffs THE COD, by 
Albert C. Jensen [Crowell. 
$7.95] is a highly interesting 
book. It covers the natural 
history of the cod and the 
methods used to capture it from 
Viking days to the modern 
hatcheries and doesn't overlook 
its impact on the social and 
economic history of New 
England and its place in lore and 
literature. No recipes! 



S.S. Women's Caucus 
To Hear TV Hostess Sunday 



"Women speaking openly and 
really listening to each other, 
encourage others to speak 
openly and to listen. This is the 
momentum that leads to 
responsible action." 

That is what South Shore 
women will be doing Sunday at 
2:30 p.m., at Fore River 
Clubhouse, Nevada Rd, Quincy 
Point. 

Martha Stuart, writer, 
producer and hostess of a 
national television program, will 
show her film, entitled 
"Women", which she produced 
in order to show women sharing 
experiences, thoughts, insights 
and feelings, and to work toward 



eliminating the handicap many 
women feel because of 
traditional perceptions of the 
female role. Following the film, 
she will lead a discussion and rap 
session. 

This program is being 
sponsored by the South Shore 
Women's Caucus, which was 
formed due to the response to 
"Quincy Women's Day", last 
October. 

"Women" is just the first in a 
series of programs designed to 
interest, and to help all women 
in the South Shore area. Future 
topics are: politics and 
legislation; education and 
employment counselling; 
education of young children - 



sex stereotyping in the schools; a 
new look at women's health 
services; and the new State 
Office of Child Care. 

' Many women have been made 
to feel that any man you really 
talk to is either your father, or 
your husband, or your lover, and 
pretty soon he's thinking, "Why 
in hell doesn't she ask me how I 
feel?" She simply replies, "Yes, 

it's all right to think about 
yourself; yes, it's all right to 
disagree and find out about 
things; yes, it's all right to make 
your life better and here are 
some ways that other women 
like you are doing just that". 



Homemaking, Health Aid Courses Being Offered 



Quincy women who have 
time on their hands and like to 
be helpful will soon have an 
opportunity to train to be 
ho:..; makers and home health 
aides. 

The courses are to be given in 
the mornings, Monday through 
Friday, beginning in late January 
or early February by the 
Home maker Services for the 
South Shore. 1359 Hancock St. 



The courses will include 
discussions of Care of the Sick 
Patient, Understanding the 
Individual, Working with People, 
Home Management, Safety in 



the Home, and Physical and 
Occupational Therapy. 

Those interested may call 
Miss Effie C. Waddell at 
773-1180. 



Yancy Hcndricth At Pearl Harbor 



Navy Petty Officer Third 
Class Yancey L. Hendrieth Jr., 

husband of Mrs. Cathy S. 
Hendrieth of 925 Hancock St., 



Quincy, has reported for duty at 
Pacific Fleet Headquarters, Pearl 
Harbor. 

He will be assigned to duties 
as a Yeoman Third Class. 



STATEMENT OF CONDITION 

COLONIAL FEDERAL SAVINGS 
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF QUINCY 

Wo lias ton, Massachusetts 
Close of Business December 31, J 972 
ASSETS LIABILITIES AND NET WORTH 



Mortgage Loans and Other 

Liens on Real Estate $29,386,803.57 



All Other Loans 

Real Estate Owned and 

in Judgment . 

Cash on Hand and In Banks. . . 

Investments and Securities. . . 

Fixed Assets Less 

Depreciation 

Deferred Charges and 

Other Assets 

TOTAL ASSETS 



441,277.21 

30,721.99 

322,896.83 

3,336,350.20 

165,529.43 

186,072.31 
$33,869,651.54 



Savings Accounts $20,604,251.20 

Advances From Federal 

Home Loan Bank . 50,000.00 

Other Borrowed Money 338,200.00 

Loans in Process 131,433.09 

Other Liabilities 593,923.00 

Specific Reserves 41,011.55 

General Reserves. .$1,553,053.53 



Surplus 557,779.17 2,110,832.70 

TOTAL LIABILITIES $33,869,651.54 




LAST SURVIVOR of Spanish War veterans in Quincy, John 
Houston, 92, of 21 Clive St., North Quincy, gets a Christmas basket 
of goodies from Mrs. Jean Coughlin of Quincy, past commander of 
the George J. Whitten Auxiliary of the United Spanish War Veterans. 
Houston, who makes his home with his wife and his daughter-in-law, 
Mrs. John Houston Jr., is commander of the William Boyd Camp of 
the USWV. Mrs. Coughlin's mother, Mrs. Frances M. Town, who 
died Dec. 6, was the last charter member of the Whitten Auxiliary. 

Norfolk County Hospital 
Gets Full Accreditation 



The Norfolk County Hospital 
has received full accreditation 
for the next two years from the 
Joint Commission on 
Accreditation of Hospitals, 
based in Chicago. 

County Commissioner George 



B. McDonald of Quincy said the 
joint commission 'commended 
the hospital for "maintaining 
standards deserving of 
accreditation [and] for your 
constant effort to improve 
quality of patient care." 



Cynthia Freedman On Dean's List At Burdette 



Miss Cynthia Ri Freedman, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Hyman 
Freedman of 152 Barham Ave., 
North Quincy, has been cited for 
outstanding secretarial 
procedures, and named to the 
Deans List with highest honors 



at Burdett College, Boston. 

She is a graduate of North 
Quincy High School. Before 
entering Burdett she took a test 
and won a $500 Scholarship. 
Her marks were A's and honors 
in her first quarter. 



CROSSWORD PUZZLE 1 



ACROSS 

1. Oriental 

nursemaid 
5. Bind 

10. Conceal 

11. Actress, 

PrenUss 

12. So be it 

13. Preserved 
in brine 

14. Laughing 
uncon- 
trollably 
<2wds.) 

16. United 

17. Of a great 
Peruvian 
empire 

21. In addition 
25. Kind of lace 

27. Require- 
ment 

28. Do a 
musical 
encore 

29. 

Farrow 

30. Popular 
comedian- 
actor 
(2wds.) 

37. Too much 

38. Reprehen- 
sible 

40. Misrepre- 
sent 

41. Over again 

42. Hostile 
nation 

43. Take on 
cargo 

DOWN 

1. Surpriser's 
interjection 

2. Miss 

Benxell 



3. Seaport 
in South 
Yemen 

4. Biddies 

5. Freshet 

6. Soft 
mineral 

7. 0.T. book 

8. Toward 
shelter 

9. Cushions 
13. Whole- 

hearted- 
ness 
15. Labor 

17. Way- 
farer's 
stop- 
over 

18. Born 
(Fr.) 



19. Fairly 
good 
grade 

20. Say 
further 

21. Soft 
drink 

22. Dia- 
mond 
girl 

"Faerie 
Queene" 
lady 
Pen 



Today's Answer 



23 




13 



M i 1 1 
aBTi u|3,a; 

3'HlR 



24 
26 

29 



30 
31 



bog 
Natur- 
ally 

hornless 
Garment 
Level 



32. Cross out 

33. Part of a 
sombrero 

34. Elliptical 

35. Songstress, 
Simone 

36. Toboggan 
39. Female 

sheep 




ERIC H. JOHNSON, M.D. 

of 

EYE HEALTH SERVICES, INC. 

Announces The Opening of His 

Office at 

1050 HANCOCK STREET, QUINCY 

for the practice of ophthalmology 

January 1973 

Office Hours by Appointment 
Telephone (617)471-4250 



HHHHMfi 






John B. Powers Appointed 
Quincy Sun Advertising 



Thursday, January 18, 1973 Quincy Sun Page 15 




Publisher Henry W. Bosworth 
today announced the 
appointment of John B. Powers 
as advertising director of the 
Quincy Sun and assistant to the 
publisher. 

Powers, a Quincy resident, 
has been New England sales 
representative for Fairchild 
Publications since 1966. Prior to 
that he was a member of the 
retail sales staffs of The Patriot 
Ledger and the Boston Herald 
Traveler. 

For the past 15 years he has 
also been Advertising Manager 
for Colman's Sporting Goods 
Store. 

A 1957 graduate of Quincy 
High School he joined The 
Patriot Ledger as an office boy 
Sept. 13 of that year. He was 
appointed to the retail sales staff 
in June, 1959. 

In August, 1964 he went to 
the retail sales department of the 
Boston Herald Traveler. 




JOHN B. POWERS 

In March, 1966 he joined 
Fairchild Publications serving as 
New England sales representative 
for Fairchild's men's fashion and 
textile publication the Daily 
News Record. His sales territory 
included New York City and 
sections of Ohio and 
Pennsylvania. 



"We are happy to have Jack 
join the Quincy Sun," Bosworth 
said. "His 16 years of experience 
in retail sales and his knowledge 
of the Quincy area will help us 
to better serve the Quincy 
business area. 

"He will also play a major 
role in The Sun's plans for 
future growth and expansion as 
we strive to make this the best 
possible weekly and community 
oriented newspaper." 

Powers is a past president of 
the Houghs Neck Community 
Council and presently a member 
of its Executive Board. He has 
been associated with the 
council's monthly publication, 
The Bulletin, as advertising 
manager since 1968. 

He is married to the former 
Carol A. Spadorcia of Quincy. 
The couple have four children, 
John, 14, Kathleen, 12, Debra, 
1 1 and Nancy 4. They live at 99 
Lenox St., Quincy. 



Business News 



William O'Malley Elected 
Hancock Bank V.P. 



William F. O'Malley of 
Hanover, long active in Quincy 
charitable affairs, has been 
elected vice president of the 
Hancock Bank and Trust Co. 

O'Malley, a graduate of 
Boston College and Williams 
School of Banking, is treasurer 
of the Quincy March of Dimes, 
the Quincy Heart Fund and the 
Special Gifts Committee of the 
Quincy United Fund. 

Named assistant treasurers at 
Hancock were Kenneth D. 
Gibbons of Duxbury, Alice L. 
Wiklund of Braintree, Bruce D. 
Sutcliffe of Canton, and Daniel 
L. Mclntyre of South 
Weymouth. 




WILLIAM F. O'MALLEY 



John Fol 
Hancock 



an Receives $150 
Suggestion Award 



Paul Ffynn, Jr. A$$t. Vice-fret. 



John F. Folan of 103 Cliff 
St., Quincy, received a $150 
award through the suggestion 
system at John Hancock Mutual 
Life Insurance Co. 

A member of the policy 
control services department, 
Folan suggested the conversion 



of a manual operation to a 
mechanical process which 
improved accuracy and reduced 
costs. 

Suggestion awards are given 
to employees who define 
problems which exist in their 
departments and propose 



workable solutions to those 
problems. 

Since the start of the program 
nearly 23 years ago, some 7,350 
awards have been granted 
totaling $218,428. 

During 1972, 340 employees 
were awarded $15,635. 



Paul T. Flynn Jr. of Quincy 
was recently elected Assistant 
Vice-President of the Provident 
Institution for Savings. 
Announcement was made by 
John S. Howe, President of the 
bank. 

A graduate of Boston College, 
Northeastern University 
Graduate School, and the 



Savings Bank Association School 
for Supervisory Personnel, he 
also attended the Graduate 
School of Savings Banking at 
Brown University. 

Mr. Flynn joined the 
Provident in 1955 as a clerk. 
Prior to his latest promotion he 
had been Loan Service Officer 
and Assistant Treasurer. 



S. S. National Makes Four 
Management Appointments 





South Shore National Bank 
of Quincy announces four major 
management appointments - one 
senior loan officer and three vice 
presidents. 

Michael D. Holmes of 
Dedham, a vice president in the 
commercial loan department, 
was named senior loan officer. 

Appointed 4o vice president 
are: Paul M. Fasulo of Scituate, 
who is in charge of the 
Accounting and Finance 



Department; Charles P. Reidy 
Jr., of Abington, who directs 
operations in the Installment 
Loan Department; and George 
W. Rugman of Hanover, who 
heads the Commercial Mortgage 
Department. All are employed in 
the bank's headquarters in 
Quincy. 

South Shore National Bank 
has 34 branch offices in Norfolk 
County and lists assets in excess 
of $210 million. 



Rent a 1973 

Buick 



f?^L 



eono Car 



Hancock Bank Net Operating 
Earnings Up 27% 



Hancock Bank reports net 
operating earnings for 1972 at 
$896,384.06 contrasted with 
$705,934.84 a year ago, up 27 
per cent, according to William E. 
Kelley, president. 

Deposits at year end had risen 
to $70,5 39,845.54 up from 
$66,198,523.10 in 1971, an 
increase of $4,341,322.44. 

Total assets for 1972 rose to 
$78,431,012.39 an increase of 
$5,140,294.83 over a year ago. 

Kelley said that earnings per 
common share before security 



transactions and other 
extraordinary items were $3.20 
compared to 1971 per share 
earnings of $2.52, an increase of 
68 cents per share. 

Hancock Bank maintains 14 
banking offices throughout 
Norfolk County. 



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■ ' ■ ■ 



Page 16Quincy Sun Thursday, January 18, 1973 



Unedited selections from the writings of Quincy s elementery school children 





WINTER 

Snow is here, 
Snow is there, 
Snow is everywhere! 
People are here, 
People are there, 
People are everywhere! 
We have fun here, 
We have fun there, 
We have fun everywhere! 

Cathy Deane 

Myles Standish School 

Grade 5 



SNOW 

Snow is white 
It is a beautiful sight 
If you are a boy 
You will throw it 
Around on the ground. 
But if you are a girl 
You will build fairy tale 
castles in the snow. 

Angela Fletcher 

Myles Standish School 

Grade 4 



THE SNOW CAME 
TUMBLING DOWN 

The snow came tumbling 
down, 

All the way to the ground. 

It was piled so high, 

It almost reached the dark 

gray sky. 

Joey Feeney 

Squantum School 

Grade 5 

BLINK! BLINK! 

How would you like to be a 
traffic light? It's fun sometimes. 
You think it's safe. Well, it's 
not! I'll tell you a story about 
me. One cold night I was making 
my lights go from red to yellow 
to greem. 1 thought it was fun, 
but the street was slippery. 
People would not pay any 
attention to me and did not see 
me and bumped me. 

What a life! 

Frank Maldro 

Squantum School 

Grade 6 

WELCOME WINTER 

Welcome winter your so 
bright. With your cold breeze so 
very light. You can freeze the 
lake to ice. We like winter 
because its nice. 

Stephen McCormack 

Squantum School 

Grade 6 



TH C . GRINCH WHO STOLE 
CHRISTMAS 
The Grinch was not like other 
people. He had a funny itch to 
steal - especilly on Christmas. All 
of a sudden he tought of a plan 
to steal Christmas. He said, "I 
will dress up like Santa Claus 
and make my dog a reideer he 
laft that night. A little girl came 
out and said, "What are you 
doing Santa? Santa said, "I am 
taking your Christmas and your 
toys to get fixed. Now go to and 
he gave the little who girl a drink 
of water. Then the Grinch did 
the rest of the houses. Then the 
Grinch was going to dump them 
over a clift but his heart bening 
to grow and grow. Then he 
brought all the toys bake to the 
little who boys and girls. 

Linda Wencek 

Atherton Hough School 

Grade 4 



SNOWFLAKES 

I like snowflakes. They come 
down so fast they tickle my 
face. After they are all over the 
place I slide on my sled. It is so 
much fun I hate to go to bed. 

Keith Hagar 

Myles Standish School 

Grade 4 




SNOWMAN THOUGHTS 

Snowman thoughts are on my 
mind, 

And I like to dream and 
dream. 

Every snowman that I find, 
My snowman thoughts burst 
and beam. 

Kim Kowilcik 

Squantum School 

Grade 6 



IF I WAS A 
SNOW SHOVEL 

If I was a snow shovel, I 
would feel lonely sometimes. I 
would only feel needed when 
my owners used me. When my 
owners used me, I would be 
happy because on ice it feels like 
a back massage. Then during the 
summer I am left in the attic 
sweating. Again, after a long 
spring and summer, it's fall again 
and I get to be used. 

Barry Randall 

Squantum School 

Grade 6 

SUNRISE 

The morning sun has come 
And the beautiful day has 
begun, 

I love the morning sun, 
That is one of the beautiful 
things 

God had done. 

Dianne Burrows 

Squantum School 

Grade 6 



NOT SO PRETTY 

The snow is dirty and brown 
and very slushy on the ground. 
When it's newly fallen it's not 
this way. But after a while it 
turns very gray. 

Nancy Shea 

Squantum School 

Grade 6 



ON CHRISTMAS EVE 

On Christmas Eve when all 
was quiet, I heard the sound of 
sleigh bells. I knew it was Santa. 
I could not believe what I saw! 
It was a jolly old fellow covered 
with soot. He went right to his 
work. When he was done he 
went right on his way. And I 
heard him say marry chrismas 
and a happy new year! 

Kathleen Anastasio 

Atherton Hough School 

Grade 4 



SNOW 

Soft snowflakes are white 
Snow is a glorious sight 
Soft cuddly coats 
And Slushy moats 
The ground is white and the 
sky is blue 

Snow is like a dream coming 
true. 

Deralla Hart 

Myles Standish School 

Grade 6 

WINTER 

Winter is the snowflakes 
falling from the sky, 

Winter is when snowflakes 
come tinkling in your eye 

Winter is the sand truck 
coming down the street 

Winter is when you see icy 
snow and sleet 

Winter is when Jack Frost 
makes you very cold 

Winter is when Jack Frost is 
very bold 

Winter is when evergreens 
turn all white 

I think winter is a beautiful 
site 

Winter is when children are 
waddling all around 

Winter is when snowflakes are 
all over the ground 

I think winter is a nice time 
of year 

It brings happy feelings and 
lots of good cheer. 

Laurel Bumpus 

Squantum School 

Grade 6 



SNOWY OUT 

It's so snowie out 
It's so snowie out on 
Christmas day 

It fills my heart with 
Christmas gay 

When I look up at the sky 

I hope Santa Claus will go by. 

Kathy Megnia 

Snug Harbor School 

Grade 3 




A PEACEFUL WALK 

Along the peaceful trail I 
walk 

With a deep arid quiet feeling. 
I look around me at the 
crystal clear snow so bright, 

And at the green trees with 
clumps of white. 

But most of all it's to walk 
amid the pretty sight 

And to keep on walking until 
night. 

Beverly Josselyn 

• Squantum School 

Grade 6 




THE STORY ABOUT BOBBY ORR 

Bobby Orr grew up in Canada 
and he had one sister and a 
brother. When he was nine years 
old he joined pee wee hockey 
team and won the most Best 
players award. The Boston 
Bruins saw him when he was 
nine years old and they wanted 
to put him on the Boston Bruins 
when he was older. When he 
joined the Bruins they won the 
Stanly Cup. Johnny Busic asked 
Bobby if he wanted to sign a five 
year contract and he did. 

John Baylis 

Atherton Hough School 

Grade 4 

SUGAR , 

The great hills of snow, 
Are hidden by the trees. 
They look like mounds of 
sugar, 

As I ride over on my skiis. 

Nancy Shea 

Squantum School 

Grade 6 



THE JOLLY ELF 

Once there was a jolly old elf 

I wish he was real. It would be 

nice to have his nice warm beard 

rubbing against my face. He 

would be mine and wherever I 

go he would go. I would name 

him Elfie. I would bring him to 

bed with me and give him candy 

canes. I would talk to him a lot 

too. How much fun it would be 

if he was only real, but he's not. 

Ruth Doherty 

Squantum School 

Grade 6 



THE MAN NAMED 
VINCE LUMBADIE 

Lumbadie was a coach for the 

Greenbay Packers, led to the 

Superbowl wining every game 

for Greenbay. When they played 

in the Superbowl Greenbay beat 

the Kansas cheifs 37 to 0. A 

couple of years ago Lumbadie 

got very sick and died of cancer. 

Michael Abboud 

Atherton Hough School 

Grade 4 

SNOW 

All snow is very white 

All clean and all very bright. 

The sun is glistening on the 

snow, 

And people are walking nice 

and slow. 

Shadows cast upon the day, 
This sometimes lasts until the 

month of May. 



SNOOPY AND THE RED BARON MY FAVORITE CHRISTMAS 



One Christmas Eve the Red 
Baron was out in his plane 
hunting for our hero, Snoopy. 
Wile he was out hunting Snoopy 
was called by Santa his best 
frend. Santa said that the Red 
Baron was outside his house 
waiting for him. Snoopy put on 
his mask and got on his dog 
house and started in the air. 
Meanwile the Red Baron pushed 
open the door and said, Your 
coming with me! He took Santa 
with him, and just as they steped 
out of the door, snow feel down 
from the roof of the hot se. they 
looked up it was Snoopy. 
Snoopy jumped down on the 
Red Baron and tied him in a 
knot. Santa thanked Snoopy by 
giving him the best gift of all a 
red nosed rain deer named 
rudph. 

Michael Lorenzetti 

Atherton Hough School 

Grade 4 



The night befor Christmas in 
my house I could hear the elevs 
stacking up all the presents. 
Everyone was asleep but I was 
awake. It was twelve o'clock 
three hours later I went down 
stairs and I saw all my presents. 
Then I went into my mothers 
and fathers room and woke 
them up. Then I woke up my 
sisters and brother we opened up 
our presents and played with 
them. At nine o'clock we went 
to church to pray because it was 
Jesus' birthday. On the next day 
my sisters and brother took me 
sleding with the new taboggans 
we got. Then my mother and 
father took all of us skiing and 
we had fun all week thear. Win 
we got home we played with our 
presents and had fun with our 
gifts. 

Peggy Morrell 

Atherton Hough School 

Grade 4 



Joy and happiness is in the 



air, 



As the people walk in pairs. 

The big slim trees cater to the 

Cold winter breeze. 

Winter is here and there, 

But will soon be everywhere. 

Jean Duddy 

Squantum School 

Grade 6 

WINTER 

Winter is very cold. 
Snow and wind is very bold. 
In the winter I feel the same. 
I'm glad that winter came. 

Lori Ryan 

Squantum School 

Grade 5 




A GREAT SURPRISE 

I woke up one morning to my 
surprise, 

I looked out the window, 
then to the sky. 

The snow was falling from up 
so high, 

When it landed the ground 
turned white. 

It looked so beautiful, 
Morning, noon, and night. 

Richie Adams 

Myles Standish School 

Grade 6 

QUINCY POST OFFICE 

I liked it when the letter was 

canceled and I liked the mail 

boxes. I have never been inside 

the post office where the men 

work. It is a nice place. I like it. 

Edyth Benedict 

Wollaston School 

Grade 2 

WOLLASTON POST OFFICE 

I like the post office. I like 
when they sorted the mail. I like 
when they cancelled it. 

Betty McKenna 

Wollaston School 

Grade 2 

PURCHASING AGENT 

A man who buys materials 
for a company, school or other 
large group. He must look for 
good material that doesn't cost 
too much. 

Kathy McNamara 

Wollaston School 

Grade 2 



-money talks- 



How to Become Wealthy — 5 

"You Can Develop a 
New Personality" 



By Philip J. 



COLONIAL FEDERAL SAVINGS 
And Loan AsMciation 
of Quincy and Hofceoofc 

•-« WMfcdcys ».7,)0 Thursday* 




Thursday, January 18, 1973 Quincy Sun Page 17 



Authors of self improve- 
ment books emphasize that 
complete changes of person- 
ality and character are possi- 
ble by an act of will. If to be 
successful a person must have 
certain attributes, it is reason- 
able to suggest that he do 
what he can to acquire or 
strengthen them. 

Can a person really do 
something about his personal 
deficiencies? Can a person in 
poor health, for example, do 
anything to acquire physical 
vigor ? 

William Danforth, founder 
of the Ralston Purina Com- 
pany and the Danforth Foun- 
dation, gives an affirmative 
answer as he tells of his early 
childhood, when he lived, sal- 
low-cheeked, and hollow- 
chested, in malaria-infested 
swamp lands. One day his 
teacher challenged him: "I 
dare you to be the healthiest 
boy in the class." It was 
enough to trigger Danforth 
into a new outlook concerning 
his health and how to achieve 
it. The result was that through- 
out his long life he never lost 
any time because of sickness. 

Danforth admits that his 
associates in later years 
thought him to be a health 
faddist because he preached 
temperance, regular exercise, 
moderate diet, adequate rest, 
and good posture. His success 
formula is a square with sides 
marked Mental ("Think 
Tall" ), Social ("Smile Tall" ), 
Religious ("Live Tall"), and 
Physical ("Stand Tall"). 

Danforth maintained that 
he could detect a person's 
total psychology by his walk 
and posture. An interesting 
experiment is to try the Dan- 
forth square on yourself; an 
almost immediate psychologi- 
cal lift is experienced as you 



walk erect, smiling, and con- 
fident toward the day's chal- 
lenges. 

"Inspirational books are 
tremendously instrumental in 
changing lives," observes 
wealthy business executive W. 
Clement Stone, "and there is 
no book with more inspiration 
and motivation than the 
Bible." 

He firmly believes in the 
validity of the Biblical ad- 
monition that "what things 
soever you desire, when you 
pray, believe that you receive 
them and you shall have 
them." 

"It has helped countless 
thousands to develop physical, 
mental, and moral health," 
says Stone. He cites the case 
of John D. Rockefeller, who 
had to retire at age 57 because 
of ill health but lived to the 
ripe age of 97 through a posi- 
tive mental attitude and 
wholesome living. 

Good health is an impor- 
tant requisite for the demands 
of new life goals, the self- 
helpers insist. They rule out 
intemperance in drinking, eat- 
ing, and smoking in an over- 
all program of self-develop- 
ment. Proper hygiene habits 
must be observed. Periodic 
medical checkups are in order. 

A sense of getting some- 
where, of using present rou- 
tine chores as stepping stones 
to better things, can work 
wonders with one's outlook 
toward life and attitude 
toward others. A genuine in- 
terest in people, their prob- 
lems and anxieties, and an 
effort to be helpful can deep- 
en the sense of making one's 
life worthwhile. Participation 
in community or public serv- 
ice activities will enrich the 
personality and add to work- 
ing experience and capacity. 



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KATHARINE ROSS 



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WOLLASTON 



11 Youths Receive 
Academy Alternate Appointments 



Eleven Quincy boys have 
been given alternate 
appointments to the three 
service academies, announces U. 
S. Rep. James A. Burke 
[D-Milton]. 

Another Quincy youth, 
Christopher J. DeLappe of 66 
Henry St., North Quincy, was 
nominated by Burke to compete 
for one of the eight slots 
available to Massachusetts at the 
Merchant Marine Academy at 
Kings Point, N.Y. 

Given alternate appointments 
to the Air Force Academy at 
Colorado Springs, Colo., were 
Robert G. McCormick of 103 
Faxon Rd, North Quincy; Kevin 
E. Murphy of 55 Florence St., 
Wollaston and Donald P. 
Silverstein of 399 Adams St., 
Quincy. 

Given alternated 
appointments to the Naval 
Academy at Annapolis, Md., 
were Thomas F. Keeley of 4 
George Rd, and Paul F. Mullen 
of 305 Edge Hill Rd, both of 
Quincy. 

Alternate appointments to 
the Military Academy at West 
Point, N.Y., went to Jeffrey N. 
Aristide of 156 Brook Rd, and 
Louis P. Malvesti of 152 Centre 
St., both Quincy; Stephen N. 
Clark of 51 Waterston Ave., and 
Kenneth G. Shine of 1 9 Prospect 
Ave., both Wollaston; and Walter 
W. Collins of 316 Atlantic St., 
and Robert C. Newcomb Jr. of 
54 South Bayfield Rd, both 
North Quincy. 

The alternates are in line for 
appointment to the academies if 
the principal appointees - one to 
the Air Force Academy, two to 
the Naval Academy and four to 
the Military Academy - fail or 
refuse the appointment. 

Gallivan 

Completes 

Training 

Chief Petty Officer George J. 
Gallivan, son of Mrs. George J. 
Gallivan of 1 1 Hodges Ave., 
North Quincy, has completed 
28-days reserve combat readiness 
training with Patrol Squadron 92 
at the Naval Air Station, 
Jacksonville, Fla. 



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Okla., and William Hahn of Highland Ave., Wollaston, chat at 
Fashion Show Media. Preview and awards presentation at Boston 
City Hall. Event was a preview of fashion show to be held Jan 23 at 
Sheraton Boston Hotel. 



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rni 



Page 18 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 18, 1973 



In Basketball 



Nolan Wins 100th; Quincy Hit By Injuries 



North Quincy Basketball 
Coach Bob Nolan last week 
gained the 100th victory of -his 
career and was presented the ball 
to put in his showcase. 

Delighted as he was to reach 
this milestone, Nolan is 
concentrating on the second half 
of the season as his Raiders, 
losing three of their last four 
games, are in danger of not 
qualifying for the. state 
tournament. 

North, 17-0 in regular season 
play a year ago, went to the 
South's Division 1 finals last 
year before being eliminated 
from the state tourney by 
Catholic Memorial. North's final 
record was 20-1. 

The Raiders started out this 
year as if they were going to roll 
to another Greater Boston 
League title or close to it but 
going into Friday night's game at 
Medford they are 4-3 [3-3 in the 
league] and must win eight of 
their remaining 10 games to 
make the tournament. 

Tuesday North will play at 
Chelsea. 

Meanwhile, Quincy, hit hard 
by injuries and further hampered 
last week by illness, hoped to 
even its GBL record at 3-3 
Tuesday at Medford. The 
Presidents, 2-5 overall, will host 
Everett Friday and entertain 
Maiden Tuesday. 

North" lost to Revere for the 
first time in 10 years last Friday, 
52-48, at Boston Garden in a 
preliminary to the 
Celtics-Atlanta game. North has 
an 18-1 edge over the years 
between the two rivals. 

North led, 20-19, at the half 
but fell apart in the second half 



despite a 20-point performance 
by Jamie Doherty. 

"It had to end some time," 
Nolan said. "They just 
outplayed us in every respect, 
out-rebounding and outrunning 
us. Our offense was very flat. 
This was the first time this year 
we scored less than 50 points 
and it seems every time we go 
under 60 we lose. We shot 
poorly." 

Tire Garden has been a 
graveyard for several years for 
North, which finally shook the 
long jinx last year when it won 
two state tourney games there. 

Earlier in the week North had 
pounded Quincy, 70-35, in what 
was probably its best all-around 
performance of the season. 

Although thrilled by his 
100th win, Nolan admittedly 
was embarrassed by the huge 
score and, although Quincy 
Coach Marty Finnegan refused 
to use the absence of three 
starters, all on crutches, as an 
excuse, Nolan mentioned them 
and told Finnegan he was sorry 
about the final margin. 

"That was a tremendous 
display of high school 
basketball, both offensively and 
defensively," Finnegan said in 
praising the Raiders. 

At halftime North led, 27-14, 
and took a huge 48-18 bulge 
into the final period. Nolan 
cleared his bench but North still 
added to its margin. 

Doherty had 18 points, Ken 
Marsters 14 and Bob Morton 10 
for North, while John 
Reggiannini had 18 for Quincy. 

Ed Millers's North junior 
varsity nipped Quincy, coached 
by Joe Amorosino, North's 



jayvee coach the last four years, 
4744, in overtime after trailing, 
32-26, at the end of three 
periods. 

Friday, with Finnegan home 
ill, Amorosino took over the 
Quincy varsity reins for the first 
time and, using an effective 
freeze, just missed upsetting 
Somerville, which pulled out a 
3 2-31 win as a last second 
Quincy shot just missed. 

The Presidents were really 
hurting for this game. In 
addition to the loss of Mike 
Marvelle, Bill Kiggen and Jim 



McKinnon due to injuries, 
Reggiannini and Ken Furfari, 
their offensive leaders, had 
missed practice because of the 
flu and Phil Iovanna was still 
groggy as an aftermath of the 
same ailment. 

"I'm so proud of these boys 
because they showed such 
self-discipline and patience and a 
lot of courage in following my 
directions and playing the game 
I wanted," Amorosino said. 
"And I'm sure Marty will feel 
the same way. 



'He and I had talked about a 
possible slow-down during the 
day and I decided to use the 
freeze when I saw how sick some 
of our players were. 

"I was very proud of the way 
the boys kept coming back from 
five and six-point deficits. And it 
was great the way they played 
after that crushing loss to North 
Quincy." 

With the scoring naturally 
limited due to the freeze, 
Reggianni was high man for 
Quincy with nine points and 
Ray Papile had seven. 



Magnarelli Paces Little Loop 



Local 513 swept to a 4-0 
victory over the Brett Club 
Saturday to maintain its seven 
point lead atop the Quincy 
Bowling Little Loop. The Local 
bowlers are now undefeated in 
their last 1 2 strings. 

Dick Magnarelli, the Local 
513 captain, rolled the weekly 
high individual three with a 
pinfall of 313 to take over the 
individual scoring lead by a 
margin of 00.6 over Frank 
Miceli. Magnarelli's average is 
now 100.8. 

Tony Alessi's high individual 
single of 132 and his 310 for 
three strings kept the Quincy 



Elks in second place over the 
Burke Club. Davis Club got the 
high team three [1,330] and 
high team single [489] to hold 
fourth place. 

The standings: 

Local 513,38-10 
Quincy Elks, 31-17 
Burke Club, 30-18 
Davis Club, 29-19 
Wollaston Bowladrome, 
27-21 

Hutchinson Oil, 26-22 
Montclair Men's Club, 26-22 
Bryan Post, 25-23 
Brett Club, 23-25 



Atlantic Fuel, 22-26 
Hennessey Plumbing, 
Mclntyre Club, 15-33 
Local 1451, 14-34 
Morrissey Club, 13-35 

The Top Ten: 

Dick Magnarelli, 100.8 
Frank Miceli, 100.2 
Frank Granara, 99.19 
Steve Martinelli, 96.11 
Pat Connolly, 96.8 
Mike Durkin, 95.8 
Bruce Perry, 93.24 
Mike Regan, 93.16 
Dan Finn, 92.8 
Tony Alessi, 91.35 



19-29 



Trubiano Receives Two Awards At Rochester 



Lou Trubiano, a senior at the 
University of Rochester, N.Y., 
received two awards this season 
at a post season banquet for the 
football team. 

The awards were "Greatest 



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Contribution to Offense" and 
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award goes to the player making 
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during the year] . 

Trubiano was a three-year 
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Trubiano was used mainly as 
a blocking back, but still 
managed to lead the team in 
rushing against Trinity, Lehigh 
and Saint Lawrence. Earlier in 
the season while playing in the 
defensive backfield he had three 
interceptions. 

The former North Quincy 
High School athlete is a Dean's 
List student majoring in English 
and a member of Delta Kappa 
Epsilon fraternity. 

He plans to attend a graduate 
school of Journalism. He is the 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Francis A. 
Trubiano of 81 Thornton St., 
Wollaston. 



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Thursday, January 18, 1973 Quincy Sun Page 19 



In Qulncy Youth Hockey Action 

Quincy Pee Wee A's Romp Twice, Tie 



The Quincy Pee Wee "A" 
team chalked up two thumping 
victories over Hull, 10-4, and 
South Boston, 16-0, and 
managed a 4-4 tie with Scituate 
in its most recent Bay Colony 
Hockey Association encounters. 

Mark Giordani got the 
three-goal hat trick and Jim 
Triglia had a pair of goals in the 
victory over Hull. Single goals 
came off the sticks of Brian 
Norton, Ed Kane, Neal Sullivan, 
Brian Bertoni and Brian Jolley! 

Two assises each were 
awarded to Ed Kane and Leo 
Doyle while singles went to 
Brian Norton, Mark Giordani, 



Jim Triglia, John Norton and 
Brian Jolley. 

Despite Hull's four goals, Jim 
Deitsch and Dean Prescott 
turned in fine performances in 
the Quincy nets. 

Brian Bertoni, John Kelly, 
Jim Triglia and Mark Giordani 
were the scorers in the tie with 
Scituate while assists went to 
David Lewis, John Kelly and 
Bobby Hayes. 

The Pee Wees, who have lost 
only two games this season, next 
meet Canton, Sunday [Jan. 21] 
at 2 p.m. on Rink C, Hingham 
Arena. 



McCabe, Craig Score 2 
As Mite A's Romp, 11-4 



Paul McCabe, Johnny 
Cummings and Kevin Craig each 
collected two goals as the: 
Quincy Mite "A" hockey team 
romped over the Abington 



Terriers, 11-4, Sunday [Jan. 
14]. 

Kevin Chase, Mark Tenny, 
Tommy Murphy, Mike McNiece 
and Richie Milano were the 
other scorers for Quincy. 



Squirt A's Lose To Brockton 



Brockton squeezed out a 3-1 
victory over the Quincy Squirt 
"A" hockey team Sunday as 
John Furey got the only Quincy 
goal. 



In a non-league encounter, 
Neil Shea's score stood up for a 
1-0 Quincy victory over 
Falmouth. 



Midget B's Win, 6-2 



Gary Delorio's two goals 
paced the Quincy Midget "B" 
team to a 6-2 victory over 
Rockland Friday [Jan. 12]. 



Jeff Murphy, Mike Faherty, 
Paul Lynch and Fred Murray got 
the other Quincy goals. 



Tiffany Ties, Loses 



It was not a very good week 
for the Tiffany Realty team in 
the Quincy Youth Hockey 
Midget House League. 

The Tiffs tied Cox Rambler, 

RICK REARDON SCORES 

Rick Reardon got the lone 
goal as the Quincy Mite "B" 
hockey team bowed to the 
Abington Huskies, 13-1, 
Saturday [Jan. 13]. 

SQUIRT B'S BLANKED 
BY EASTON 

The Quincy Squirt "B" 
hockey team was blanked 5-0 by 
Easton Saturday [Jan. 13]. 



1-1, Tuesday [Jan. 9] and then 
lost to the Fire Department 
Local 7 92 by a 3-1 count 
Saturday [Jan. 13]. 




SQUIRT 'A' TEAM that represents Quincy in the Bay Colony League includes front row [left to right] , 
Robert Craig, Tom Gerry, Chuck Marshall, Jim Campbell, Mark Vesey, Scott Richardson. Second row, 
Robert Zanardelli, Tom Mullen, Sean Dennis, Paul McGrath, Neil Shea, George Mackey, Mark Messina, 
John Furey. Larry L. Richards, Squirt commissioner, and Robert Craig, assistant coach, are in the rear. 

[Quincy Sun Photo] 

Fair Scores Hat Trick As 
Farina Takes Bantam Lead 



Johnny Fair came through 
with a three-goal hat trick 
Saturday to move Farina 
Kitchens into sole possession of 
first place in the Quincy Youth 
Hockey Bantam House League 
with a 4-3 victory over Bersani 
Brothers. 

Paul O'Brien collected the 
fourth Farina score while Jerry 
Smith, John and Paul Andrews 
got the goals for Bersani which 



dropped into a tie for second 
place with Blackwood 
Pharmacy. 

Derringer's rose up out of the 
league's second division to pin a 
3-1 defeat on Blackwood on the 
strength of two goals by Paul 
Barry and a single by John 
Reardon. Jeff Harrison had the 
Blackwood goal. 

The Quincy Sun also racked 
up its first victory of the season, 



3-1, over Johnson Motor Parts. 
Kevin Whelan, Richie Boyle and 
Timmy Sprague scored for the 
winners while Kurt O'Sullivan 
had the Johnson goal. 

In next Saturday's [Jan. 20] 
games: Farina meets Johnson, 7 
a.m., Rink A; Blackwood plays 
Quincy Sun, 7:15 a.m. Rink C; 
Bersani tangles with Derringer's, 
8:15 a.m., Rink A. All games are 
at Hingham Arena. 



Bantam House Standings 



Farina Kitchens 
Blackwood Pharmacy 
Bersani Brothers 
Derringer's 
Johnson Motor Parts 
Quincy Sun 



Won 

4 
3 
3 

1 
1 
1 



Lost 

1 

2 
2 
2 
3 
3 



Tied 





2 
1 

1 



Pts. 

8 
6 
6 
4 
3 
3 



Bantam Top Scorers 



HOUSF - Goals 

John Fitzgerald, Farina 5 

Bob Carmody, Blackwood 2 

Tom Wilkinson, Farina 5 

Dave Peters, Farina 4 

Paul Andrews, Bersani 4 

Dave Hurley, Blackwood 6 

Rick Dannar, Blackwood 5 

Jerry Smith, Bersani 3 



Assists 



Pts. 



6 


11 


7 


9 


3 


8 


3 


7 


2 


6 





6 





5 


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Page 20 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 18, 1973 



Hayes Optimistic Over Team 

Junior High-Freshman Hockey To Open 



By TOM SULLIVAN 

The Quincy and North 
Quincy junior high-freshman 
hockey teams [as well as the 
high school junior varsity team] , 
scheduled to open their seasons 
on Dec. 15, have been biding 
their time due to the late 
opening of the new Revere rink, 
where all games are slated to be 
played. 

Up until last week the new 
rink still was not ready and the 
local teams were due to open 
against each other yesterday 
[Wednesday]. The Quincy and 
North junior high-freshman teams 
were to play first, followed by 
the junior varsity game. This 
year all Quincy jayvee and 
freshman games will be played 
on the same bill as will all North 
jayvee and freshman contests. 

Friday the Quincy teams are 
scheduled to play Somerville, 
the frosh at 5 p.m., and the 
junior varsities at 6. Wednesday 
North and Chelsea are due to 
play at the same times. 



Last year Ken Hayes' Quincy 
junior high-freshman team was 
unbeaten during the regular 
Greater Boston League season 
[6-0] but lost in the playoff 
finals for a final 7-1 record. 

"I am optimistic about this 
team because the boys have 
worked very hard and many are 
back from last year's strong 
team," Hayes said. "I just hope 
we get to open the season soon, 
the long wait has been tough on 
the kids." 

Quincy 's "blue" or first line 
includes Bill Hammil, Sterling 
ninth grade; Frank Guest, Broad 
" Meadows ninth grade, and Mark 
G'iordini, Broad MeadoWs 
seventh grade. The first defense 
includes John Mitchell, Central 
eighth grade, and Nick Cyr, 
Sterling ninth grade, and the 
number one goalie is Jeff Nord, 
Broad Meadows eighth grade. 

The "green" or second line 
comprises Jack Powers, Broad 
Meadows ninth grade; Paul 
Gustafson, Central eighth grade, 



and Brian Flemming, Central 
ninth grade. The second defense 
unit is made up of Larry Calley, 
Central eighth grade, and Brian 
Watts, Central seventh grade, 
and the second goalie is Gerry 
DuBois, Point ninth grade. 

The "red" line has Dave 
Lewis, Central seventh grade; 
Dennis Bertoni, Sterling ninth 
grade, and Brian Bertoni, 
Sterling seventh grade. 

Also ready to play on the 
"red" line are John Yaxter, 
Broad Meadows seventh grade; 
Walter Pimental, Point ninth 
grade, and Paul Higgins, Point 
eighth grade. 

Jeff Gavin, Central seventh 
grade, will see service on defense 
and reserves include Rick Boyle, 
Broad Meadows eighth grade; 
Dan Higgins, Point seventh 
grade; Tom Bambeny, Broad 
Meadows eighth grade, and Pat 
Bamberry, Broad Meadows 
seventh grade. 

Managers are Charles Lewis, 
John Clark and John 
McDonough. 



Hammil, Guest, Mitchell, Cyr, 
Gustafson, Flemming, Calley 
and Dennis Bertoni were 
members of last year's team. 

"Guest was our leading scorer 
last year with 10 goals," Hayes 
said. "He should lead the league 
this year. His wingers are both 
great playmakers. This season we 
have three sets of brothers, the 
Bertonis, Higginses and 
Bamberry s. 

"I believe we have the best 
defense in the league in Mitchell 
and Cyr, who played together 
last year, Calley, who has 
improved a great deal, and 
Watts, one of the best seventh 
graders who knows how to 
handle himself. 

"Due to the fact the MDC 
gives preference to youth 
hockey, we have to practice at 
5 :45 and 6:15 in the morning at 
Neponset or Shea rinks. It is 
hard to expect seventh graders 
to get up so early, play hockey 
and then go to school. 

'This is the best bargain in 
hockey, considering that parents 



must spend up to $100 for each 
boy to play in youth hockey. 
Although we can't offer as many 
games, I believe our league offers 

better competition. Even with 
these early hours, the boys have 
responded well with the help of, 
understanding parents. 

"Our only weakness is in goal 
but we have been working both 
Nord and DuBois hard and they 
should be ready for North 
Quincy on the 1 7th." 

The North Quincy squads, 
like Quincy, have also been 
waiting to start their seasons. 



Quincy's jayvees are again 
coached by Jack Scanlan. Ed 
Grogan is again the North junior 
high-freshman coach and Bob 

Troup is the new North jayvee 
skipper, having taken over from 
Jack Crowley. 



In Track 

Raiders, Presidents In Wins Over Medford, Chelsea 



The North Quincy track team 
stayed in the thick 'of the Greater 
Boston League championship 
race last Saturday with a 48-38 
win over Medford to stay a 
half-game behind Revere with a 
3-1 record. 

North, tied with Somerville, 
stayed on the heels of Revere, 
which walloped Maiden, 60-26, 
to make its record 4-1 . 

Quincy also stayed within 
striking distance by defeating 
Chelsea, 48-38, to make its 
record 2-2. 

Saturday morning North will 
face Maiden and Quincy will 
take on Medford at 9:30 at the 
Medford High cage. Then only 
one meet will remain - The 
Quincy-North clash on Jan. 27. 

Bob Gentry's North team, his 
strongest in years, continued to 
set league records last week 
despite the loss of some boys 
due to college entrance exams. 

Bob McCormack set his third 
record of the season when he 
moved to the 1 000-yard run and 
won in 2:25.9. Bob had 
previously set a record in the 



mile and also in his leg in the 
relay. 

The big star for North was 
Jack Reynolds, who won the 
hurdles and high jump and also 
anchored the winning relay 
team. 

In the two-mile, sophomore 
Art Barrett, who has been 
coming along strong after joining 
North midway in the 
cross-country season last fall, 
won his first race. 

In the mile Bob Mackey had 
the race won when he fell just 
before hitting the finish line and 
had to be satisfied with third 
place. 

In the 600 Mark Canavan 
broke the league record with a 
1:22.5, effort but finished only 
third, showing the terrific 
competition in the league. 

North remained unbeaten in 
the relay, the event which 
decided the meet as Lee 
Watkins, McCormack, Jack 
Pomerole and Reynolds won in 
the record time of 2:47. 

Tom Hall's Quincy team was 
minus several boys through flu 



and the college exams but 
clinched the win, as did North, 
with a relay victory. 

Incidentally, this was the 
second time this year both local 
teams won by. the identical 
score. 

Ray Lawyer remained 
unbeaten for the Presidents in 



the 50-yard dash and Marty 
Swirko, switching to the 600, 
stayed undefeated with a fine 
1:22.9 effort. Marty usually runs 
the 1000. 

Steve Nolan, running the 
1000 for the first time, won that 
event, while John Johnson and 



Sophomore Art DiLoreto tied 
for first in the high jump. 
Johnson also placed second in 
the hurdles. 

Big Dave Sten won the shot 
put and the relay team of Pete 
Ramponi, Nolan, Dave DiBona 
and Swirko clinched the win. 

-TOM SULLIVAN 



Jordan's 26 Points Paces Atlantic-North 



Warren Jordan poured in 26 
points and Mike Kelly added 12 
as Atlantic-North Junior High 
ninth graders walloped Sterling, 
64-28. Jordan got 12 of his 
team's 26 points in a third 
quarter that broke the game 
open. 

Jimmy Duggan was high for 
Sterling with eight points. 

Atlantic-North's eighth 
graders also won big, bombing 



Sterling 34-9 with the McGinley 
brothers, Jim and Walt, getting 
eight and seven points 
respectively. 

Sterling seventh graders 
salvaged something for the day 
with a 12-11 win over their 
Atlantic-North counterparts. 

Broad Meadows Junior High's 
ninth graders edged Point, 
24-21, despite 11 points by the 
losers' Dwight Anderson. Chuck 



McDermott had 10 for Broad 
Meadows. 

The eighth grade team from 
Broad Meadows overcame a 
14-point performance by Point's 

Ed Daily to win 25-21. Lyle 
Morrissey and Jack Uhlar had 
eight and six points for the 
victors. 

Point's seventh graders won, 
10-7. 



Quincy To Have Three Teams In Ruth Loop 



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Quincy will have three teams 
in the expanded South Shore 
16-18 Babe Ruth League during 
the 1973 baseball season. 

Two of the Quincy teams, 
Raso Construction and Vin 
Smyth Club, will play in the 
league's South Division with 



teams from Braintree, Hingham 
and two clubs from Weymouth. 
The third Quincy team, 
Quincy Oil, will be in the 
Central Division with Randolph, 
Milton, Stoughton, Hyde Park 
and a third team from 
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The league was founded only 
last year with eight teams in a 
single division. With 10 
expansion teams already in the 
fold, the league will have six 
teams in each of three divisions 
for 1973. 

The league treasurer, John L. 
McDonnell of 249 Newbury 
Ave., North Quincy, points out 
that there is still room for six 
more teams, two in each 
division. New teams can join any 
time before May. 

The next meeting of league 
officials will be held Tuesday 
[Jan. 23] at 7:30 p.m. at the 
Quincy Police Station. 



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On The Screen 

By Vincent Puleo 



Thursday, January 18, 1973 Quincy Sun Page 2 1 



MaFlon Brando In X-Rater 

QUOTABLE, QUOTES: Director FEDERICO FELLINI 
expressing what motivated him to make "FELLINI'S ROMA": "I 
wanted to tell the story of a city. My city... To talk about its life, so 
varied and diverse. ..its many enchanting moods.. .its treasured, 
intimate moments. The secret joys which make Rome distinctly 
Rome... And at the same time to capture on film a portrait that will 
become increasingly obscure and complex the deeper one probes."... 

What is Rome? For FELLINI a seesaw labyrinth of memories, 
reality and fantasies... He was first introduced to the city of the 
seven hills when still a young man in the 30's when Italian cinema 
was experiencing an outgrowth of American cinema, one 
inauguration of Cinecitta... It was the era of MUSSOLINI; a period 
where thousands of extras roamed the oleander-lined streets, dressed 
in historic armor, helmets, boots, swords... The period of such 
colossal costume pictures, "SCIPIO, THE AFRICAN" and "THE 
IRON CROWN"... 

FELLINI'S Rome, the one he first experienced in 1938 has 
changed greatly since then. And yet "FELLINI'S ROMA" is tinged, 
honestly, with a pervading skepticism which, if we are to believe his 
filmed premise, is and always has been the scar of this city. ..a burden 
Romans have learned to live with.. .handed down unconsciously 
from generation to generation... A box office and critical success at 
the Cannes Film Festival and the cities it has since played in in 
Europe, "FELLINI'S ROMA" has established its place in the hearts 
of Stateside critics and viewers alike... For the picture is not only a 
visual portrait of FELLINI'S first love, but rather a single portrait of 
all great cities... 

"LAUGH-IN" gagscribers have been ordered to cool it with the 
shows lambasting Cleveland as a "sick and dull hicktown". Oh well, 
there's always Youngstown, Ohio... Television is climbing and 
climbing. According to the Television Bureau of Advertising, 
November was a peak viewing month with blurry-eyed viewers small 
tube watching a record 7 hours 4 minutes per home per day... 
RODDY McDOWELL is back aping. McDOWELL will be back in the 
fifth Ape- yarn, "BATTLE OF THE PLANET OF THE APES"... 

A tip of the ole' beret to two people behind the scenes: JOSE 
ANTONIO SANCHEZ for his fantastic make-up artistry on 
MAGGIE SMITH in "TRAVELS WITH MY AUNT" and CARL 
ANDERSON, the production designer who spent more than a year 
in capturing the authenticity and flavor of BILLIE HOLIDAYS 
"LADY SINGS THE BLUES". STELLA STEVENS has had it with 
the "sex symbol" bag. The young lady from Hot Coffee, Miss, plans 
on placing her charms behind the camera-as a director... 

"HIT MAN" co-star PAMELA GRIER is a cousin of former 
football great ROSEY GRIER... Odds and Ends: A remote section 
of Los Angeles known as "Africa, U.S.A." was once the filming site 
of the MGM-TV series "DAKTARI"... The brothers CORMAN, 
GENE and ROGER, yield an average output of 10 flicks a year via 
their New World Pictures company... And what's VIC MORROW 
doing these days?... Tho not the box office bait she once was, 
ELIZABETH TAYLOR has no need to worry for employment. Her 
next job, as the star natch', is "ASH WEDNESDAY"... 

JIM BROWN is signed, sealed and delivered for- United Artists "I 
ESCAPED FROM DEVIL'S ISLAND"... With its highly charged 
sexual scenes, the "LAST TANGO IN PARIS" could be the most 
controversial film released in 1973. Starring MARLON BRANDO, 
the motion picture will also keep his star afloat as controversial 
X-raters are sure $$$ box office lures... Producer PHIL D'ANTONI 
of "FRENCH CONNECTION" fans enjoys shooting in N.Y.C. 'cause 
of "the frantic quality of the city. ..and the abundant supply of 
performers and technicians"... • 

"TSAR TO LENIN" is one of the most important, extraordinary 
adventures in documentary history lensed to date. For historical 
buffs, a "must"... PATRICK WAYNE may never escape the long 
superstar shadow of his father JOHN. But he's trying... the young 
WAYNE will head the cast of "SEA CREATURES"... SERGIO 
LEONE'S "ONCE UPON A TIME IN THE WEST" is setting a 
marathon pace for long runners. In Hamburg, Germany the picture 
just completed its 103rd week running... 

ADAM WEST is finally getting over his "BATMAN" identity 
crisis. WEST is now an in demand actor for serious dramatic roles. 
Ditto RICHARD CHAMBERLAIN who had to restart his career in 
England several years ago to "escape" his "DR. KILDARE" image. 
"RAY CHARLES IN THE HOLY LAND" will be TV released in 
May to coincide with Israel's 25th anniversary as a nation... 




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Quincy, North Hockey Teams 
Out Of GBL Title Race 



It is all over for the Quincy 
and North Quincy hockey teams 
as far as the Greater Boston 
League championship is 
concerned and all that remains 
for the rivals are to try for a 
winning season and capture wins 
over each other in their next two 
games. They tied, 1-1, in the 
first game. 

It is going to be rough for 
each to attain a winning mark as 
the Raiders took a 2-5-2 record 
into last night's game with 
Quincy, while the Presidents had 
only a 2-6-1 mark. 

Friday night at Boston Arena 
Quincy will face Everett at 9 
p.m., followed by North's game 
with Chelsea. Monday it will be 
North vs. Everett at 6:30, 
followed by Quincy vs. Chelsea. 
The next Quincy-North meeting 
will be Feb. 9. 

Quincy's disappointed coach, 
Bob Sylvia, admitted his team is 



out of the title race following 
last Friday's 7-4 loss to Medford. 

And North's hopes were also 
dashed when it absorbed a 5-0 
defeat at the hands of Maiden. 

"I don't know how to explain 
it, but we continue to have 
trouble scoring and we have 
defensive lapses that go against 
us something horrible," Sylvia 
said. "Now it is time to get the 
underclassmen in the game for 
experience. We want to make 
sure the seniors get plenty of 
playing time against North 
Quincy, of course, but we intend 
to make some changes with an 
eye toward the future." 

The lone bright spot in the 
Medford game was the 'hat trick' 
by Quincy's outstanding 
sophomore, Ted Wiedemann. 

He scored the game's first 
goal on a pass from Charlie 
Crews but Medford went on to 



take a 4-1 lead after a period. 

Bob Costello cut the margin 
to 4-2 in the.second period with 
Pete Janis assisting but Medford 
had a 5-2 lead going into the 
final period. 

Wiedemann scored twice in 
the finale with Pete McNally 
assisting on his first and his 
second being on a solo dash but 
in between these two goals 
Medford added two. 

North held Maiden, runnerup 
to Revere in the league, to a 1-0 
first period lead but the Golden 
Tornado put things together in 
the next two periods. 

Earlier in the week Quincy 
bowed to Revere's defend ing/ 
champions and league leaders, 
4-1, with Crews converting 
Wiedemann's pass for the 
Presidents' lone goal in the 
opening period. 



QJC Still Eyes Conference Title 



Although the Quincy Junior 
College basketball team had only 
a 5-8 record going into last 
night's [Wednesday] game 
against Bristol Community 
College, the Collejuns bad a 3-2 
Mass. Junior College Conference 
record and Coach Earl 
Vermillion still has hopes of 
capturing the championship. 

QJC next Wednesday faces a 
big test at Massasoit Community 
College and the next night will 
play at Newton Jr. College. 

The Quincy team in its last 



game nipped Middlesex 
Community College, 72-71, and 
Vermillion sees a bright second 
half of the season. 

"Only two of our eight losses 
were by big scores and the 
others were by five points or 
less," Vermillion said. "We lost 
decisively only to Rhode Island 
Junior College and Bridgewater 
State Junior Varsity. 

"Rhode Island is one of the 
top teams in New England and is 
favored to go to the Eastern 
Regional Junior College 



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Saturday Evening 

DINNER SPECIALS EVERY EVENING 
LUNCHEON SPECIALS FROM 11.71 




piay-otts and possibly to the 
Nationals. 

"I feel we are as good as 
Bridgewater but just played a 
poor game and made a lot of 
mistakes against them." 

Of the remaining 1 1 games, 
10 are against teams QJC lost to 
by close scores and the Collejuns 
are hoping for some revenge. 

"We lost to International Tel 
and Tel by three points and 
Grahm by five for our only 
conference losses and we have to 
play each twice more," the 
Collejuns' coach pointed out. 

QJC has four players 
averaging in double figures and 
three of them had hit 30 points 
or more in a game. 

The best shooter is Jim 
Hurley, a six-foot freshman from 
North Quincy, averaging 16 
points a game and hitting on 45 
percent of his field goal 
attempts. He didn't play 
basketball at North. 

Green Team 
Wine First 

In St. Joseph's Hockey 
League action at Shea Rink the 
previous winless Green Team 
gained its first win by downing 
the Gold Team 3 to 2. 

In the second game, the Red 
team rerpained undefeated 
beating the Blue. 6-2. 

Jay Pasionek. after a three 
weeks absence led the Green 
scorers with two goals and an 
assist. Dave Labadie was the 
other goal scorer. Scoring single 
tallies for the Gold were John 
Bagin and John Alfano. 

In the second game the Red 
team came from u 2-0 deficit to 
defeat the Blue team. Goal 
scorers for the Red team were 
Rick Brunstrum with two. Mike 
McNalley [who leads the league 
in scoring) with nine goals and 7 
assists. James Crowley. Paul 
DeCristofaro and John Duffy 
each had a goal. Mark Walker 
and Dick Kelley had the pjily 
Blue scores. 



US RED CARPET- 

14 BROOKS AVE , SO QUINCY 

RESTAURANT & LOUNGE 
472-9300 

Open 7 Day, 9am ro I o m 



CHARCOAL 
SROILED 
STEAKS 

Frank Tracy at the Piano 

Saturday Nights 
LUNCHEON SPECIALS DAILY 






Page 22 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 18, 1973 



1 / 



LEGAL NOTICES 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of ANGELO BIANCHINO late 
of Quincy in said County, deceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court, praying that LOUIS H. 
DiBONA of Milton in the County of 
Norfolk, or some other suitable 
person, be appointed administrator 
of said estate. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Quincy 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the fourteenth day of February 
1973, the return day of this citation. 

Witness, J. JOHN FOX, Esquire, 
First Judge of said Court, this 
eleventh day of January 1973. 

Paul C. Gay, 
Register. 
1/18-25 2/1/73 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of NICHOLAS C. KOURY late 
of Quincy in said County, deceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by AGNES A. 
KOURY of Quincy in the County of 
Norfolk praying that she or some 
other suitable person, be appointed 
administratrix with the will annexed 
of said estate. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Brookline 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the twenty-eighth day of February 
1973, the return day of this citation. 

Witness, J. JOHN FOX, Esquire, 
First Judge of said Court, this fourth 
day of January 1973. 

Paul C. Gay, 
Register. 
1/18-25 2/1/73 




LEGAL NOTICES 



CITY OF QUINCY 
MASSACHUSETTS 

PURCHASING DEPT. 

1120 HANCOCK ST. 

QUINCY, MASS. 02169 

LEGAL AD 

Invites sealed proposals for 
furnishing and delivering to the City 
of Quincy, Police Dept. - Police 
Insurance. 

Detailed specifications are on file 
at the office of the Purchasing Agent. 

Bids must state priorities, if any, 
the delivery date and any allowable 
discounts. Firm price bids will be 
given first consideration and will be 
received at the office of the 
Purchasing Agent, 1120 Hancock St., 
Quincy, Mass., ufitil Feb. 7, 1973 at 
10:30 A.M. at which time and place 
they will be publicly opened and 
read. Proposals mus* be in a sealed 
envelope and on the outside marked: 
DATE: Feb. 7, 1973 TIME: 10:30 
A.M. Bid enclosed. 

The right is reserved to reject any 
or all bids or to accept any part of a 
bid or the one deemed best for the 
City. 

Richard K. Newcomb 
Purchasing Agent 
1/18-25/73 



CITY OF QUINCY 
MASSACHUSETTS 

PURCHASING DEPT. 

1120 HANCOCK ST. 

QUINCY, MASS. 02169 

LEGAL AD 

Invites sealed proposals for 
furnishing and delivering to the City 
of Quincy, Cemetery Dept. - 
Screened Loam - Approx. 1,500 
Yards. 

Detailed specifications are on file 
at the office of the Purchasing Agent. 

Bids must state priorities, if any, 
the delivery date and any allowable 
discounts. Firm price bids will be 
given first consideration and will be 
received at the office of the 
Purchasing Agent, 1120 Hancock St., 
Quincy, Mass., until Feb. 7, 1973 at 
10:00 A.M. at which time and place 
they will be publicly opened and 
read. Proposals must be in a sealed 
envelope and on the outside marked: 
DATE: Feb. 7, 1973 TIME: 10:00 
A.M. Bid enclosed. 

The right is reserved to reject any 
or all bids or to accept any part of a 
bid or the one deemed best for the 
City. 

Richard K. Newcomb 
Purchasing Agent 
1/18-25/73 



LEGAL NOTICES 



CITY OF QUINCY 
MASSACHUSETTS 

PURCHASING DEPT. 

1120 HANCOCK ST. 

QUINCY, MASS. 02169 

LEGAL AD 

Invites sealed proposals for 
furnishing and delivering to the City 
of Quincy, Hospital Dept. - Ice 
Cream. 

Detailed specifications are on file 
at the office of the Purchasing Agent. 

Bids must state priorities, if any, 
the delivery date and any allowable 
discounts. Firm price bids will be 
given first consideration and will be 
received at the office of the 
Purchasing Agent, 1120 Hancock St., 
Quincy, Mass., until Jan. 29, 1973 at 
10:00 A.M. at which time and place 
they will be publicly opened and 
read. Proposals must be in a sealed 
envelope and on the outside marked: 
DATE: Jan. 29, 1973 TIME: 10:00 
A.M. Bid enclosed. 

The right is reserved to reject any 
or all bids or to accept any part of a 
bid or the one deemed best for the 
City. 

Richard K. Newcomb 
Purchasing Agent 
1/11-18/73 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of JEFFREY T. BOOKER and 
ROBERT M. BOOKER, both of 
Quincy in said County, minors. And 
to the Attorney General of the 
United States, Office of Alien 
Property, if necessary. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for authority to mortgage 
certain real estate of said minors. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the seventh day of February, 1973, 
the return day of this citation. 

Witness, J. JOHN FOX, Esquire, 
First Judge of said Court, this second 
day of January, 1973. 

Bennett V. McLaughlin, 
Register. 
1/11-18-25/73 



LEGAL NOTICES 



MUSCULAR 
DYSTROPHY 



3.50i 

PER YEAR 



tesb Yc»r 

Sokscrist.se 

)■ Tsssyl 
( Everykesy '$ Doinf it) 




Fill out subscription blank bolow 
and send to: 

THE QUINCY SUN 

1101 Hseceek Street 
QUINCY, MAIS. 02169 



YOUR COPY WILL BE MAILED 

DIRECTLY INTO YOUR HOME 

OR OFFICE EVERY THURSDAY 

FOR 52 WEEKS 



I NAME 



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I 

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{ ZIPCOOE I 



Plea* Send Me 1 Year's Subscription to 
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Subscriptions May 
Also Be Placed 

By Calling 
471-3100 
471-3101 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of MARION L. PETERSON 
late of Quincy in said County, 
deceased. And to the Attorney 
General of the United States, Office 
of Alien Property, if necessary. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by HAROLD T. 
PETERSON of Quincy in the County 
of Norfolk praying that he be 
appointed executor thereof without 
giving a surety on his bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the thirty-first day of January, 1973, 
the return day of this citation. 

Witness, J. JOHN FOX, Esquire, 
First Judge of said Court, this 
twenty-eighth day of December 
1972. 

Bennett V. McLaughlin, 
Register. 
1/11-18-25/73 

CITY OF QUINCY 
MASSACHUSETTS 

PURCHASING DEPT. 

1120 HANCOCK ST. 

QUINCY, MASS. 02169 

LEGAL AD 

Invites sealed proposals for 
furnishing and delivering to the City 
of Quincy, Hospital Dept. - Butter, 
Eggs & Oleo, Milk and Cream. 

Detailed specifications are on file 
at the office of the Purchasing Agent. 

Bids must state priorities, if any, 
the delivery date and any allowable 
discounts. Firm price bids will be 
given first consideration and will be 
received at the office of the 
Purchasing Agent, 1120 Hancock St., 
Quincy, Mass., until Jan. 29, 1973 at 
10:30 A.M. at which time and place 
they will be publicly opened and 
read. Proposals must be in a sealed 
envelope and on the outside marked: 
DATE: Jan. 29, 1973 TIME: 10:30 
A.M. Bid enclosed. 

The right is reserved to reject any 
or all bids or to accept any part of a 
bid or the one deemed best for the 
City. 

Richard Newcomb 
Purchasing Agent 
1/11-18/73 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of ESTHER GABRIELLA 
JOHNSON late of Quincy in said 
County, deceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court by WHITFIELD W. 
JOHNSON of Watertown in the 
County of Middlesex, praying that 
the value of the property of said 
deceased remaining after the 
payment of debts and charges of 
administration may be determined by 
said Court. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the seventh day of February, 1973, 
the return day of this citation. 

Witness, J. JOHN FOX, Esquire, 
First Judge of said Court, this 
twenty-eighth day of December, 
1972. 

Bennett V. McLaughlin 
Register 
1/18-25 2/1/73 




THIS I.ACI CONIailUTIS »Y THE PUBLISH** 



LEGAL NOTICES 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

To the Attorney General of the 
United States, Office of Alien 
Property, if necessary, and to all 
persons interested in the trust estate 
under the will of HARRIET E. 
DOUGLAS late of Quincy in said 
County, deceased, for the benefit of 
RALPH DOLLIVER, FRANCES 
WARRINER and others. 

The trustee of said estate has 
presented to said Court for allowance 
its thirteenth to fifteenth accounts, 
inclusive. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the thirty-first day of January, 1973, 
the return day of this citation. 

Witness, J. JOHN FOX, Esquire, 
First Judge of said Court, this 
twentieth day of December 1972. 

Bennett V. McLaughlin, 
Register. 
1/4-11-18/73 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of GEORGE J. CLEVELAND 
late of Quincy in said County, 
deceased. And to the Attori.ey 
General of the United States, Office 
of Alien Property, if necessary. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by JAMES M. 
ELLIS of Quincy in the County of 
Norfolk praying that he be appointed 
executor thereof without giving a 
surety on his bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Brookline 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the twenty-eighth day of March 
1973, the return day of this citation. 

Witness, J. JOHN FOX, Esquire, 
First Judge of said Court, this 
twenty-eighth day of December 
1972. 

Bennett V. McLaughlin, 

Register. < 
1/11-18-25/73 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. - Probate Court 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of WILLIAM P. 
FITZGERALD also known as 
WILLIAM PATRICK FITZGERALD 
late of Quincy in said County, 
deceased. And to the Attorney 
General of the United States, Office 
of Alien Property, if necessary. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the la«t 
will of said deceased by FLORENCE 
M. FITZGERALD of Quincy in the 
County of Norfolk praying that she 
be appointed executrix thereof 
without giving a surety on her bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the thirty-first day of January, 1973, 
the return day of this citation. 

Witness, J. JOHN FOX, Esquire, 
First Judge of said Court, this 
twenty-seventh day of December, 
1972. 

Bennett V. McLaughlin, 
Register. 
1/11-18-25/73 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of EARL S. DUTTON late of 
Quincy in said County, deceased. 
And to the Attorney General of the 
United States, Office of Alien 
Property, if necessary. 

The executor of the will of said 
deceased has presented to said Court 
for allowance his first and final 
account. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the seventh day of February, 1973, 
the return day of this citation. 
. Witness, J. JOHN FOX, Esquire, 
First Judge of said Court, this 
twenty-second day of December, 
1972. 

Bennett V. McLaughlin, 
Register. 
1/11-18-25/73 



-■ - - ■**- — - 



471 
3100 



GOCMSS/f/A 



Thursday, January 18, 1973 Quincy Sun Page 23 



fOR TH£ ACTION 
YOU WANT 



i 



LEGAL NOTICES 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

To RUSSELL S. GROND1N of 
Braintree in the County of Norfolk, 
and to all persons interested in a 
petition for adoption of STEPHEN 
RUSSELL GRONDIN of Quincy in 
said County. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court by FREDERICK A. 
MILLER and DIANE MARIE 
MILLER his wife, of Quincy in said 
County, praying for leave to adopt 
said STEPHEN RUSSELL 
GRONDIN formerly a child of said 
Russell S. Grondin and Diane Marie 
Grondin his wife, now Diane Marie 
Miller and that the name of said child 
be changed to Stephen Russell Miller. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the seventh day of February, 1973, 
the return day of this citation. 

Witness, J. JOHN FOX, Esquire, 
First Judge of said Court, this 
twentieth day of December 1972. 

Bennett V. McLaughlin, 
Register. 
1/4-11-18/73 m 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of GRACE E. JACOBS late of 
Quincy in said County, deceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court praying that WALTER J. 
JACOBS and GRACE L. BLAIKIE, 
both of Quincy, in the County of 
Norfolk be appointed 
co-administrators of said estate 
without giving a surety on their 
bonds. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the thirty-first day of January 1973, 
the return day of this citation. 

Witness J. JOHN FOX, Esquire, 
First Judge of said Court, this 
twenty-eighth day of December 
1972. 

Bennett V. McLaughlin, 
1/4-11-18/73 RCgiSter - 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of ELIZABETH C. HOLMES 
late of Quincy in said County, 
deceased. And to the Attorney 
General of the United States, Office 
of Alien Property, if necessary. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for license to sell at 
private sale certain real estate 
situated in said Quincy of said 
deceased, and that the petitioner may 
become the purchaser of said real 
estate, in accordance with the offer 
set forth in said petition. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham, 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the seventh day of February, 1973, 
the return day of this citation. 

Witness, J. JOHN FOX, Esquire, 
First Judge of said Court, this 
twenty-eighth day of December 
1972. 

Bennett V. McLaughlin, 
Register. 
1/18-25 2/1/73 



For Home 

Or Office 
Delivery 




Coll 
47L3100 



i 



«** 



Moil* 




HAIL TO: QUINCY SUN 1601 Hancock St., Quincy 02 169 
WANT ADS PAYABLE IN AD VANCE... cash mutt accompany Older. 
Enclosed is for the following ad to run times. 



COTY: 



Rates: 
Contract rate: 



$2.25 for one week, up to 20 words, Si each additional word. 
$2.00 per week, up to 20 words for three or more insertions of 
the same ad. 

No refund will be made at this contract rate in the event of 
cancellation. 

Deadline: Friday 5 P.M. for the following weeks publication. 

Please include your phone number in ad. 



*■»«' 



HELP WANTED 



SERVICES 



LADIES 

Earn $20 to $40 an evening 
and wardrobe twice a year as 
a Beeline Fashion Stylist. No 
investment. For appointment 
call Mrs. Ellis, 293-7810. 2/1 



OIL DELIVERY 

Nashe Oil Co. 

Fuel Oil 

$17.50 -100 Gal. Cash 

472-5968 



2/8 



DO YOURSELF A FAVOR! 



Join our 


Fashion 


Frocks 


Family! Our Styles 


sell on 


sight. Earn 


$20 to 


$60 a 


night. N 


o collecting, 


delivering. 


investment. Call 


545-3950. 




2/8 



PAINTING 



Painting, Papering, Interior, 
Exterior. t)dd Jobs. Free 
Estimates. Call Joe, 
479-7376. 1/18 



INSTRUCTION 



INSTRUCTION 



Mind Dynamics, Inc. Alpha 
Brainwave Training. 
Relaxation, E .S.P., 
Awareness. For class 
information call Mr. R. 
Waldron, 235-7877. ?/i 



GUITAR 



Guitar lessons in your home 
by professional Guitarist and 
Teacher. Call 773-3588. 2/8 



Newsboys 

(And, New$girl», Too) 



t 

WANTED : 




1601 Hancock St. 

471-31 



• II 



SERVICES 



SERVICES 



FLOORS & WALLS 



Linoleum, ceramic tie, formica, told A ii 
Boon laid, sanded and (Mated. Many 
Wall Tie, c a ie e tf a g, Armstrong floor 



Hardwood 
(Roar store, 
of all types 



ART FLOOR COMPANY 

1123 Blue Hills Avenue, Dorchester 

TA 5-6179 

Open 8:00 5.00 Dan> 
Closed Sat. 



ALTERATIONS 



HALLS FOR HIRE 



Alterations done in my home. 
Reasonable rates. Wollaston 
area. Call 479-2539. 2/1 



BOATS 



I 



AIR CONDITIONED HALL - 
FOR HIRE. No. Quincy K. of 
C. Building, 5 Hollis Ave. For 
information please call 
328-5158928-0087-328-9822. 



Clearance prices on all 
boats. Storage & 
reconditioning of motors 
for winter. President 
Marine, 669 Southern 
Artery, Quincy. 773-5058. 

TF 



s 



INSURANCE 



gA^TRY 



If you have a basic 
homeowners policy for 
$20,000 and are paying 
more than $75.00 a year 
call 2824412 at or;*. 
Rutstein Insurance 
Agei.cy. 



Licensed builder, 26 years 
experience. Repairs, 
remodelintv ft additions. No 
job too small. Free estimates. 
Claries J. Roes. 479-3755. 



KEYS MADE 




DOYLE 4 LONG 

Fuel Oil 

ft 
Heating Equipment 

630 Hancock St., Wollaston 
Tel: 472-4800 



Locksmith on Duty 

GRANITE CITY 

HARDWARE 

1617 Hancock St., Quincy 

479-5454 



TAILORING 



MATTRESSE' 



MATTRESSES -Immed. 
Delivery - Can you use 
exceptionally good buys 
on king, queen, full or 
twin mattresses, beds, 
trundles, bunks at 
discount. Brand names, 
Sealy, Eclipse*, 
Slumber land, Englander. 
etc.; Bedding still our only 
business for over 18 years., 
open eves.. Siesta Sleep 
Shops, 221 Parkingway, 
Quincy 

"F. 



AL'S TAILORING 328-6915 
Alterations Fittings - 

Repairs for Ladies ft 
Gentlemen. Call between 
9:30 ajn. ft 4:30 pjn. 
Evenings 6:00 pm. to 7:00 
pjn. Also Zipper Service. 



TRAILERS 



DAMON PONTIAC ft 
TRAILER SALES ft 
SERVICE. Chateau. 
Lifetime, Road-cruiser, 
Hobo, Camel Travel 
Trailers & Motor Homes. 
Sales ft Svee. Route 
It-Bedford St., Abington. 
•704011. 



Page 24 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 18, 1973 



OUINCY JUNIOR COLLEGE 

A DIVISION OF THE QUINCY PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

SPRING SCHEDULE 1973 




EVENING DIVISION 







Credit 




MONDAY -6:30-9:10 P.M. 


Hours 


EC 202 


Principle of Economics II 


3 


EN 102 


English Composition II 


3 


FR 102 


Elementary French II 


3 


LA 202 


Business Law 


3 


PS 101 


General Psychology 


3 


PS 202 


> Child Psychology 


3 


PY102 


Principles of Physical Science 


3 


SS245 


Business Communications 


3 


SP202 


Intermediate Spanish 1 
TUESDAY -6:30 9: 10 P.M. 


3 


AC 202 


Intermediate Accounting II 


3 


EC 102 


American Economic History 


3 


ECE 101 


Introduction to Early Childhood Education 


3 


EN 212 


American Literature 


3 


EN 101 


English Composition 1 


3 


FA 201 


Survey of Fine Arts 


3 


MA 102 


College Mathematics II 


3 


SO 202 


Contemporary Social Problems 


3 


- 


TUESDAY & THURSDAY 6:00-8:00 P.M. 


SS 111 


Shorthand 1 


3 


SS 112 


Shorthand II 


3 


SS103 


Typewriting 1 


2 




TUESDAY & THURSDAY - 8:00-9:45 P.M. 


SS104 


Typewriting II 


2 


SS235 


Secretarial Procedures 
WEDNESDAY - 6:30-9:10 P.M. 


2 


Bl 102 


General Biology II [Lab.Mon. 6:30-8:30 PM] 


4 


Bl 104 


Anatomy and Physiology II 
[Lab. Mon. 6:30-8:30 P.M.] 


4 


ED 101 


Learning Disabilities of the Adolescent 


3 


EN 102 


English Composition II 


3 


EN 111 


Effective Speaking 


3 


FR202 


Intermediate French 1 


3 


GT212 


International Relations 


3 


HI 102 


United States History 


3 


PS 101 


General Psychology 


3 


PS 201 


Child Psychology 


3 


SP102 


Elementary Spanish II 
THURSDAY - 6:30 9:10 P.M. 


3 


AC 101 


Fundamentals of Accounting 1 


3 


AC 102 


Fundamentals of Accounting II 


3 


EN 202 


English Literature II 


3 


EN 102 


English Composition II 


3 


FA 203 


Music Appreciation 


3 


HI 112 


History of Western Civilization 


3 


MK202 


Principles of Marketing 


3 


SO 101 


General Sociology 


3 


LE151 


Social Health Issues - Law Enforcement 


3 



TUITION 



Division Of Continuing Education 

COMMUNITY EDUCATIONAL 
SERVICES 

Community Services [non-credit] courses are open to any person who 
feels that he may profit from them. This credit-free approach to 
learning makes it possible for one to continue to learn in an informal 
and non-competitive environment where learning is the only interest. 

AT QUINCY JUNIOR COLLEGE (ftVPeelfs f Tuitlon 

MONDAYS - 7:00-9:00 P.M. 

Creative Writing 10 E 

Illustrated Course on Antiques [7:00-8:30 P.M.] 10 B 

Dynamics of Human Behavior 10 B 

Effective Supervision 10 E 

TUESDAY 7:00-9:00 P.M. 

* Advanced Algebra I 10 B 
English for Everyday Speech and Writing 10 B 
Preparation of Income Tax Returns 10 C 

WEDNESDAY - 7:00-9:00 P.M. 

Career Guidance for the Mature Woman 10 C 

Personnel Management 10 E 

Basic Mathematics Review 12 B 

* A Feminist Look at Women's Fiction 10 B 

* Basic Photography 10 F 

THURSDAY - 7:00-9:00 P.M. 

Fundamentals of Investment in Stocks and Bonds 10 A 

Law for the Layman 10 B 

Basic Drawing 10 F 

* Conversational French 10 C 
AT NORTH QUINCY HIGH SCHOOL 

MONDAY 7:00-9:00 P.M. 

Algebra I [M&W] - [1 H.S. Unit] 10 E 

Principles of Bookkeeping II 12 C 

Conversational Italian II 11 C 

Effective Reading [A] 12 B 

Successful Real Estate Practices 10 F 

Shorthand -Beginners II 12 D 

Shorthand - Refresher 12 B 

Typing- Beginners II 12 C 

WEDNESDAY - 7:00-9:00 P.M. 

Algebra I [M&W] 10 E 

Principles of Bookkeeping I 10 B 

Conversational Italian I 11 C 

Effective Reading (Bl 12 B 

Real Estate - Preparation for the Brokers' Exam 10 F 

Typing - Beginners I 12 B 

Typing - Refresher 12 B 

Shorthand Beginners I 12 B 

AT QUINCY VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL SCHOOL 

From 7:00-9:00 P.M. 

[W] Introduction to Data Processing 12 D 

[M] Introduction to Business Programming 12 D 

[T] Cobol Programming 12 D 

* A new course offering 

+ TUITION SCHEDULE 



Registration fee $ 2.00 

Tuition per credit [Quincy resident .... 19.00 

Tuition per credit [ non-resident] 22.00 

Laboratory fee [Biology] 10.00 



A - $ 16 Non-Residents $20 

B-S18 Non-Residents $22 

C • $20 Non-Residents $25 

D - $25 Non-Residents $30 

E - $28 Non-Residents $32 

DCriCTDATiniJ. F$3 ° Non - Residente $35 

riCVJlO I HM I lUri. Registration Fee $ r 

MONDAY, JAN. 29 TUESDAY, JAN. 30 WEDNESDAY, JAN. 31 

TIME: 9 A.M. - 4 P.M. - 6:30 P.M. - 9 P.M.. 
Write or Call: Quincy Junior College, 34 Coddington St., Quincy 471-247C 






■ # ^, *■ v • ■ *', ' - r 



Thomas Craw Public " Ulrtrf 

Quincy, Maw. 



Serving ZJne ff(etropoli& \Jf ZJne ^>outh 3n 



ore 



C -< »- 

2 I 



s *i 




» 



3 
o 



Vol. 5 No. 19 



Thursday, January 25, 1973 



2<tf#ef* Oca* TffeeAlf Tteun/biflvi 



( 









1 




QUINCY YOUTH HOCKEY DAY has been proclaimed for Sunday by Mayor Walter J. Hannon. That's 
the day the Quincy Youth Hockey Association will conduct a decal drive to raise money to meet 
mortgage payments on its still uncompleted rink. Here the Mayor is buying the first decal from Scott 
Richardson, 10 [center] and Robert Hayes, 11. 

[Quincy Sun Photo] 




STATE STREET SOUTH, rising out of the moors off Newport Avenue in North Quincy, is beginning to 
look like what it is intended to be -- a 740,000 square foot operations center for the State Street Bank & 
Trust Co. When it opens its doors in May, it will house nearly 2.000 State Street employees who will be 
transferred from intown locations. The 80 acre complex also the New England headquarters of the 
Kemper Insurance Co. The MBTA's North Quincy station and parking garage are near the top of the 

picture. 

[Aerial Photos of New England] 



Three Times Lar ger 

Quincy Savings Bank 

Plans To Build New 
Downtown Office 

The Quincy Savings Hank plans to build a new 
three-story headquarters in Quincy (enter which would 
give it more than three times the space ol its present main 
oil ice. 



President Charles A. Pearee 

s;iiii today approval is being 
sought from Ihv Commissioner 
of Banks to proceed with the 
plans. 

The 3«,800 square loot 
facility ol masonry anil solar 
bronze glass would he built on a 
present vacant site on Hancock 
St. across I mm the Quincy 
Center MBTA station. 

The land,' located between 
the Quincy Llks Lodge and 
Masonic Temple and currently 
used tor parking cars, is owned 
by I he Reardon Realty Trusl. 

The site would be developed 
by S p a ulding and Sly e 
Corporation ol Boston and 
would have ample of f-sl reel 
parking. 

Mayor Walter J. Ilannon 
hailed the planned structure as a 
commit men I lo downtowji 
Quincy which would serve as a 
"catalyst" in encouraging other 
banks to follow and toward 
other development in the area. 

Pearce declared: 

"The Quincy Savings Bank 
h a s been in its present 



headquarters building since 
| k ') 7 . and, in terms ol 
modern* (I ay banking mil 
facilities are oul-of-dalc. 

•'The primary puiposc fur 
this move is to provide heller 
service for our customers anil a 
more pleasant lianking and 
working environment . I n 
a dd i t io n . i) u r p ro posed 
headquarters will enable us to 
offer customer parking and a 
drive-up teller's window, neithei 
o I w h i eh a re a va i I a hie 

presently." 

II pon approval of the 
Massachusetts Banking 
Department and Quincy City 
officials, development of the 
proposed Quincy Savings Bank 
hcadwuartcrs is scheduled lo 
begin in December. 

Present architectural plans 
call for a 3-slory, 3 l ),8()() square 
toot building of masonry and 
solar bronze glass. Present main 
office has an estimated I 2,000 
square feel. 

A proposed parking area will 
be to the rear of (he building 
| Cont'd on Page 2\ 



Brett Revives Idea For 
Southwest High School 



Rep. Joseph b. Brett 
| D-Quincy I has revived an 
earlier recommendation for a 
third high school in the 
southwest section of the city to 
relieve the overcrowding in the 
two existing schools. 

"A high school in that part of 
our city," he wrote to Mayor 
Walter J. Ilannon, "would be 
convenient for a large number of 
students who now have to use 



e 1 1 he r p u b lie or private 
transportation for travel to and 
from school. 

"Location of a third high 
school in southwest Quincy 
would relieve the overcrowding 
pressures on both Quincy and 
North Quincy High Schools and 
would eliminate the need of 
expanding either or both of 
those schools at tremendous 
costs." 



Memorial Service Thursday 
For Lyndon Johnson 



A memorial service for 
former President Lyndon B. 
Johnson will be held today 
| Thursday | at I p.m. it 
United First Parish 
Chureh--Quincy's historic 
Church of Presidents. 

The eulogy to the 36th 
President who died Monday 
in San Antonio, Tex., of an 
apparent heart attack, will be 
given by Rev. John R. 
(iraham, minister. 

Other speakers will be 
Rev. John D. Banks, pastor 
Bethany Congregational 



Church, Dr. Robert Nelson 
West of the Unitarian 
Association, and Mayor 
Walter J. Ilannon. 

Music will be by the North 
Quincy High School Concert 
Choir under the direction of 
Maurice Carbonneau. 

A Quincy High School 
unit will serve as honor guard. 

Just four weeks ago-Dee. 
2V-a memorial service was 
held at the same church for 
former President Harry S. 
Truman. 












■V* 



Page 2 Ouincy Sun Thurvday, January 25, 1973 



Quincy Savings Bank 
Plans New Building 



(Cont'd from Page 1| 

and allows for landscaping all 
around the building. 

Access to the drive-up teller's 
window will be through the 
parking area. The building is 
being designed by Architect's 
Design Group of Cambridge. The 
firm has worked extensively 
with the City of Quincy to 
develop a master plan for 
downtown Quincy. Bank 
officers and principals of 
Spaulding and Slye Corporation 
are working with City officials 
to secure the necessary 
development approvals. 

Commenting on the project 
Mayor Hannon declared: 

"Since assuming office a year 
ago, my staff and I have spent a 
lot of time and effort in working 
toward developing our 
Downtown area as a fine place 
to live, to work, and to shop - a 
"Total Downtown". 

"I am pleased that after many 
months of meetings with the 
officials of the Quincy Savings 
Bank that these fine people have 
made their commitment toward 
our new Downtown. This bank 
has always been one of the 
leading progressive lending 
institutions in the City and I 
trust that the building of this 
new beautiful home office will 
be the catalyst in encouraging 
other banks to follow. 

"I have reviewed the 
architects sketches of the 



proposed building and feel that 
this new facility will contribute 
greatly toward the development 
of the northern end of our 
Downtown. The development 
team of Spaulding and Slye has 
excellent credentials and a fine 
reputation in the greater Boston 
Real Estate community, and we 
welcome them to the continued 
development of our City." 

The Quincy Savings Bank has 
been in operation since 1845. 
Assets of the bank as of Dec. 3 1 , 
1972 were in excess of 
SI 57,000,000. making it the 
largest Mutual Savings Bank in 
the South Shore and the 21st 
largest savings bank in the state. 
The Bank has branch operations 
in North Quincy and South 
Quincy. 

Spaulding and Slye 
Corporation is a Boston-based 
real estate developer. Among the 
firm's developments are the New 
England Executive Park, a 150 
acre office park in Burlington, 
Massachusetts; Hampshire Plaza, 
an office-shopping mall covered 
parking complex in Manchester, 
N.H.; One Washington Mall, the 
firm's headquarters, in Boston; 
and Wellesley Green 
Condominiums in Wellesley. 

Charles B. Twigg, Senior Vice 
President, Commercial Sales is 
handling negotiations with the 
Quincy Savings Bank for 
Spaulding and Slye Corporation. 



Ward Majors Named 
For Mothers March 



The Quincy High School 
Band has been back from Dallas 
for three weeks now and still the 
contributions are coming in. 



last week acknowledged receipt 
of $25 each from the North 
Quincy Council Knights of 
Columbus and from Roy's 



The Band Parents Committee Flowers, Inc. 

Contributors For Quincy Band 



The Massachusetts Bay March 
of Dimes has named six Quincy 
women to be ward majors for 
the Mothers March on Birth 
Defects campaign which will 
continue through [Jan. 28). 

They arc: Mrs. John Kapples, 
ward one; Mrs. Charles White Jr., 



ward two; Mrs. Luigi Bolea, 
ward three; Mrs. Thomas Picard, 
ward four; Mrs. Robert Foy, 
ward five; and Mrs. G. Mclnnis, 
ward six. 

Quincy chairman for the 
Mothers March is Mrs. Kenneth 
B. Hammerle. 



BARKER'S 





PRIZE WINNERS - Robert Colman [second right] , president of the Quincy Center Business and 
Professional Association, awards trophies for the prize-winning floats in the Quincy Christmas Festival 
Parade From the left are: Ronald Kaufman, Young Republicans, the Festival Committee trophy; Jim 
Connors [rear] , Boston Gas Co., the QCB&PA trophy; Robert Alan, Quincy High School Band, the 
Grand Marshal Trophy; Prince David Kaplan; Princess Christine Simpson; Colman: and Thaddeus 
Gorczyca, St. Ann's Church Cub Pack 21, the Father Thomas Tierney Trophy and the $1,000 grand 
prize. Presentations were made at Sherry's Restaurant Tuesday. 

[Quincy Sun Photo] 

Quincy Christmas Parade Band, 
Float Winners Receive Awards 



The folks who put together 
the best floats and made the 
finest music for the Quincy 
Christmas Festival Parade last 
Dec. 3 got their rewards Monday 
night. 

The top award, the Father 
Thomas Tierney Trophy and the 
S 1 ,000 grand prize, went to Cub 
Scout Pack 21 from St. Ann's 
Church at the annual awards 
night held at Sherry's, Quincy. 
Included among the guests 
were Christine Simpson, 9, of 17 
Townsend Ave., Braintree and 
David Kaplan, 1 1 , of 78 Charles 
St., Quincy, who were chosen to 
rejgn as princess and prince of 
the 1973 festival. They will 
receive a trip to Disney World, 
Fla. 

Brief remarks were made by 
Robert J. Colman, president of 
the Quincy Center Business and 
Professional Association; John 
E. Murray, the association's 
executive director; George Fay, 
festival chairman; Mayor Walter 
J. Hannon and Anthony 
Famigletti, parade coordinator 
and Parade Float Chairman 
Richard Venna. 

Awards to float winners in 
the youth group: 

First, Quincy High School 
Band, S500, for the float 
"Dumbo". 

Second, Squantum Youth 
Group, $250, "Christmas in 
Disney World". 

Third, South Shore Cam pf ire 
Girls, $150, "Christmas 
Dollhouse". 

Fourth, The Koch Club, 
$100, "Christmas in Animal 
Toyland". 

And in the adult group; 
First, Quincy Young 
Republicans, $500, "GOP-PY in 
Toyland". 

Second, Supporters of 
Survival, $250, "Drugs Are Not 
Toys". . 



Third, Quincy Student 
Nurses, $150, "Toyland 
Hospital". 

Fourth, United Commercial 
Travelers, $100, "Dumbo". 

John Mulvey, of South Shore 
National Bank, presented the 
check for $1,000 to Cub Pack 
21 of St. Ann's Church, the 
overall grand prize winner. 

Awards to winners in the 
band categories: 

Marching band, first, St. 
Ann's of Neponset Band, $200; 
second, Holy Name of West 
Roxbury Band, $100. 

Class A Drum Corps, first, 
Imperials of Pembroke, $200; 
second, Fifth Maine Regiment of 
Portland, $100. 

Class B Drum Corps, first, 
Holy Family Defenders of 
Rockland, $150; second, the 
Annunciators of Cambridge- 
-Somerville, $50. 

John Farmer of the Hancock 
Bank presented a $200 check to 
the best high school marching 
band, Mansfield HS, which just 
edged out the Quincy High Band 
for the prize. 

Presented Trophies: 

Cub Scout Pack 21, St. Ann's 
Church, the Father Thomas 
Tierney Trophy. 

Boston Gas Co., the Quincy 
Center Business and Professional 
Association Trophy. 

Quincy High School Band, 
the Grand Marshal Trophy. 

Quincy Young Republicans, 
the Festival Committee Trophy. 

Mayor. Hannon made the 
award of the Mayor's Trophy to 
the Germantown Girl Scouts, 
whose "Christmas Dream" was 
judged the best Quincy float. 

Special,awards were made by 
Master of Ceremonies Win 
Bettinson of WJDA and Richard 
Koch to the Quincy High School 



Choir Group for participation in 
the turning on the lights 
ceremony and to Sacred Heart 
Choral Group for the nativity 
pageant. 

Each band and float that 
took part in the parade was 
given a framed color photograph 
of itself in action as a memento. 

Festival Chairman George 
Fay presented Mayor Hannon 
with a desk clock as a gift from 
the committee. 

Next year's prince and 
princess, David Kaplan and 
Christine Simpson, were 
presented with credentials for 
their trip to Disney World in 
Florida, as guests of the QCBPA. 

The trip, with a parent, is to 
be made any weekend after 
April 15 with three days and 
two nights in Florida. 

Each member of the Festival 
Committee was given a special 
plaque for his work in making 
the parade a success. Members of 
the committee were: 

Joseph Angelo, Remick's; 
Daniel Barry, Barry's Ship 
Haven; Bud Berlenbach, Curtain 
Call Theater; Win Bettinson, 
WJDA; Henry Bosworth, The 
Quincy Sun; David Coletti, 
Coletti Brothers Architects. 

Carter Caudle, Quincy Public 
Schools; Capt. Roy Cavicchi, 
Quincy Police; Remo DeNicola, 
South Shore Television & 
Appliance; Denis Donoghue and 
Robert Galligan, Sherry's 
Restaurant; City Clerk John 
Gillis. 

Lt. Anthony Malvesti, Quincy 
Fire Department; Richard Koch, 
Park and Recreation Board; 
George White, The Patriot 
Ledger; Joseph Whiteman, 
Gordon & Whiteman; and Mary 
Jane Fandel of J. Fandel Sons 
Inc. 



HEALTH FOODS 

MOTHER NATURES 

589 WASHINGTON ST . QUINCY 472 3658 

VITAMINS-SUPPLEMENTS 

Organic-Grains-Foods 

Granola-Wheat Germ 

HONEY-Gensing 



Newsboy 
Wanted 

In West St. 
Area 

Quincy Sun 
Call 471-3100 



Ihursilav.lanuaiy 25. I«>7.t Ouiney Sun Page .* 



Will Help Enhance Downtown 

Sawyer's New Store To Have Four Times Greater Floor Space 



Sawyer's Campus Shop is 
moving I'rnm Parking Way lo 
iMjttf and modern ipiaileis ;il 
1 5 OX MaiH.uk SI., Ouincy 
Tenter. 

The location, lonticrly 
occupied hy Capitol Mattel , is 
Mnn extensively remodeled and 
will "P*'» in hi i«l March, 
announces Jcny llniwil/. 

OWIK'1. 

The new sloie. with X.IMJO 
snuare leel ill Hour space, will 
l>e more Mian tour limes Ihe si/c 
i»l Hie old sfoie wheic S;iwyei's 
had heeu located the past lo 
years. 

"We hive conlidcnce lhal 
downtown Ouincy is a shipping 
area ol p.rowmp. impoilancc,*' 
said llniwil/. "We leel lhal wo 
have a pailicular I ype ol 
specially simp Dial has a m« he 
ol its own mi Hancock SI." 

Mayor Waller J. Ilannon 
hailed Ihe Sawvei's move as one 
lhal will enhance Ihe downlown 
a tea and seive as Imlliei 
evidenee ol Ouincy renter's 
"hemendons Inline" as a 
shoppmi'. eenlei. 

John I. i 'heney. development 
(ooidinaloi in Ihe city's other 
ol I'laumui'. and 'Development, 
picdiclrd thai Ihe new sloie 
"will assisl us in alhailme. new 
and exvilmr'. '»'lail mills lo oin 
downtown aiea." 

John I'. Miuiay. exeeiilive 
dnccloi ol (lie Omni y Cenlei 
Kusincss and Pi ol cssioual 
A s s o e i a I I it u . s.i id his 
ouMiu/alioii "is eeilainly happy 
|u have a inenihei displ.iv Ihe 
confidence he has in IhcOuimy 
< enter aiea." 

Ihe leltini to Hancock SI. 
will he a soil itl hoiuei oiiiiiii'. loi 
Sawvei's. 

Hie l»i|siness hcr.au with leiry 
llmwil/'s lalhei U) yens ar.o as 
an Ai my Navy sloie at Hancock 
SI. and Keveie ■!<«!.. |iisl a lew 
doois Iioiii I MIX. 

II moved onl ol the eily 
lit irfly in Ihe rally I'KiOs when 
a suitable downtown loealn - . 
eould nol he lonml. then moved 
haek inlo Ihe piesenl sloie al 
MX Talking Wav Ml I '»«•«. 

Ovei Ihe yeais. Ihe i hai.n lei 
ill Sawvei's has chanrcd 
I'.iaditally front an Aimy Navy 
sloie lo what il is loday a 
young man's spot I sweat and 
specially shop III whieh Ihe same 



15.9C.O.D. 

200 gal l. $31.80 

150 yalt. $25.35100 gals. $17.90 

24 Ho tr Scrvicu Quality Funis 

TONY'S OIL 337 2798 



The Arthritis 
Specialists. 




Sulh'i Ironi .iilluilr.'' At 
SICKIUIOM SI KVM.I 
you'll hud hydioi oll.iloi-.. 
wI>mI|mmiIs, b.ithtuh i. uh 
.mil w.ilkws .imonuoiu 
i:oui|ili>t«' lino ol r.pnt i.il 
i>(|inpnionl lot llm .irthiitic 



ICKROOM 
ERVlCEf 



SAMOSET SURGICAL 
SUPPLY CO. 

217 Samoset Avenue, 
Ouincy, 472 7200 




young men ean huy work 
clothes. Inn, il ihey want. 

Ihe new sloie with its N.OliO 
s<|uaie leel ol llooi spare is 
more Ihan loin limes the I.XIIO 
square leel al the present sloie. 

"We will retain Ihe same 
me I hod ol opeial inn on 
llaueoek St. that we had on 
Parking Way and lhal is populai 
hrands al lealislie pines." says 
llniwil/. 

Ihe new location is now 
undergoing a eoniplele 
remodeling iindei the design ol 
arelnleel timo Saeehelli ol 
Onincy. viee president ol 
Sehull/ Woodwoikiug <o. ol 
Caiuhi idge. Sacchclli also 
designed tin- lemodelmg ttf (he 
Sawvei's < a m pus Shop hi 
downtown lall Rivei. 

"Hy moving lo oltl laigei 
• piaitcis on Ham mk St. we aie 
s howi n g Ihe I a 1 1 h a ud 
conlidencc we have in Ihe 
Ouinev Cenlei area." says 
llniwil/. 

"We aie ilehghled ovei a 
ipiililv sloie like Sawvei's 
expanding heie in downlown 
O'uncy." said Mavoi Ilannon. 

"This is the Ivpe ol sloie we 
waul in downlown (.himcv II 
will enhance Ihe aiea. This is the 
type ol sloie we aie eiieomagiiig 
lo locale heie. It will he .1 
heaulilul sloie. holh inside ami 
outside. 

"II will add a lot ol .lav. lo 
Ihe aiea. And il is lutlhei 
evidenee lhal downlown (/UHU'V 
del iml civ has a licinctidous 
Inline as a shopping aiea." 

I' 11 I II used Development 
( 'ooidiuatoi ( licmv 

"One piolilcui in impioviug 
and developing ottl downlown is 
convincing Ihe piesenl iclailcr. 
lo upgiade and nupiove Ihcii 
tacihlies. This iiupioving will 
assisl us in .diluting new and 
exciting iel.nl mill', to < on 
downlown. 

"Sawvei's. which has hcen 111 
business ovei UFyears and in lis 
piesenl location ovei It) yeaiN. 
has ieiogni/ed lhal (Juiucy 
(euler is last hecoiuiug Ihe 
"lolal downlown". a plan- lo 
woik. live and shop and has 
made its coniniitinenl. 

"The new sloie will he an 
inipoilanl pail ol oin new 
downtown and a catalyst toi 
olhei iclaileis to lollow". 



INCOME 
TAX TIME 

Rent a late model 
Adding Machine 
$8.00 per week 
$17.50 per month 




QUI1CY TYPEWRITER 

SERVICE 

S Maplt Strttt Qaincy 

472 3ISI 




\H<:iini.<:rs dkawim; 01 iniw sawyih scamims stohi<; 

City Census To Begin On Feb. 1 



lis lime oin c again loi the 
people ol (Jiiiiicv. I / veais old 
ami ovei. lo si. mil up ami he 
coiuiled. 

Some (.(I oi /Il census takeis 
will Ian utt! acioss Ihe < 1 1 v led 
I lo hegin coiinliug '"' Ihe 
annual lislmg ol icsidcnts ol 
volnif> ape. 



Ihr. veil Iheie will he mote 
ic. nh iil\ lo count. 

In the past. Ihe census laker, 
listed all nsidenls 'II Ve.u . old 
ami oldei hut Ihe age hmil h.is 
heen moved ilownw.inl sun V Ihe 
vohng age was loweieil tnuii 'I 
lo IS. 

Ihe < il v I leik's oflh c -..nil 



Ihr. week lhal Ihe couiHrug is 
cspii led lo lake Imill " ■ In 
lline week s. depending upon I In- 
wealhei. 

I ai h i ensiis lakci will can V 
as idee 1 1 1 1 ii al ion .1 1 aid 
(onlaiiiiiig his 01 In 1 name plus 
Ihe 1 iiv ol (Jiiiik V seal m colli 
Hie 1 .ml is in ,1 ied plaslic i ase 




T E R 





On All Fall & Winter 

SHOES AND BOOTS 

Regular retail value to $42.00 




ALL 
ONE 

PRICE 





MILTON 
FACTORY SHOE OUTLET 

564 Adams St., East Milton Square 

Mourn: MoimIji) l» Sjihuday Or.'lO lo 6 P.M. Open TIiiiih A |'iiil;iy Ivveiiincs lil *) I'.IM, 

ALL SALES FINAL No exchfinues. No roluiul* 



ThePu 
The N 

TheO 
To Be 

Janua 



blic Is Invited To Attend 
ext Budget Meeting Of 

uincy School Committee 
Held At 7 P.M.Thursday, 
ry 25 y 1973 



l.anmire IV (iirnlon, Srrr«*tiUx 



Ouincy Srliool ('.mitiiiiller 



Page 4 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 25, 1973 . 



■ fc a ■ - — — 



Sunbeams 




Recent talk has focused on the re-districting of the state 
representative and state senate districts, but there's another 
re-districting going on that hasn't made much news - the re-drawing 
of ward and precinct lines in Quincy. 

Presently, the city's six wards vary greatly in population and have 
been described as unconstitutional - a violation of the one man one 
vote principle. For example, Ward One with 10,948 voters has one 
ward councillor, while Ward Three with only 5,340 voters also has 
one ward councillor. In theory, the people in Ward One are being 
under-represented, while those in Ward Three are over-represented. 

The idea behind the re-drawing of ward lines is to make all the 
wards of equal population. 

So what's it all mean? It means that there's a good chance that 
the new lines will be ready for this fall's city elections. 

Every ward will be affected, Wards One, Five and Six will be 
decreased while Wards Two, Three and Four will have to be 
increased. # * * 

ADVANCE WORK for Senator Kennedy's recent visit to Quincy 
and Brockton was done by School Committeeman Harold Davis. 
Davis served as Ward One chairman in the Senator's re-election 
campaign in 1970. * * * 

And running the whole show, as usual, was Richard Koch, 
executive secretary for the Park and Recreation Board. This is 
Koch's 23rd year as area co-ordinator for the Kennedy family. He 
first got involved as Ward Six chairman for John F. Kennedy when 
he first ran for Senate in 1952. 

• • * 

THE CITY HALL gang is hoping for a quick recovery for deputy 
tax collector Louis Simons, a patient at Quincy City Hospital. 

ST. BONIFACE'S CHURCH of Germantown will hold its fifth 
annual minstrel show at Broad Meadows Junior High School 
auditorium, Jan. 27, 28 and 29. Director is Ed Rooney. 

Ticket reservations can be made at the church rectory on Shed St. 
or by contacting Tom Buckley, business manager for the show. 

• * * 

ATTENTION BUTTON COLLECTORS: Arthur Andersen of the 
Tri-Town Coin Shop, 55 Franklin St., South Quincy, recently came 
across an interesting find at the Cape Cod Flea Market in Plymouth: 
two women's lib buttons, or rather women's sufferage buttons, circa 

1915. 

• # * 

HATS OFF to Tony Cannata and Carmen Leone, custodians at 
the John F. Kennedy Health Center. Visitors to the building are 
always impressed by their work. 

And don't be fooled, the banisters in the front hallway are only 

brass. Cannata polishes them daily to such a brilliance that at first 

glance you'd almost think they were made of gold. [You have to see 

it to believe it.] 

1 -kit it 

QUINCY NATIVE, Allan White, president of Hendrie's 
Refrigerated Storage Center in Southboro, was recently named 
president-elect of the National Frozen Food Association of Hershey, 
Pa. 

In 1954 he was voted one of the "outstanding young men of the 
year", by the Quincy -South Shore Chamber of Commerce. 

*** 

THE RECENT warm spell has people thinking of spring already. 
Joyce Thompson, secretary of the park department, reports she has 
received a number of requests for picnic site reservations and permits 
for use of city baseball fields. 

*** 

HISTORIC QUINCY: A look into city council reports shows that 
on Feb. 5, 1963, Councillor Richard Barry introduced a resolve for a 
study of the possibility of relocating Hancock Cemetery and using 
the present site for off-street parking. 

• ** 

SMILE DEPT. Charles Pearce, president of the Quincy Savings 
Bank, and moderator.^ the recent Chamber of Commerce breakfast, 
told the story of the mother calling her son to get ready for school. 

He didn't want to go, and she asked for two good reasons why he 
shouldn't. He replied that first, all the students hated him and 
second, all the teachers hated him. And he asked for two good 
reason why he should go. 

Mother replied that first, because he was 45 years old and second, 
because he was the principal. 




Jack Anderson 

1972 Pulitzer Prfee Winiwf for National Reporting, and 
Syndicated Columnist for The Quincy Sun 

# Blocking Mao's Missiles 

% Nixon Cutting Aid To Cities 

• Tenni$ 9 Anyone? 



WASHINGTON - The 
Central Intelligence Agency 
has reported that China is on 
the verge of becoming a 
superpower in intercontinen- 
tal missiles. The outgoing CIA 
Director, Richard Helms, told 
the Senate Armed Services 
Committee behind closed 
doors that he was "shocked" 
to find how close China is to 
superpower status in the 
missile field. 

It is true that China has 
been building nuclear 
missiles. The first missiles 
already have been targeted 
against Soviet cities. Helms 
didn't mention, however, that 
the United States has 
developed a defense against 
Chinese warheads. 

The CIA obtained samples 
of the metal that the Chinese 
use in their warheads. Our 
own nuclear experts then con- 
structed duplicates of the 
Chinese warheads. These 
were detonated underground 
in Nevada with X-rays from 
another nuclear explosion. 

Here's how the experiment 
worked. Two underground 
explosion chambers were 
built, connected by a tube. 
The Chinese warhead was 
placed in one chamber, and a 
nuclear charge was set up in 
the other chamber. The 
charge was set off. sending X- 
rays through the tube. TheX- 
rays then detonated the 
Chinese warhead. 

The tests were conducted at 
various altitudes, which were 
simulated in the underground 
chambers, upon warheads of 
various sizes. The results in- 
dicate that the U.S. should be 
able to throw up an X-ray 
screen, which would explode 
oncoming Chinese warheads 
in outer space. 

The X-ray screen, however, 
doesn't work against Soviet; 
warheads which are made of 
harder metals. There are also 
reports that the Soviets have 
made the same discovery. So 
the Soviets, too, may be able to 
detonate Chinese warheads in 
space. 

The Chinese missiles, 
therefore, may not be as 
ominous as Helms indicated 
in his secret testimony. 



— Agnew Relieved — 

President Nixon has offered 
to share federal revenues with 
the cities and states. Yet at 
the same time, he intends to 
withhold around $13 billion in 
Federal funds for city 
programs. This could increase 
the growing rot in our great 
cities. 

Here are some of the im- 
mediate effects of the execu- 
tive stranglehold on urban 
finances: The Department of 
Housing and Urban Develop- 
ment has announced a freeze 
on all housing subsidy 
programs. Important social 
services can expect cutbacks 
of nearly one billion dollars. 
Other cuts in federal aid to 
mental health will mean that 
people will be turned out of 
out-patient clinics. The 
federal government also in- 
tends to punish cities, which 
haven't completely elimi- 
nated welfare chiselers by 
withholding all welfare 
funds. 

The cutbacks have been the 
work largely of the Office of 
Intergovermental Relations, 
which Vice President Spiro 
Agnew has headed. Urban 
officials, therefore, started 
bombarding the Vice Presi- 
dent's office with their com- 
plaints. They were told, 
however, that he is no longer 
in charge. Agnew had quietly 
asked the President to 
remove the Office of In- 
tergovernmental Relations 
from his jurisdiction. 

President Nixon obligingly 
dissolved Intergovernmental 
Relations and moved the staff 
into the new Domestic Coun- 
cil. Insiders say the move was 
politically motivated. Agnew 
has his eye on the presiden- 
tial nomination in 1976 and 
can't afford to alienate local 
political leaders. He heaved a 
sigh of relief when In- 
tergovernmental Relations 
closed down. 

— Behind the Scenes — 

SILENT MINORITY - 
While President Nixon was 
making points with Chou En- 
lai in Asia, he was losing cre- 



dibility with his Chinese- 
American supporters at 
home. A prominent Chinese- 
American, we have learned, 
quietly pressured the White 
House to include a Chinese- 
American translator in the 
President's entourage to 
China last February. But the 
White House ignored the ap- 
peal which was made by 
David Wang, now a European 
correspondant for Voice of 
America. After the trip White 
House aide John Holdridge 
reportedly explained to Wang: 
"Frankly , David, we wanted 
to present the majority of the 
U.S. in this case and not the 
minority." 

HARTKE HANDSTAND - 
Sen. Vance Hartke, D-Ind., ap- 
parently has broken a com- 
mitment with union officials 
to back Sen. Ted Kennedys 
Health Care bill. Two weeks 
ago, union officials persuaded 
Hartke to co-sponsor Kenne- 
dy's bill. Then Hartke huddled 
with American Medical 
Association lobbyists. No one 
knows exactly what was said. 
But Hartke emerged from the 
meeting and told his staff he 
would no longer support Ken- 
nedy's bill. Union officials 
howled in disbelief. When a 
staff member told Hartke that 
union members were saying 
he had welched on his com- 
mitment to him, Hartke 
angrily fired the hapless aide 
on the spot. Fortunately, other 
aides intervened and a cooler 
Hartke reinstated the staffer. 
But union lobbyists are still 
boiling over Hartke's flipflop. 

TENNIS MAINTENANCE 
— Gen. Paul Carleton took 
over the command at Scott 
Air Force base in Illinois re- 
cently and was aghast to find 
no warm place to play his 
favorite sport, tennis. Coming 
from a hitch in California, 
Gen. Carleton had developed 
an interest in the game. Upon 
his arrival in Illinois,, 
however, the General quickly 
remedied the situation. He 
converted an old maintenance 
hanger into an indoor tennis 
court. The estimated cost: 
$2,500. 



QCA Voices Concern Over Drinking Water Quality 



T he Quincy Citizens 
Association has expressed 
concern over the quality of the 
city's drinking water. 

QCA officers have asked 
Health Comr. Dr. Alfred V. 
Mahoney to inform members of 
steps being taken to improve the 



quality of the water. 

For more than a year, officers 
said, "Quincy has been among 



the three cities having the worst 
quality of water in 
Massachusetts. 



For Borne 

Or OJfice 



<t«HMMNrAUWMIIieN 
fMW ""« MOM- TUCY AMfWT M 



. tr -nvy'm mm* to i 

M oowcrr*aL«.* 




Call 
471-3100 






Published weekly on Thursday by 

The Quincy Sun Publishing Company 

1601 Hancock St., Quincy Massachusetts 02169 

Publisher and Editor 

Henry W. Bosworth, Jr. 

Advertising Director 
John B. Powers 

10* Per Copy - $3.50 Per Year - Out of State $4.50 Per Year 

Telephone: 471-3100471-3101 471-3102 

Second-Class Postage Paid at Boston, Mass. 

MEMBER NEW ENGLAND PRESS ASSOCIATION 

The Quincy Sun assumes no financial responsibility for 
typographical errors in advertisements but will reprint that part of 
an advertisement in which the typographical error occurs. 



Thursday, January 25, 1973 Quincy Sun Page 5 



Letter Box 

Praises Senator Tobin For 
'Courage 9 And 'Dedication 9 



Editor, Quincy Sun: 

There has recently been 
unwarranted criticism leveled at 
State Senator Arthur H. Tobin 
(Democrat-Norfolk District]. It 
is a sad commentary, when any 
individual verbally abuses a 
sincere and hard working public 
official, but it is even more 
disgraceful when an individual 
distorts the truth by making 
disparaging statements that are 
not factual. 

Senator Tobin was named as 
vice-chairman of the powerful 
Ways and Means Committee this 
January. It is obvious to most 
citizens in the Senator's district 
that his well-deserved 
appointment is a result of six 
years of recognized hard work in 
the House of Representatives 
and 17 months of outstanding 
service as Chairman of the 
Senate Committee on Election 
Laws. 

Anyone who criticizes 
Senator Tobin without 
recognizing his relentless service 
and dedication to his 
constituents has the distorted 
perception of a muckraker. If 
someone else were elected as 
President of the City Council 
and did side with the Quincy 
Taxpayers Revolt and 100% 



revaluation; this someone would 
have the foresight of a fool and 
the desire to destroy a city by 
undermining the economy of the 
elderly, middle-income and low 
income homeowners. 

Fortunately, Senator Tobin 
has the interests of the people at 
heart and has the courage to 
stand up to the cajoling of the 
would-be political opportunists 
and headline seekers at city 
council meetings. Senator Tobin 
consistently stands up for the 
rights of the taxpayers and 
refuses to sell the people of 
Quincy short. 

I have had the need to call 
upon the services of Senator 
Tobin in the past, and not only 
was I immediately given 
assistance, but I was treated with 
the utmost respect and kindness. 
If a poll were to be taken among 
the citizens of Quincy, the 
results would show that Senator 
Tobin has done more to help the 
people than those who are 
sitting back hurling crude, 
vicious invective. When people 
heap verbal abuse on our elected 
officials, just to get their own 
name in the newspapers, their 
criticism becomes demeaning, 
cynical and worthless. 

Joseph A. Pugliesi 

33 Massachusetts Ave., Quincy 



Commends Water Dept. Employees 
For Emergency Service 



Editor, Quincy Sun: 

I wish to publicly extend my 
sincere appreciation for services 
rendered by Mr. Paul DiSalvo 
and Mr. Arthur Bruno of the 
Quincy Water Department. 

Friday evening, January 19th, 
a pipe leading into my water 
meter burst. Unable to stop the 
flow of water I called the Public 
Works Dept. and in a matter of 
20 minutes both gentlemen 
appeared, repaired the damage, 



removed the meter for repairs 
and got us back in operation. 

There are just as many 
dedicated, loyal and efficient 
employees in Federal, State, 
County, City and Town service 
as in private industry. 

Many citizens are openly 
hostile to our public servants but 
how many would swap their 
"take home" pay checks for 
those of the average rank and 
file employee? 

Joseph N. C.ildea, Sr. 
45 Division St., No. Quincy. 



<A Thank You 9 For QES 
Cotton Bowl Trip Coverage 



Editor, Quincy Sun: 

Thank you very much for the 
fantastic coverage given to the 
Quincy High School Band in 
conjunction with our entire 
"Cotton Bowl" extravaganza. 
Your stories and pictures gave 
the many thousands in the 
Quincy area a report on the 
results of their generous 



contributions towards our Dallas 
fund, as well as giving our kids 
memories for their scrap books 
they will cherish for the rest of 
their lives. 

Once again on behalf of the 
Quincy High School Band, Color 
Guard, and Majorettes, thank 
you. 

Michael Cahill 

Band Director 

Quincy High School 



Consumer 
Corner 



By ROBERT H. QUINN 
Attorney General 

Students are now registering 
for second semester courses at 
private business, career, charm 
and correspondence home 
training schools. In an attempt 
to guarantee that students are 
not misled or disappointed, my 
Consumer Protection Division 
has established a set of 
regulations which the schools 
must follow. 

Students enrolling in these 
courses offering them should 
remember: 

• Deceptive claims are 
o ut la wed --including false 
promises of "special offer", 
"free instruction", or "limited 
time offer". Courses may not be 
offered at fictitious "reduced" 
prices, scholarships must be 
legitimate and money back 
agreements strictly guaranteed. 

• Students may not be 
attracted under false pretenses 
such as help wanted ads thai 
purport to offer jobs-only after 
applicants complete ihe 
necessary training course. B'ind 
advertisements-commercials and 
brochures deceptively disguising 
the course— or any other 
deceptive language have been 
ruled illegal. 

• Sales or advertising claims 
may not distort the quality of 
the school or faculty members. 
Any connection with a slate or 
Federal government agency or 
any endorsement from a famous 
person must be valid. In 
addition, famous' personalities 
advertised as faculty members 
must provide more than token 
instruction. Deceptive or 
misleading diplomas also are 
illegal. 

• No school may mislead 
students about job opportunities 
open to them after graduation. 
Students may not be falsely led 
to believe that completion of the 
course will guarantee 
employment. Furthermore 
claims of "Earn up to .$$$" must 
be guaranteed specifically. 

• A school may not 
encourage candidates to enroll 
knowing that students would be 
ineligible for employment due to 
physical, educational or material 
disqualification. 




Beat the Big One- 
Heart Attack 

Give Heart Fund 



QUESTION OF THE WEEK 

Why Is It Called A Grand Jury? 



A caller to the League of 
Women Voters' Voter 
Information Phone asked if 
grand juries are called "grand" 
because they have important 
people serving on them? She had 
become confused by the rash of 
newspaper articles on grand 
juries and wanted to know what 
they are and how they work. 

Research by the Voter 
Information Phone staff 
indicated the people on grand 
juries are indeed important - 
they are registered voters in 
Massachusetts. 

The main purpose of a grand 
jury is to hear information and 
testimony about serious crimes 
that have been committed and 
to determine if there is 
"probable cause" to indict the 



accused for the crime. The 
person indicted by a grand jury 
is not necessarily guilty; the 
indictment simply permits the 
case to be tried in court. No 
serious crime is ever brought to 
trial without a grand jury 
indictment. 

A grand jury is a group of 23 
persons, in each county, chosen 
from the voting lists. The jury is 
called "grand" because it has a 
larger number of people on it 
than a regular or "petty" jury of 
1 2. Grand jurors are on call for 
six months. , 

They have the power to 
compel testimony from 
witnesses, who are not 
represented by attorneys. In 
secret proceedings (to protect 
people against unjust 
accusation 1, they listen to 



evidence presented by the 
prosecution only, investigate the 
facts, and may only return an 
indictment with a majority of at 
least I 2 votes. 

Grand juries are sometimes 
called for a special purpose and 
may sit for an indeterminate 
length of time while examining 
evidence such as the grand jury 
called to weigh the findings of 
the Massachusetts Crime 
Commission. 

This question is one of many 
now being received by the 
League of Women Voters' Voter 
Information Phone. Individuals 
with any questions on 
government may call the VIP 
Phone Monday through Friday 
between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. The 
number in the Boston area is 
357-5880. 



Living, Today 

By Dr. William F. Knox 
Personal Counselor 



Condemned To Relive Past 

My junior high school son came home recently with this 
statement "Those who do not remember the past are condemned 
to ,e-live it." I asked him where he'd picked this up. "One ot my 
counselors" he said. The school counselor immediately stepped up in 
my esteem. That's pretty good stuff at any level ot education. The 
earlier we learn this truth, the better. Let's look at this profound bit 

of wisdom. 

The senseless bombing in Viet Nam is an example ul not learning 
from the past. Might does not make right. Brute force does not win 
out. We'll be re-living tliis past for a long time I suspect. I tell so 
frustrated that I telephoned the White House to register my protest 
against the bombing. A secretary said he'd tell the President that I 
had called. I just can't forget what we've been doing. It haunts me. I 
feel terribly thwarted. ..yet responsible because I am an American. 
"Those who do not remember the past are condemned to re-live it." 
It applies to individuals as well as nations. Merc's John. ..in Ins 
second marriage. Would you believe that he's having Ihe same 
problems with Ann that he was having with Marge in his first 
marriage? His immature altitudes toward 
money ...sex... child i en... entertainment... caring for Ins 
belongings. ..gelling everything he wants! They've been married just s 
months and Ann says.' ■'Maybe Marge can live K years with this 
"littlebov man. ..I can only lake il for X months'" She wants out. 
John doesn't remember the past so he's condemned to ic-livc it. 
This is true of so many second marriages... and thirds. It only we 
could remember ihe past ...so we wouldn't have m re-livc il . 

Or lake Jill. She thought il was "so nice In have a man around the 
house". ..to fix screen doors. ..to stop leaky faucets. ..to lake hci mil 
to dinner. I lei husband is willing and able lo do all these and more. 
But he's dying for affection. Last month, un-heknown to Jill. In- 
stalled an affair with an o\'\^c girl. Il happened be fore... three years 
ago. "It's not what I want. Doctor, hut Jill has been just starving me 
for love. She hasn't learned a thing. .. she just won't look at what's 
happened in the past." So Jill is condemned lo re-live it. 

Those who refuse to give up their alcoholic behavior... refuse lo be 
adults. ..keep on being men hating women. ..women hating 
men.-..name your own pitfall of the past. ..refuse to remember the 
pain these things caused. ..they are indeed condemned to re-live the 

past. 

Why do people repeat the errors o\' the past. 
Hating. ..bombing. ..manipulating... immaturity. ..they got us in 
trouble in the past, and if we don't look at the facts we're 
condemned to re-live the same troubles. 

A second reason for repeating the errors of the past is that it's 
hard to go against the tide. We've been geared to believe that people 
are for exploiting. ..particularly If they're black, yellow, red skinned. 
or economically beneath us. Insecure people exploit and hate other 
people different from themselves. 

I believe that People Are For Loving, lie who has learned to love 
people has profited from the past. ..will know the rewards o\' the 
future. 

For People Are For Loving. Dr. Kiu>x's new book, write him 
sending S3 to 320 Washington St., Norwcll. Mass. 020b I 

FOR YOUR COM MINTS: Group Therapy, or Private 
Counselling, write Dr. Knox at (>2K High St.. Dedham or call 
320-5990 or b59-7595. 

• Youth Speaks Out 

• The song "Shaft" was played at the Inaugural Ball. I wonder if 
that's indicative of the next four years. 

• A defendant in the Watergate trial claims he bugged Democratic 
headquarters "for his Country" - Benedict Arnold made a similar 
claim. 

• The Quincy basketball team with all its injuries may either ask the 
undefeated girl's team to take over or ask to join a wheelchair 
league. 

• The Prom Committee selected a theme for the Senior Prom. Those 
students who suggested "We Gotta Get Out of This Place" will be 
disappointed. 

• The UCLA basketball team is going for its 00th in a row. Rumors 
arc Hying that they will replace the Philadelphia 7b'ers who have lost 
45 in the NBA. 

• President Nixon was very light on his feet at the Inaugural Ball. It's 
too bad he can't dance his way out of Viet Nam. 

Q.H.S. Journalism Class 



birth 

defects 

are forever. 



a 



,41 t 




march of Dimes 



unless you help. 



THII **»C« CONTHI.UTtO »T tHI PU.LI«M«« 



Page 6 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 25, 1973 



'Hello Dolly' Movie Highlights 
Heart Fund Theater Party 



. 



Richard J. Koch, special 
events chairman of the Quincy 
Heart Fund announces that the 
feature attraction at the Fourth 
Annual Quincy Heart Fund 
Theater Party will be the jmoviei 
"Hello Dolly", starring Barbra 
Streisand, Walter Matthau, Louis 
Armstrong and Michael 
Crawford. 

The program is scheduled for 
Feb. 14, at 7:30 p.m. at the 
Wollaston Theatre, 14 Beale St., 
Wollaston. 

Several stage acts and 
awarding of door prizes will 
precede the 8:30 p.m. movie. 

Koch, serving his fourth year 
as special events chairman has 
set a goal of $1,000 for the 
Heart Fund. The previous three 
years saw amounts of $842., 
$900., and $902. raised. 

Mayor Walter J. Mannon has 
been named Honorary Chairman 
of the program for the 1973 
Special K vents Activities. 



Ticket Chairman John J. 
Daniels announces that 700 
tickets hav* been sold. The 
theatre seats 1,200 persons, 
tickets are 99 cents each. 

Other committee members 
include: 

Terry DiBona, Thomas 
Morrissey, Raymond Cattaneo, 
George Page, Frank Rusconi, 
Daniel Barry, Clementine Brill, 
Charles Alongi, Richard M. 
Morrissey, Agatha Peschenes, 
Helen McGachie, Carmen Leone, 
Joseph Shea, Frank McLaughlin, 
Harold Davis and Joyce 
Thompson. 

Drr Sumner D. Hirshberg of 
156 Monroe Rd, Quincy, is 1973 
General Chairman of the Heart 
Fund Drive. The residential or 
house-to-house campaign will be 
conducted Sunday, Feb. 25. 

Those wishing to assist as 
volunteers for the special events 
or residential drives may contact 
Dr. Hirshberg or Koch. 



Joseph Kahler To Be Installed 
S.S. District HNS President 



Joseph Kahler of 62 Ruggles 
St., Quincy Point will be 
installed president of the South 
Shore District Holy Name 
Society Jan. 28 at 7 p.m. at 
Sacred Heart Church, Weymouth 
Landing. 

Other officers to be installed 
are: 

Arthur McMillan, 
vice-president; Raymond 
DiBona, secretary; John F. 
Cotter, treasurer and marshalls 
Louis J. Kensta and Paul Bassett, 
all of Weymouth. 

Rosary and Benediction will 
precede the installation. 



celebrated by Rev. Joseph 
Downey, Spiritual Director of 
the District and pastor of St. 
Joseph's Church, Quincy Point. 

The newly appointed 
Archdiocesan Spiritual Director, 
the Rev. James Lanergan, will 
address the men at the meeting 
following the services, in the 
lower hall. 

Speakers will also include 
Alfred Odermatt of Cohasset, 
Archdiocesan Treasurer and J. 
William LeClair of Quincy, Area 
Coordinator. 

All are welcome to attend the 
meeting. 



jB^t 



4 

Fashion 
153* Harnnk St., Quincy 

Men. Tbrv Sit. 10 - 
Thus, ft Fri. Til 9 

CLEARANCE 
SALE 

Suits, Drasses 
and Robes 

20% to 50% Off 
Sizes 8-20 




Many different styles! 




GAIL CARELLA, 26 Larry 
Place, West Quincy, has been 
elected editor of the 
YEARBOOK at Aquinas Junior 
College. Gail is a senior in the 
Executive Secretarial Course. 
She hopes to work in a travel 
agency or the airlines upon 
graduation from Aquinas. 



Marriage 
Intentions 



Bernard J. Ericson, 91 South 
St., Quincy, cook; Denice A. 
Buck, 257 Granite St., Quincy, 
nurses aide. 

Paul P. Chella, 47 River St., 
Quincy, police cadet; Kathylene 
F. Pavidis, 74 Lenox St., 
Quincy, nursing assistant. 

John J. Stephens, 70 Queen 
Ann's Drive, Weymouth, 
mechanic; Catherine E. Bailey, 
16 Lawrence St., Quincy, clerk. 

Robert H. Reuter Jr., 6 
Brownfield St., Quincy, 
customer service; Sharon E. 
McCann, 82 Hall St., Randolph, 
approver. 



THE 

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2 PARK AVE. 

SQUANTUM 

TAKE PLEASURE 

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THAT 

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THEIR STAFF 

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We also have five other ways to save, so you can choose one that's exactly 
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St. Mary's Parish 
Plans St. Patrick's Dinner 



A meeting was held at the 
home of Mrs. Kevin Little, 39 
Grove St., Quincy Wednesday to 
discuss plans for a St. Patrick's 
Day dinner-dance to be held in 
the church hall March 17. 

Mrs. Little will serve as 
chairman of the annual event 
with Mrs. Joseph LaRaia as 
ticket chairman. 

Mrs. Gerald Kilcommins is in 



charge of decorations and Mrs. 
John Erickson, publicity. A 
catered Ham and Corn Beef 
dinner will be served by Hart 
Caterers. 

Dance music till midnight will 
be provided by Gil Loring's 
orchestra. 

There will also be 
entertainment during the 
evening. 



North Quincy Knights 
Annual Italian Night Saturday 



North Quincy Knights of 
Columbus will hold their annual 
Italian Night at Quincy Armory 
Saturday. A social hour will start 
at 6 p.m. with dinner at 7: 15. 

Guests will include James A. 
Burke, Mayor Walter Hannon, 
State Deputy Knights of 
Columbus Michael E. Faherty, 
District Deputy Fred Sperazzo 



and Rev. Edward Flaherty, 
pastor of St. Ann's Church, who 
is Chaplain, will join Grand 
Knight Frank Dorney at the 
head table. 

A full eight course meal will 
be catered by Guiliano of 
Brockton. Music will be by Earl 
Healy. Alfred Del Cupolo is 
chairman and Ken Runge, 
co-chairman. 



QSPA Las Vegas Night 



The Quincy School Parents 
Association will sponsor a 
"Night in Las Vegas" from 8 
p.m. to midnight Saturday at the 
Carlton House, North Quincy. 

Proceeds will go to the 
individualized learning program 



at the school. 

Mrs. Judith Freeman is 
chairman and Mrs. Rose Koelsch 
is co-chairman for the event. 
Committee members include 
Mrs. Gloria Budrick and Mrs. 
Madeline Burke. 



Virginia Winn Chairman 
Catholic Alumni Club Dance 



The Catholic Alumni Club of 
Boston will hold a dance Friday 
at 8 p.m. in the Sons of Italy 
Social Center on Quarry St., 
Quincy. 

Chairman of the dance is Miss 
Virginia Winn of Wollaston. 



Members of her committee 
include Marilyn Napierski of 
West Quincy and Frances 
McDonald of Quincy. 

Music by Kelly will play for 
the dance and tickets will be 
sold at the door. 



Airman William Dunham Graduates 



Airman William J. Dunham, 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. 
Dunham of 17 Sea Gull Road, 
Adams Shore, has graduated at 
Sheppard AFB, Tex., from the 
U.S. Air Force aircraft mechanic 
course conducted by the Air 
Training Command. 

Dunham, who was trained to 
repair current Air Force jet 



fighters, is being assigned to Otis 
AFB, Mass., for duty with a unit 
of the Military Airlift Command 
which provides global airlift for 
U.S. military forces. 

Airman Dunham is a 1971 
graduate of Kents Hill [Maine] 
High School and attended New 
England Aeronautical Institute, 
Nashua, N.H. 



****************************** 



i 
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PERMANENT REMOVAL 
OF UNWANTED HAIR 

Lola F. Kilduff, R.E. 

Registered and Licensed Electrologist 

For Men and Women 
By Appointment Only - Day or Evening 
Consultations Invited 
1621 Hancock St.. Quincy Suite 8 773-1532, 



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41 Btalt Strett 
Wallasten. Matt. 
472-1111 472 7110 




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SABINA 

WELL KNOWN 
FA SHION MODE L 

If AUTY CONSULTANT 
HAIK STYLIST 

M AKE UP (SAUN A) 

SENIOR CITIZENS 
WASH & SET $1.75 

HAIR CUT $1.00 



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WASH 4 SET Vi PRICE 



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| SABINA 



Thursday, January 25, 1973 Quincy Sun Page 7 




ENGAGED - Mr. and Mrs. James McGuire of 108 Baxter Awe., 
Quincy, announce the engagement of their daughter, Jane Elizabeth 
to Clifford E. Sherman Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Clifford E. Sherman 
Sr., of North Attleboro. Miss McGuire is a graduate of Quincy High 
School and Boston State College and is a teacher at Daniel Webster 
School, Quincy. Mr. Sherman attended Furman University, 
Greenville, S.C., and is a graduate of Athens College, Athens, Ala. He 
is a teacher in the Attleboro School System. A July wedding is 
D,anned - [Miller Studio] 

St. John's Junior League 
Progressive Dinner Saturday 



Reservations are closed for 
the annual progressive dinner to 
be held Saturday by St. John's 
Junior League. 

Members and their guests will 
have cocktails at the homes of 
Mr. and Mrs. David Ring, 14 
Barry St., Quincy, and Mr. and 
Mrs. John Tormey, 154 Putnam 
St., Quincy. 

Dinner will be served at the 
homes of Mrs. William Boethel, 
92 Webster St., Randolph; Mr. 
and Mrs. John J. Thomas, 21 
Mast Hill Rd, Hingham; and Mr. 



and Mrs. Loretto Bersani, 1045 
Furnace Brook Parkway, 
Quincy. 

Music and dancing will follow 
at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Carl 
Bersani, 35 O'Connell Ave., 
Ouincy. A New Orleans theme 
will be used. 

Serving on the committee are 
Mrs. Domenic Lomanno, Mrs. 
Anthony Aimola, Mrs. Albert 
Coletta, Mrs. Robert Tombari, 
Mrs. William Jolicoeur and Mrs. 
Ferdinand DeNicola, club 
President. 



Mrs. Stanley Nelson - 
Ladies' Aid Circle Leader 



Mrs. Stanley Nelson of 
Magnolia St., Braintree, was 
elected leader of the Ladies' Aid 
Circle of the Covenant 
Congregational Church of 
Quincy at its annual meeting 
Jan. 17. 

Mrs. Nelson will be assisted 
by Mrs. Ruth Nelson, of 
Wollaston, outgoing leader, Mrs. 
Albert Anderson, Mrs. Tyra 
Andersen of Braintree, Mrs. 
Anna Jacobson, Mrs. Samuel 



Collins of Quincy, Mrs. Arvid 
Jacobson of Milton and Mrs. 
Elmer Butman of Norwell. 




At Quincy City Hospital 

January 15 

Mr. and Mrs. William M. 
Vieno, 31 Mechanic St., a 
daughter. 

January 16 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald Papkey, 
33 Franklin Ave., a son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis J. 
Ambrosino, 46 Rodman St., a 
daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth R. 
Cunningham, 12 Myrtle St., a 
son. 

January 17 

Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Wilson, 
5 1 1 Hancock St., a daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert 
Mezzetti, 29 Janet Road, a son. 

January 19 

Mr. and Mrs. John Mosesso, 4 
Marlboro St., a son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Craig 
MacPherson, 150 Taylor St., a 
daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lee Higgins, 253 
Farrington St., a daughter. 

January 20 

Mr. and Mrs. David Bertrand, 
48 Rogers St., a son. 

Michael Perito 

Returns 
From West Indies 

Michael Perito, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Paul T. Perito of 1417 
Quincy Shore Drive, Quincy, 
recently completed a two week 
trip to the Island of Antigua in 
the West Indies, under the 
direction of Proctor Academy 
where Mike is a senior. 

Purpose of the program is to , 
give the students an opportunity 
for an indepth study of Marine 
Biology and Natural History 
which can be used upon 
returning to the classroom 
during winter term. 



DERRINGER 

THE FLORIST 

Plants Arrangements /• lowers 

389 Hancock St. 773-0959 



NEWSBOYS WANTED 
Here's a chance to earn extra 

money by building a Quincy 

Sun home delivery route. 

Telephone: 471-3100 



Quincy Sons Of Italy 
Social Center 

120 Quarry St. Quincy 

Newest function hall now available for weddings, showers, dinner 
dances. Main [Golden Lion] Suite has cathedral ceiling. Brides 
room - ultra modern sound system. Completely air conditioned. 

FOR RESERVATION CALL 
v 773-2687 AFTER 2 P.M. 



JEWELERS 




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Quincy, Mm ^*«1 

773-2170 

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IDENTIFICATION 

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ROBERTS. FREEMAN 
CERTIFIED GEMOLOGIST 
AMERICAN GEM SOCIETY 





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OPEN SUNDAYS 



94 WASHINGTON ST WIYMOOTK UUtOINC 





ENGAGED - Mr. and Mrs. Dominic Commesso ot b/ Kilby St., 
Hingham, announce the engagement of their daughter Elizabeth 
Commesso to Paul J. Deane, son of Mr. and Mrs. John F. Deane of 
97 Doane St., Quincy. Miss Commesso attended Hingham High 
School and is planning a career in modeling. Mr. Deane is a graduate 
of Quincy Vocational Technical School and is employed at New 
England Marina Corp. There are no immediate wedding plans. 

FSpillane Studio] 

Wollaston Mothers Club 
To Hear Chinese Minister 



Dr. Peter Shih of Boston 
Chinatown, A Chinese Minister, 
will address the Wollaston 
Mothers Club at Wollaston 
Lutheran Church, 550 Hancock 
St., Wollaston, today 
[Thursday | at 12:45 p.m. 

Dr. Peter Shih, well known in 
Chinatown, will speak on 
Chinese Culture and traditions 
and the Boslonian Chinese way 
of life. Members and guests are 
welcome to learn about Hie most 
complex, sophisticated, yet the 
most unknown culture in our 
time. 

Mrs. Frnest Johnson is 
chairman. Culinary and glad 
tidings committees will be 



hostesses. Members urc: Mrs. 
1 rank Schifone, Mrs. Francis 
Frank), Mrs. George Bray. Mrs. 
Louis Ciarfella, Mrs. Walter 
Fleming, Mrs. John Johnson, 
Mrs. Fdwurd McDonagh, Mrs. (!. 
Pri/.io, Mrs. J. Salamone, Mrs. 
Arthur Senter. Mrs. P. Spring, 
Mrs. Tom Ames, Mrs. J. Bersani, 
Mrs. O. Johnson, Mis. Patrick 
Noonan, Mrs. F. Peterson. Mrs. 
B. Prilchard, Mrs. George Traun, 
Mrs. A. Trott and Mrs. J. Wood. 

There will be a coffee hour 
before the regular business 
meeting, Mrs. J. Cunningham 
will preside. Baby silling will be 
provided. 



Iceland Program At Stamp Club Jan. 27 



President Fletcher Boig will 
present an illustrated talk on 
Iceland at the Granite City 



Stamp Club meeting Jan. 27 at 
Senior Citizens Hall, High 
School Ave. 





COLPITIS T «* v ««- 

1550 Hancock St.. Quincy 472 005 1 

Call Colpitis Now 472-0051 

Take A 
Bermuda Break 

In Rendezvous Time 1 

We will be happy to 
arrange your vacationl 




.■-~»-: 



Off Season Rates Are Now ; 
In Effect Until March J 



Page 8 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 25, 1973 




Bethany Church Votes 
$93,232 , Elects Officers 



Mrs. Clara M. Kappler, 85, of 
20 Pond St., Brain tree, formerly 
of Quincy, at the Franvale 
Nursing Home, Jan. 13. 

Ansel G. Bennett, 64, of 85 
Grove St., at the Lemuel 
Shattuck Hospital, Boston, Jan. 
14. 

Mrs. Gerald ine F. /Ferry/ 
Fitzgerald, 41, of 1450 
Worcester Rd, Framingham, 
formerly of Quincy, 
unexpectedly in Palm Beach, 
Fla. , Jan. 14. 

Mrs. Noreen E. I Corcoran j 
Farren, 54, of Bourne, formerly 
of Quincy, at the Tobey 
Memorial Hospital in Wareham, 
Jan. 14. 

Mrs. Louisa flntroini/ 
Palazzi, 81, of 92 Rogers St., at 
the Quincy City Hospital, Jan. 
15. 

Miss Fuphemia I. Cheverie, 
74, of 346 Bridge St., No. 
Weymouth, formerly of Quincy, 
at the Peter Bent Brigham 
Hospital, Boston, Jan. 15. 

Miss Katharine I. Kennedy, of 
195 Upland Rd, at University 
Hospital, Boston, Jan. 15. 

Mrs. Lilly M. fMalmberg/ 
Lindgren of 285 Beak St., at a 
nursing home, Jan. 15. 



Mrs. Mary / McLaughlin / 
Theall, 69, of 233 Atlantic St., 
at Quincy City Hospital, Jan. 15. 

Santino A. Gaudiano, 70, of 
30 Ames St., at Quincy City 
Hospital, Jan. 16. 

Miss Mary A. Lambert, 77, of 
95 Martensen St., unexpectedly 
at Quincy City Hospital, Jan. 1 6. 

Mrs. Celia / EstabrookJ 
Milton, 88, of 40 Virginia Rd, at 
Quincy City Hospital, Jan. 16. 

Melvin A. MacFarland, 66, of 
1000 Southern Artery, 
unexpectedly at his home, Jan. 
16. 



Thomas E. Mulvaney, 
formerly of Sterling St., at the 
Colonial Nursing Home in 
Weymouth, Jan. 16. 

John B. Walsh, 65, of 176 
President's Lane, unexpectedly 
at Quincy City Hospital, Jan. 1 7. 

Paul V. Lindenflezer Jr., 37, 
of 22 Green view St., at his 
home, Jan. 1 7. 



Vernon L. Tilden, 79, of 2 12 
Blue Rock Rd, South Yarmouth, 
formerly of Quincy, at the 
Re st haven Nursing Home in 
Hyannis, Jan. 1 7. 



William McCulloch, 57, of 
160 Water St., at Quincy City 
Hospital, Jan. 1 7. 

William S. Connell, 82, of 
1000 Southern Artery, at a local 
nursing home, Jan. 1 7. 

Mrs. Julia I Foley j Brinkert, 
60, of 22 Putnam St., at Quincy 
City Hospital, Jan. 1 7. 

James H. Rolgers Sr., 78, of 
21 Pi Hon Rd, East Milton, 
formerly of Quincy, at Quincy 
City Hospital, Jan. 18. 



Wallace M. Kemp, 76, of 662 
Main St., No. Hanover, formerly 
of Quincy, at his home, Jan. 18. 

Michael Gramazio, 90, of 11 
Chestnut St., Kingston, formerly 
of Quincy, unexpectedly at his 
home, Jan. 18. 

Mrs. Florence L . 
(MacDonald/ McSweeney of 
Bicknell St., at Carney Hospital, 
Dorchester, Jan. 18. 

John W. MacDonald, 86, of 
436 Sea St., unexpectedly at 
Quincy City Hospital, Jan. 18. 



Mrs. Elizabeth J. /NixonJ 
Douce tte, 83, of 60 Albatross 
Rd, at the Braintree Manor 
nursing home, Jan. 18. 



Wickens and Troupe 




Transported©" f Of 
Af Stmcfs 



FUNERAL HOME 

f*mtm •» M **•*• |mm lt» 

MECIOtS 

OwftMH WMMM 

tefwO NmmI 

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MAMMSST.OUMCY 

472-5888 




74ELMSTREET-QUINCY 



326 COPELAND STREET 
W. QUINCY 



WAfCTO* 



M. JOSEPH SWEENEY 
Telephone 773-2721 



Miss Elizabeth M. 
Reifenberger, 86, of 25 Edison 
St., unexpectedly at Quincy City 
Hospital, Jan. 18. 

Miss Lois J. MacLaren, 36, of 
7 Belmont St., at Quincy City 
Hospital, Jan. 19. 



Dr. Carl H. Leander, 74, of 
145 WhitwellSt., at Quincy City 
Hospital, Jan. 19. 

Mrs. Carol F. /Smith/ Bowie, 
46, of 31 Sedgewick Dr., 
Scituate, formerly of Quincy, at 
South Shore Hospital, 
Weymouth, Jan. 19. 



Jean K. Allgorin, 84, of 3718 
Coconut Dr., Lake Worth, Fla., 
formerly of Quincy, at the John 
F. Kennedy Memorial Hospital 
in Atlantis, Jan. 19. 

Thomas A. Leonard, 62, of 
Duxbury, formerly of Quincy, at 
University Hospital, Boston, Jan. 
19. 



Mrs. Leilah J. [Pasardi/ 
Troccoli, 57, of 90 Henry St., at 
Quincy City Hospital, Jan. 19. 

Mrs. Esther A. /Colin/ 
Johnson, 84, of Duxbury, 
formerly of Quincy, at a 
Plymouth nursing home, Jan. 
19. 

Gerald Marinelli, 82,- of 26 
Hughes St., at his home, Jan. 20. 



Albert F. Schleyer, 66, of 91 
Clapp Rd, No. Scituate, 
formerly of Quincy, at his home, 
Jan. 20. 

Frederick Y. Wells, 43, of 64 
Arnold St., unexpectedly at his 
home, Jan. 20. 



Albert D. Swanson, 75, of 18 
No. Payne St., unexpectedly at 
Quincy City Hospital, Jan. 21. 

Ernest J. Rivard, 71, of 1000 
Southern Artery, at Quincy City 
Hospital, Jan. 21. 



MEMORIAL GIFTS 



EVERYTHING THAT IS 
WORTHWHILE & 
APPRECIATED BY 
YOUR CHURCH 



A. E GOODHUE CO. 

VESTMENT MANUFACTURERS 
500 IN STOCK 

1 T 63 HANCOCK ST 

OUINCY - 472-3090 



A budget of $81,057 for 
church expenses and $12,175 
for benevolences totalling 
$93,232 was adopted for the 
present year by members of 
Bethany Congregational Church, 
Quincy Center, at the annual 
meeting Jan. 17. 

The benevolence account 
includes: 

$1,500 for The Way, a 
religious center for youth in 
Quincy. 

$1,000, for the Protestant 
Social Service Bureau of the 
South Shore. 

$500 to the Columbia Point 
Christian Center. 

$400 to the Boston City 
Missionary Society and to the 
South Shore Council of 
Churches. 

$250 for Youth Evangelism. 

The congregation will give 
$4,05 for Christian World 
Missions; $1,900 to the 
Massachusetts Conference, 
United Church of Christ; and 
$555 to the Metropolitan 
Boston Association of the 
U.C.C. 

Membership stands at 923. 

Moderator Miss Louise B. 
Forsyth, re-elected to a second 
term, presided at the session 
which followed a dessert social 
hour arranged by members of 
the Bethany Women's Union. 

A memorial service in 
recognition of the 14 church 
members who died in 1972 was 
led by Rev. John D. Banks, 
pastor. 

In his annual report, Rev. Mr. 
Banks quoted from the words of 
Harry Emerson Fosdick: 

"Grant us wisdom, .grant us 
courage, for the facing of this 
hour", and said that the words 
of the hymn come to us with 
prayerful seriousness, for these 
are increasingly difficult days for 
all churches. 

"We are part of the 
'establishment' and people who 
really do not know much about 
us automatically presume that 
the church is passe. Like the 
Athenians of Paul's time, 'telling 
or hearing something new' 
makes everything old 
'irrelevant'. But there is evidence 
that discerning souls are again 
starting to dig for 'living water' 
.in the wells of their fathers. I 
venture the prophecy that the 
70's will be a time for revival of 
Christianity, Bethany should be 
a channel for the Pentecostal 
fires." 

Rev. Arthur R. Curtis, 
associate minister, reported on 
the Christian education activities 
of the church and urged the 
parishioners to develop again the 
"cluster groups" where people 
can meet in small numbers to see 
what the Gospel can do for their 
lives. 

The budget reports were 
given by William L. Lipp, 
Chairman of the Finance 
Committee, and Miss Bernice M. 
Reed, Chairman of the 
Missionary Committee. 

Elected, following acceptance 
of the Nominating Committee 
report were: 

Miss Louise B. Forsyth, 
Moderator; Mrs. Alexander B.' 
Smart, clerk; Miss Mildred G 
DeBoer, assistant clerk; Thomas 
E. Roberts, treasurer; Miss 
Gloria Morgan, assistant 
treasurer. 




Quincy Memorial 

is your guarantee of a ... 



Quality Memorial 

Quality qj a low cost. 

218 Willard Street 
West Quincy, Moss. 

911 Adams St. 
Dorchester, Mass. 02124 

TeL 471-0250 



Also Mrs. Milton E. Kelsey, 
financial secretary; Robert j! 
Caliri, collector; Merton Pomfret 
and Robert Penniman, assistant 
collectors; Carl A. Bohlken Jr., 
auditor. 

Named to the Administrative 
Committee were Walter A. 
Schmitz, H. Winslow Bettinson, 
Bruce Harrison and Miss Carol 
Bodnar. The Moderator, Miss 
Forsyth, announced as her 
appointments Mrs. Donald E. 
Kent and David S. Carr. 

Elected Deacons were Robert 
L. Lockwood, Carl A. Bohlken 
Jr., Clifford W. Evers and Bruce 
J. Byorkman. 

Deaconesses elected are Mrs. 
Robert Nordstrom Jr., Miss J. L. 
Marion Nilsen, Mrs. Harry 
Byorkman, Miss Sharyn G. 
Gifford, and Miss Cheryl J. 
Bodnar. 

Other 'committee members 
elected are : 

Prudential Committee - 
Henry F. Nilsen, Robert 
Nofdstrom Jr., James Rendle, 
Mrs. Edward Egan and Bruce A. 
Wheeler; Finance Committee - 
Robert W. McLain, Raymond W. 
Morse, Miss Charlene R. Benson, 
William L. Lipp, Miss Annie 
Cumming. 

Beautification Committee - 
Miss Edith 1. Gibson; 
Endowment Committee, Carlyle 
W. Jacob, Mrs. Robert W. 
McLain; Christian Education 
Committee, Miss Donna Zanolli, 
Mrs. Helen Mavreles, Mrs. Bruce 
G. Crofts, Miss Susan L. Green; 
Music Committee, Mrs. Arthur 
R. Curtis, Mrs. Robert J. Caliri, 
Miss Mary Lou Glaman, Miss 
Leila Hunt, Mrs. John Krasinski, 
Stephen H. Byorkman. 

Social Action Committee - 
Miss Maude F. Wheeler, Mrs. A. 
Paul Gossard, Mrs. W. Robert 
Kilbourn, Miss Denise Paterson, 
Miss Barbara Ferguson; 
Missionary Committee, Mrs. 
John Murphy, Miss Bernice 
Reed, Edward Arslan, Miss 
Eileen Darrow, Miss Martha J. 
Newton. 

Delegates to the state and 
Boston conferences of the 
United Church of Christ will be 
Mr. and Mrs. Clayton Simpson 
and Mr. and Mrs. Carlyle W. 
Jacob. Alternates named include 
Miss Marion B. Reinhardt, Miss 
Janet Hass^er and Mrs. Arthur R. 
Curtis. 

Head usher is William R. 
Mew is assisted by Donald E. 
Wheeler. Designated ushers were 
Charles B. Allen, William Best, 
Albert C. Riddick, Bruce A. 
Wheeler, Dana W. Bettinson, 
Stephen H. Byorkman, Bruce G. 
Crofts, Carl Bohlken Jr., Bruce 
C. Riddick, Robert W. McLain, 
Clayton E. Simpson, Douglas 
Gordon, Robert Nordstrom, 
Jeffrey Kent, Russell Newton. 

Tellers include: Gilbert I. 
Fitzgerald, Charles F. Hartford, 
Charles R. Irving, Donald E. 
Kent, John E. Krasinski, 
Nathaniel H. Ladd, William L. 
Lipp, Albert C. Riddick, Walter 
A. Schmitz, Donald Sargent, 
John R. Marshall, George Zeiba. 

Robert W. McLain, chairman 
of the Nominating Committee, 
submitted the slate of officers 
and committee members. Other 
members of the committee were 
. Mrs. Hugh J. MacFarlane, Mrs. 
Bruce G. Crofts, Mrs. Carl E. 
Siddens, Miss Donna Zanolli, 
Cla'ence L. Edwards and Bruce 
G. Crofts. 



| 
Y 



ROY'S FLOWfftS 

H W ASHUWT0U ST 
«MMCY 

471- 




>W" >«ii » i» w i y. 



Thursday, January 25, 1973 Quincy Sun Page 9 

— —— — ~— i i 



OUINCY JUNIOR COLLEGE 

A DIVISION OF THE QUINCY PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

SPRING SCHEDULE 1973 




Division Off Continuing Education 



EC 202 
EN 102 
FR 102 
LA 202 
PS 101 
PS 202 
PY102 
SS245 
SP202 

AC 202 
EC 102 
ECE 101 
EN 212 
EN 101 
FA 201 
MA 102 
SO 202 



SS 111 

SS112 
SS103 

SS104 
SS235 

Bl 102 
Bl 104 

ED 101 
EN 102 
EN 111 
FR202 
GT212 
HI 102 
PS 101 
PS 201 
SP102 



EVENING DIVISION 




Credit 


MONDAY -6:30-9: 10 P.M. 




Hours 


Principle of Economics II 




3 


English Composition II 




3 


Elementary French II 




3 


Business Law 




3 


General Psychology 




3 


Child Psychology 




3 


Principles of Physical Science 




3 


Business Communications 




3 


Intermediate Spanish 1 




3 


TUESDAY -6:30 9: 10 P.M. 






Intermediate Accounting II 




3 


American Economic History 




3 


Introduction to Early Childhood Education 


3 


American Literature 




3 


English Composition 1 




3 


Survey of Fine Arts 




3 


College Mathematics II 




3 


Contemporary Social Problems 




3 


TUESDAY & THURSDAY 


6:00-8:00 P.M. 


Shorthand 1 




3 


Shorthand II 




3 


Typewriting 1 




2 


TUESDAY & THURSDAY 


8:00-9:45 P.M. 


Typewriting II 




2 


Secretarial Procedures 




2 



AC 101 
AC 102 
EN 202 
EN 102 
FA 203 
HI 112 
MK202 
SO 101 
LE151 



WEDNESDAY - 6:30 9: 10 P.M. 

General Biology II [Lab.Mon. 6:30-8:30 PM] 

Anatomy and Physiology II 
[Lab. Mon. 6:30-8:30 P.M.] 

Learning Disabilities of the Adolescent 

English Composition II 

Effective Speaking 

Intermediate French I 

International Relations 

United States History 

General Psychology 

Child Psychology 

Elementary Spanish II 

THURSDAY 6:30 9: 10 P.M. 

Fundamentals of Accounting I 

Fundamentals of Accounting II 

English Literature II 

English Composition II 

Music Appreciation 

History of Western Civilization 

Principles of Marketing 

General Sociology 

Social Health Issues - Law Enforcement 



TUITION 



Registration fee $ 2.00 

Tuition per credit [Quincy resident .... 19.00 

Tuition per credit [ non-resident) 22.00 

Laboratory fee [Biology] 10.00 



COMMUNITY EDUCATIONAL 




SERVICES 






Community Services [non-credit] courses are open to any person who 




feels that he may profit from them. This credit-free approach to 




learning makes it possible for one to continue to learn in an informal 




and non-competitive environment where learning is 


the only interest. 




AT QUINCY JUNIOR COLLEGE 


Number t Tuition 

Of Weeks 


MONDAYS -7:00 9:00 P.M. 






Creative Writing 


10 


E 


Illustrated Course on Antiques [7:00-8:30 P.M.] 


10 


B 


Dynamics of Human Behavior 


10 


B 


Effective Supervision 


10 


E 


TUESDAY 7:00 900 P.M. 






j * Advanced Algebra 1 


10 


B 


English for Everyday Speech and Writing 


10 


B 


Preparation of Income Tax Returns 


10 


C 


WEDNESDAY 7:00 9:00 P.M. 






Career Guidance for the Mature Woman 


10 


C 


Personnel Management 


10 


E 


Basic Mathematics Review 


12 


B 


4 A Feminist Look at Women's Fiction 


10 


B 


* Basic Photography 


10 


F 


THURSDAY 7:00 9:00 P.M. 






Fundamentals of Investment in Stocks and Bonds 


10 


A 


Law for the Layman 


10 


B 


Basic Drawing 


10 


F 


* Conversational French 


10 


C 


AT NORTH QUINCY HIGH SCHOOL 






MONDAY -7:00 9:00 P.M. 






Algebra 1 [M&W! - [1 H.S. Unit] 


10 


E 


Principles of Bookkeeping II 


12 


C 


Conversational Italian II 


11 


C 


Effective Reading [A] 


12 


B 



Successful Real Estate Practices 
Shorthand - Beginners II 
Shorthand - Refresher 
Typing - Beginners II 

WEDNESDAY 7:00 9:00 P.M. 

Algebra I [M&W] 

Principles of Bookkeeping I 

Conversational Italian I 

Effective Reading [B] 

Real Estate - Preparation for the Brokers' Exam 

Typing - Beginners I 

Typing - Refresher 

Shorthand Beginners I 



10 
12 
12 
12 

10 
10 
11 
12 
10 
12 
12 
12 



AT QUINCY VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL SCHOOL 
From 7:00-9:00 P.M. 

[W] Introduction to Data Processing 12 

[M] Introduction to Business Programming 12 

[T] Cobol Programming J 2 

* A new course offering 

+ TUITION SCHEDULE 

A-$I6 Non-Residents 520 

B-SI8 Non-Residents $22 

C - $20 Non-Residents $25 

D - $25 Non-Residents $30 

E - $28 Non-Residents $32 



F 
D 
B 
C 

E 
B 
C 
B 
F 
B 
B 
B 



J 

( 



II 



D 
D 
D 



F - $30 Non-Residents $35 

REGISTRATION: «*w*»f« * ■ 

MONDAY, JAN. 29 TUESDAY, JAN. 30 WEDNESDAY, JAN. 31 

TIME: 9 A.M. - 4 P.M. - 6:30 P.M. - 9 P.M. 

Write or Call: Quincy Junior College, 34 Coddington St., Quincy 471-2470 



Page 10 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 25, 1973 



North Quincy High School NEWS 



Written by itaff members of The North Star and other North student) 



An Editorial 



Does The Kennedy 
Legend Still Exist? ? 

ByPAULGOSLIN 

In the state of Massachusetts anyone named Kennedy seems to 
evoke a reaction of love and admiration. He is part of a long and 
famous legend in Massachusetts politics. Senator Edward 
Kennedy is the last bearer of this standard. He came to North 
Quincy High School on Friday Jan. 12, and the legend stood 
before many of us for the first time. 

If the legend does exist, it showed its outward appearances 
here. When Senator Kennedy entered the gymnasium the students 
present rose to their feet to greet him. This reaction is one not 
common to high school students. As a matter of fact I've never 
seen anyone receive this type of greeting here at North. 

The Senator walked in amongst the local politicians. He stood 
apart from Quincy's politicians. His carriage showed why he was 
where he was, as Senator from Massachusetts. 

The Senator took the crowd of students and turned them on 
to his thoughts and ideas. He actually listened to them. The 
students in turn took up the challenge to make themselves heard. 
They made their feelings known on the war, amnesty, drugs, and 
violence in the streets. Through it all the Senator listened and 
made his feelings known on each. 

He was as cool as ice. He joked with photographers and others 
so intent on helping him out in what they thought of as a "jam". 
The students ate it up. 

When he left, again the students rose. They rose in tribute to 
the legend. A legend passed on from our parents to the students 
of today. 

John F. Kennedy's "New Frontier" is alive in his brother. It 
still has the same aura of greatness it had in the early 60\s now in 
the 70's. 

This Page Is A New Feature For Quincy Sun Readers. 
Articles Are Written by North Quincy Students and Quincy High 

Students On Alternating Weeks 



Bare Necessity: Space 

Students, Officials, Others United On 
New School, Or 'Massive Overhaul 9 



By LISA McELANE Y 

Sometimes, as an associate 
member of the Quincy School 
Committee, and one who is 
relatively active in local affairs, I 
become extremely frustrated in 
dealing with the bureaucracies 
that are supposedly necessary in 
order to progress. 

Of course this feeling is not 
uncommon to most student 
activists who feel their opinions 
are taken tokenisticly. 

One very encouraging 
exception to this rule of student 
frustration occurred on the night 
of Jan. 17. It was on this night 
that the school committee met 
with five members of the Quincy 
Student Union to discuss a 
student - chosen topic, the 
North Quincy High School 
accreditation report. 

The meeting was well 
attended and extremely spirited 
and I left the meeting convinced 
that everyone; School 
Committee, students, school 
faculty and administration and 
much of the community are 
united in asking for a new 
facility, or at least a massive, and 
I emphasize "massive", overhaul 
of the existing structure. 

Prior to the meeting, I felt 
that the effort would be a lesson 
in futility; that the research we 
students did and the reports 
given by our department heads, 
would mean nothing. I was 




STUUfcNT UNIUN representative Lisa McElaney and School 
Committee Members Daniel Raymondi and Francis X. McCauley at 
discussion of North Quincy High School accreditation report and 
proposed new high school facility. 

[Steven Bailey Photo] 
pessimistic because I realize that suggestions. 



the school committee has done 
everything in its power to 
attempt to find a permanent 
solution to the serious 
overcrowding and lack of proper 
facilities at North. 

The issue had passed from the 
hands of the School Committee 
to those of the City Council long 
ago. The honorable council has 
two suggested sites under its 
consideration. If these are 
deemed unacceptable, our 
superintendent has assured us 
that there are alternative 



However, time is all too 
valuable, it holds in its grasp the 
future of many present students 
and prospective students at 
North. 

While these two proposals 
remain locked in some obscure 
sub-committee of the City 
Council, students are being 
cheated out of many worthwhile 
experiences that should exist in 
any high school i.e. athletic 
playing fields, an efficient and 
expanded library and the very 
bare necessity: SPACE. 



Drama Club A Hit With 'Nobody Sleeps', 10 TV Spoofs 



By PAUL GOSLIN 

The Drama Club at North 
Quincy High School played its 
first production of the year Jan 
17 and 18. 

The production entailed the 
one act play "Nobody Sleeps" 
and 10 spoofs written by 
students Jim McCarthy and Joe 
Carroll. 

"Nobody Sleeps" was a short 



story about a robber discovered 
robbing a house owned by a 
mystery writer and her 
daughters. The girls drive the 
robber crazy with their incessant 
chatter and curiosity. 

The robber, Spike, played by 
Kevin Verronneau finally breaks 
down and admits that he is a 
failure and supports his nagging 
wife by an early morning paper 



route. The girls were played by 
Mary Poole, Beverly Dunn and 
Andrea Vento. Their mother was 
played by Robin Koretsky. Tom 
Goslin directed. 

A group of 1 spoofs written 
by Jim McCarthy and Joe 
Carroll were presented. They 
concentrated on the old idiot 
box and all the stupidity it 
emanates daily. Getting 



everything from commercials to 
TV gameshows the "writers had 
plenty of grist for their writing 
mills. The spoofs were witty and 
well portrayed. Jim McCarthy 
directed. 

Miss Ellen Byrne is the drama 
coach at North. She can be 
proud of her performers. 



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Saturduy* 9:00 to 5:30 



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Monday - Saturday 9 to S;30, Thursday ft, Friday Eves to 9 P.M. 



Thursday, January 25, 1973 Quincy Sun Page 1 1 



Addresses Juniors , Seniors 

Senator Kennedy Stresses 
Importance Of 'Getting Involved 5 



By jim McCarthy 

Friday, Jan. 12, at 
approximately 8:45 a.m., 
Senator Edward Kennedy came 
to North, to address the Juniors 
and Seniors of the school and 
seek student opinion regarding 
various issues. 

He began his talk by 
commending youth participation 
in politics and the positive 
results our efforts achieve. He 
stressed the importance of 
"getting invr'ved" and sighted 
examples of special interest 
groups which he feels are "Well 
represented" on the political 
spectrum. Groups such as those 
who oppose the war, inflation, 
and unnecessary waste of the 
taxpayer's money. 

Senator Kennedy then 
changed his format and began 
asking questions of the students. 
He sought their opinions to 
issues such as redirecting 
priorities, the justification of the 
Christmas bombing, the death 
penalty, the amnesty question, 
and whether or not it's more 
important to institute stricter 
drug laws or provide 
rehabilitation to addicts. 

Finally, he gave individual 
students the opportunity to ask 
him questions in an open forum 
type format. 

Bob Sheridan questioned the 
Senator's belief in unconditional 
amnesty. He argues that those 
who have refused to serve in the 
armed forces have sacrificed 
nothing for their nation, while 
many of those who have served 
have made the supreme sacrifice. 

Senator Kennedy defended 
his position by reminding Bob of 
those who are exempted from 
their supposed military 
obligation due to college or job. 
He rationalized that just because 
someone is financially well off 
and is able to attend college, is 
this any more of a justification 
for him to stay out of the armed 
forces than the fact that he may 
feel the war is morally wrong. 
"We shouldn't punish those who 
stand up for their moral 
convictions, for this would stifle 




SENATOR Edward M. Kennedy 
School students. 

the very principal on which this 
nation was founded," he said. If 
it were not for men who were 
bold enough to oppose things 
they truly believe to be wrong, 
the United States would never 
have been conceived. 

Next, the question of Lt. 
Calley arose. Senator Kennedy 
seemed to feel that this entire 
controversy should never be. 
Though such an act as Galley's 
was intolerable, it will gain us 
nothing to use him as a 
scapegoat, he said. 

Another student asked what 
was being done about the 
growing wave of crime and 
violence. Though the Senator 
indicated several inherent law 
enforcement reforms, he also 



addresses North Quincy High 

made the point perfectly clear 
that the attitude of the people is 
just as essential to deter this 
problem. He indicated the 
tragedy of apathy on behalf of 
those who refuse to get involved. 
The final question asked of 
Senator Kennedy was from Lisa 
McHlaney. She inquired as to the 
current Congressional effort to 
terminate the war. Kennedy's 
reply was one we've been 
hearing quite a bit of lately, and 
that is Congress may stop 
appropriating funds for the war. 
He also reiterated that the 
resistance of the masses to the 
war is still important. 

The entire affair proceeded 
commendably well. 
Congratulations to those 
responsible. 



30 Coeds Playing Ice Hockey At North 



By KEN SHINE 

The newly formed North 
Quincy Girl's Hockey team is off 
to an excellent start, with a 
nucleus of approximately 30 
enthusiastic coeds. 

The girls play at Shea Rink in 
West Quincy every Wednesday 
afternoon from 4 to 5 p.m. 

The girls have no financial 
support at all. Thus they are 
forced to provide their own 
transportation to and from the 
rink, hockey sticks, pads, gloves, 
sweaters, and the use of the rink. 

Each girl is selected to play 
on one of the teams that have 
been chosen. Regular games are 
held between the two teams 
with hope of inter-scholastic 
competition in the near future. 

Coach Robert Troup, a 
history teacher at NQHS, feels 
that the girls hockey games are 
more exciting to watch than the 
boys, because there is a different 
atmosphere among the players. 
The boys are more interested in 
winning while the girls are just 
out to have a good time. 

In the most recent game the 
Black Raiders edged the Red 
Raiders, 4 to 1. Betty Sullivan 
netted three goals for the 
winning Black Raiders. 

The teams to date are 



Red Raiders. Donna Valenti, 
Cathy Andrews, Elaine Murphy, 
Cheryl Doherty, Judy Phipps, 
Ellen Santry, Nancy Lang, Joyce 
Coleman, Helen Thompson, 
Mary Ellen Troy, Carol Veasy, 
Marie Welch, Lauren Welch, 
Lauren Snook, Karen Conley 
and Janet Vickers. 

The Black Raiders: Wendy 
Huke, Gail Doherty, Nancy 
Flynn, Susan Dyer, Beth 
Lagadimos, Terry Fitzgerald, 
Nancy Willard, Dianne 
Giorgette, Betty Sullivan, Linda 
Schmidtke, Kathy Hughes, 
Kathy McLaughlin, Chris Bonoli, 



Janie Chetynd, Colleen Kelliher 
and Cheryl Walsh. 



Lionel Trains 

new & used 

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423 Hancock St. 
Quincy 

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CHEVROLET 

Sales and Service 
for over 50 years 

New and Used Cars 





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North Quincy Garage 

133 Hancock St. 

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'Have You Heard?' 



PATRICIA MATHIESON - 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert 
E. Mathieson, of 147 Fenno St., 

Wollaston, has received her 
acceptance at the Quincy City 
Hospital School of Nursing. 

After she obtains her R.N., she 
plans on specializing in medical 

surgical nursing. Patricia was a 
cheerleader at North for two 
years and is in the Girls Club and 
Spirit Committee. 



JO ANN GRAZIO of 74 East 
Elm Ave., Wollaston, daughter 
of Mr. Joseph Grazio and Mrs. 
James Young, has been accepted 
to Weaver Airline Personnel 
School. She plans to be a 
reservationist. Jo Ann comes 
from a family of four and has 
lived in Quincy all her life. 
Jo Ann enjoys travelling and 
music. She has been active in 
student government and various 
club organization's throughout 
her Junior High and High School 
years. 



at Thomas Crane Public Library 




Do yon know Peter Hatcher 
and Ozzie Hinkle? Who're Carrie, 

Sam and Anna? Is Sinai! Wolf an 
animal? Are George and Martha 
people? If youngsters can answer 
these questions, they've done a 
lot of good reading during l l >72. 
If they can't answer, then 
they've missed some of last 
year's most colorful characters. 

Peter Hatcher, nine years old, 
has given in to his baby brother. 
Fudge, in TALKS OF A 
FOURTH GRADE NOTHING 
by Judy Blume. The battle 
between the two boys takes 
place in a New York City 
apartment, and baby brother's 
antics-like swallowing Peter's 
turtle-are pretty hard to beat. 
Peter's story has some good tips 
on brother-handling and some 
very lunny scenes. 

With a name like Ozzie 
Hinkle it has to be funny. And it 
is in THK BIG JOKK GAMK by 
Scott Corbett. Ozzie likes jokes 
and games so much that he 
finally falls right into one in 
which a guardian devil takes him 
through all kinds of hazards like 
puns, limericks and riddles. 

SMALL WOLF isn't an 
animal. It's an Indian boy's 
name and the title of an 
l-Can-Read book by Nathaniel 
Benchley. Small Wolf goes to the 
Island of Hills to hunt, but 
instead of bears and foxes, deer 
and moose, he finds white men. 
So Small Wolf's band must move 
away from their hunting 
grounds.. .again and again and 
again. 

George and Martha are 
animals, not people! They're 
friends, hippo friends, who share 
five stories of friendship with 
the picture book age child. 
There are stories about George 
and pea soup and George and 
roller skates, Martha in a 
bathtub and Martha in a mirror. 
The pictures are just as 
humorous as the stories. 

Carrie, Sara and Anna are 
three quite different heroines in 
three very different stories. 
Carrie stars in UP THK P1KR by 
Helen Cresswell, a fantasy in 
which Carrie meets the 
Pontifexes, a family that has 



Between 
the Covers 



been spoiled from their world ol 
l l )2l into l ( >7l and want to go 
back. 

Sara is Sara May berry of ML 
AND FAT GLKNDA by L.ila 
Perl. Sara is very normal despite 
her weird parents. But she's 
lonely, until she meets Glenda 
who's fat, really fat, and even 
lonelier. A lively combination of 
life styles, loneliness and laughs. 



WHEN HITLER STOLE 
PINK RABBIT by Judith Kerr is 
Anna's story. Anna is nine years 
old, living in Germany in |93'3, 
and Jewish. All too quickly 
Anna and her family are forced 
to flee from Nazism. As Anna 
moves from her home in Berlin 
to Switzerland, then to France, 
then to England, she writes 
poems about disasters, has 
nightmares, tries, to adjust to 
homelessness, and misses her 
pink rabbit. 

There are so many more 
characters to meet in I V73. 
There's the friendly mutt in 
DOMINIC by William Steig who 
sets off along the highroad and, 
amid new friends and 
a d v e n t u r e s , m e e t s a 
witch-alligator, the Doomsday 
Gang, and an invalid pig. 

You might prefer to meet Mr. 
Fast in THE GHOST 
DOWNSTAIRS, about a man 
who was willing to trade seven 
years of his life for a million 
dollars. This is another story of 
mystery and the supernatural by 
Leon Garfield. 

Thin there are the 
Herd man's— Ralph, Imogene, 
Claude. Ollie and Gladys-real 
horrors, that reign over all the 
kids in the public school with 
pinches and punches, threats and 
thumps. And these are the kids 
that take over the Sunday 
School pageant in-Barhara 
Robinson's THE BfcST 
CHRISTMAS PAGEANT WE 
EVER HAD. 

And don't forget to look up 
old friends like Obadiah, Old 
Mother Hubbard, Grace Jones, 
the Great Brain, Sheila the 
Great... 

JANE GRANSTROM 



Supervisor of Children's Services 



•« ll l» l« 



Page 12 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 25, 1973 




Cow * tit/a/ms Jaycees 

•••••••> NATION AL JAYCEE WEEK {gg / JAN. 21 - 27 

/ V" — • Y - 




Women, Teenagers Eligible 



Quincy Jaycees 23 Years 
Old, And Very Active 



What's new with the Quincy 
Jaycees on their 23rd birthday? 

Well, for one thing, there's 
women. 

And, tor another, there's 
teenagers. 

For the first time, women are 
eligible to join what was once a 
bastion of youthful male 
solidarity. 

The way was cleared for the 
ladies when they won a couple 
of law suits against Jaycee 
chapters elsewhere in the United 
States. 

As yet, the Quincy chapter 
has no female members. 

"But," says Chapter President 
Charles J. Leonard, "if any 
woman wants to join, we 
certainly have no objections." 

Teen-agers were made eligible 
by the Jaycees National 
Convention when it reduced the 
minimum age from 21 to 18. 

Again, Quincy has no 
teen-aged members but the 
chapter is looking for them. 

"We feel that people who are 
18 are socially responsible and 
able to be active in our type of 
organization," says Leonard. 

The next chapter recruiting 
drive is to be aimed at Quincy 
Junior College and Eastern 
Nazarene. 

"Out of town students can 
join the Jaycees in Quincy 
during the school year and their 
hometown chapters when they 
are not in school," says Leonard. 

The current active 
membership qf the Quincy 



chapter is 28, which is small for 
a city the size of Quincy in 
which 12 per cent of the 
population is of Jaycee age. But 
the 28 are very active. 

This being Massachusetts 
Jaycee Week by official 
proclamation of Gov. Francis W. 
Sargent, Leonard sat down the 
other day and ticked off some of 
the accomplishments of the 
Quincy Chapter over the past 
year. 

The Jaycees participated in 
last July's Sidewalk Bazaar in 
downtown Quincy, raffling off 
tickets on a 10-speed bicycle 
with the proceeds going to send 
mentally retarded youngsters to 
a special Olympic meet in Los 
Angeles. 

The chapter also 
co-sponsored [with the Quincy 
school recreation department] a 
special Olympic meet for the 
retarded at Quincy Veterans 
Memorial Stadium. 

In October, members 
observed "Help Light the Way 
Sunday" by getting out and 
selling candles made by the 
mentally retarded in their 
Nauset workshop on Cape Cod. 

The proceeds of that sale 
went into the Mental Health 
Trust Fund, the chairman of 
which is Michael Daley of 
Daley-Care Management Co., 
nursing home. 

The chapter passed up a 
chance to enter a float in the 
Santa Parade in November in 
favor of selling taffy apples from 




JAYCEES WEEK is proclaimed by Quincy Mayor Walter J. Hannon as he presents a copy of the 
proclamation to Charles J. Leonard [right] , president of the Quincy Jaycees, and John Keeney, 
chairman of Jaycee Week. The proclamation recognizes that "this organization of young men has 
contributed tremendously to the betterment of this community throughout the year." 

[Quincy Sun Photo] 



a push cart along the parade 
route. 

There was also a change in 
the Christmas project. 

Instead of selling Christmas 
trees on Southern Artery, as in 
the past, the Jaycees raffled off 
"a case of cheer", raising $875 
to provide turkey dinners for 
100 needy families. 

Members of the Quincy 
chapter will be at the District 
Three meeting tonight 



Quincy 






:*** 



i» ? 



m. 



M 



:*S.J 



w 



m 



« li 



#> 



■■■MMBMI 



>N* SALUTE YOU/, 



DEDICATED TO 
M0VIN6 FORWARD 

Your efforts have helped our town grow 
and prosper. Your ideas and ideals 
have set an example for the entire com- 
munity. We salute your exemplary 
achievements and take pride in your dedication. 

Hancock Bank 

14 Banking Offices Throughout the County 
7 In Quincy and the South Shore 




[Thursday) at 8 p.m. at the 
Viking Club in Braintree to 
discuss future projects. 
Among those projects are: 

• A seminar at state 
headquarters in Marlboro 
Saturday [Jan. 27] to take up 
the problem of venereal disease 
and how to make the public 
aware of it's dangers. 

• A "Lock it and Pocket" 
campaign to convince people to 
lock their cars and put the keys 
in their pockets in an effort to 
cut the high rate of auto theft. 

• A revival of efforts to 
establish a Red Ball program in 
which round red stickers are 
placed on the windows of 
children's bedrooms to show 
firefighters where they are in the 
event of fire. 



• A "Fabulous Fifties" party 
Feb. 9 at' the Fore River 
Clubhouse, featuring a nostalgic 
rock band of the period, with 
the proceeds going to 
community projects. 

• Early in February, the 
chapter will present a plaque to 
the police officer judged 
outstanding in the performance 
of his duty as part of its 
police/community relations 
project. 

Next Thursday [Feb. 1] the 
Quincy chapter will hold an 
orientation meeting at the 
Carlton House to explain the 
purpose of the Jaycee movement 
to potential new members - 
especially females and teenagers. 



HafsOfFfoYou. 



••• 



Quincy 



::S;:¥«S:fc.:¥:i 




Sears Roebuck 

1591 Hancock St. 
Quincy 



iMMMflMM 



mm 



PROCLAMATION 

WHEREAS, the civic bodies and service organizations of our 
community and the departments of the local government 
recognize the great service rendered to this community by the 
Quincy Jaycees, and 

WHEREAS, the United States Jaycees and its affiliated state 
and local organizations have set aside the week of January 22 
through January 26, 1973, to observe the founding of the Jaycees 
and to promote the activities of the Jaycees, and 

WHEREAS, this organization of young men has contributed 
tremendously to the betterment of this community throughout 
the year, 

NOW, THEREFORE, I, Walter J. Hannon, Mayor of the City 
of Quincy, do hereby proclaim the week of January 22 through 
January 26, 1973, as JAYCEE WEEK 

and urge all citizens of our community to give full consideration 
to the future services of the Jaycees. 

Walter J. Hannon, Mayor 

Jaycee Creed 

We believe . . . 

• That faith in God gives meaning and purpose to human life. 

* That brotherhood of man transcends the sovereignty of 
nations. 

•That economic justice can best be won by free men through 
free enterprise. 

•That government should be of laws rather than of men. 
•That earth's great treasure lies in human personality. 
•And that service to humanity is the best work of life. 



Thursday, January 25, 1973 Quincy Sun Page 13 




'JVAT/GAfAl JAYC££bVE£K* 



We Salute 



Quincy Jaycees 
For Their Leadership 



SOUTH SHORE 

Tsuvisiox t tmumi 



DeNicola Bros., Inc. 



1570 HANCOCK ST., QUINCY. 479-1350 



Jways one step ahead. 
That's your Jaycees. Giv- 
ing your community every- 
thing they've got. Their 
goal? Never-ending prog- 
ress in a world of constant 
changes. Are you proud? 
All year long I 

Colonial Federal^ 

Savings and 

Loan 

Assoc. 



15 Beach Street, 



Wollaston 




DIRECTORS of the Quincy Jaycees meet to lay plans for Jaycee Week activities. From the left are, 
Domenic Silvestro, external vice president; David Mercier, secretary; Charles Leonard, president; Walter 
Frisbee, treasurer; Edward MacQhinnie, internal vice president; arK j Robert Campbell, director. Missing 
from the Photo are Thomas Pelliter, Raymond Viers, Robert Austin and Donald Hughes, past president. 

[Quincy Sun Photo] 



In Quincy 
And 



ACROSS THE NATION 



JEM 



WORK FOR YOU 



Shipbuilders 
Co-operative 
Bank 

1 Granite Street, 
Quincy 







1517 Hancock St., Quincy 



Salutes the 
Jaycees Of Quincy 

for their outstanding 
civic endeavors 



\ 



.5 ! 

I 




% 



FOR*** 

A BETTER TOMORROW... 

wvcas 

of Quincy 

... the Young Men who Build 

They're young men of untiring energy. They're 

young men with ideas and ideals — and they put 

them to work for our community's well-being. 

When we think of progress — present 

and future — we think of our Jaycees. 



South Shore 
National Bank 







Page 14 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 25, 1973 



Jaycee Alumni Includes Nixon, Hannon, Burke 



Since founded in 1920, many 
of the most famous men in the 
world have been members of 
The Jaycees. 

Currently the most notable is 
Richard M. Nixon, the 37th 
President of the United States. 

Another president, John F. 



Kennedy, also was a member, as 
was Hubert Humphrey, former 
vice president and presidential 
candidate in 1968. 

Others include Nelson 
Rockefeller, Dr. Tom Dooley, 
Henry Ford II and Jack 
Nicklaus, who is a former Jaycee 



We Are Proud 
Of Our Quincy Jaycees 



JAYCEES 



Jaycees Lead the Way 
with Their 

Energy, 

Ideals and 

Efforts 

Frank's Deli And Sub Shop 

662 Hancock St., Wollaston 



golf champion. 

There are also Jaycee alumni 
scattered throughout the U.S. 
Congress and the nation's 
highest judicial and legal posts. 

Around Quincy, former 
Jaycees include: 

Mayor Walter J. Hannon, 
Executive Secretary Joseph P. 
Shea, Dist. Atty. George G. 
Burke, Atty. Richard W. Barry, 



We Commend You 
Quincy Jaycees 




avcees 



DEDICATED TO M0VIN6 FORWARD 



Arlcnc's Pastry Shop 
, 9 Beale St., Wollaston 



Wedding and Party Cakes Our Specialty 
• 472-4025 



Congratulations 

To 

Quincy 



JAYCEES 



\- 



Noble's 
Camera Shop 

680 Hancock St. 
Wollaston 



City Development Coordinator 
John J. Cheney. 

Former Mayor James R. 
Mclntyre; Robert M. Rosenberg, 
president of Dunkin Donuts; and 
Charles G. Petersen, president of 
Quincy Cooperative Bank. 

Photographer George 
Blackwell, Maurice [Mike] 
Grossman of L. Grossman's Sons 
[one of the founders of the 
Quincy chapter], William J. 
Griffin of Hancock Bank and 
Philip Lawrence, president of 
Colonial Federal Savings and 
Loan Association. 

Hannon, Burke, Mclntyre and 
Rosenberg were named in 1965 
among the "Outstanding Young 
Men of America". 

Currently there are more than 
325,000 Jaycees in the United 
States, with membership drawn 
from members of every race and 
creed and every walk of life. 

In Massachusetts, the Jaycees 
boast a membership of some 
5,000 with chapters in 126 
communities. 

Their activities cover a wide 
variety of fields including 
agriculture, education, 
government, health, safety, 
youth and international affairs. 





Lydon-Russell Funeral Home 



644 Hancock St. 
Wollaston 



We Salute 




Our Leaders Of Tomorrow 




Their Efforts 
Help Our City 
Grow, Prosper 



Dacey Brothers Dairy Stores 



263 Beale St. 
139 West Elm Ave. 



330 Washington St. 
213 Samoset Ave. 



Who Will 
Win 9th 
Award? 



The eighth annual 
Distinguished Service Award 
dinner is now being planned for 
the spring by the Quincy 
Jaycees. 

The award is in recognition of 
outstanding community service 
by an individual. 

Past winners were: 

1966 - Dr. Charles Djerf, 
Quincy pediatrician and former 
member of the School 
Committee. 

1967 - Rev. Bedros Baharian, 
pastor of Quincy Point 
Congregational Church. 

1968 - Dr. Edward Mann, 
former president of Eastern 
Nazarene College and former 
School Committee member. 

1969 - A. Wendell Clark, 
business leader and longtime 
member of the School 
Committee. 

1970 - Frank E. Remick, 
Quincy Center businessman and 
civic leader. . 

197 1 - John W. Blake, 
treasurer of Colony, Inc., 
fund-raising chairman for the 
Salvation Army and civic leader. 

1972 - William A. O'Connell, 
former executive vice president 
of the Quincy-South Shore 
Chamber of Commerce. 



Best Wishes 



From 



The 
Carlton House 

of Quincy 



29 Hancock St. 
North Quincy 

Meeting Place 

of The 
Quincy Jaycees 




We Salute Our Quincy Jaycees 

» 

Quincy Savings Bank 

1374 Hancock St., 
371 Hancock St., 138 Franklin St. 



Congratulations 
And Best Wishes 

Quincy 



jaycees! 



Jaycees Lead 
the Way 

Charles G. Peterson 




Lots Of Activity 
For 16,000 Seniors 



By PUTNAM S. BORDEN 
Executor Director 
Council On Aging 



There are more than 16,000 citizens of Quincy, aged 60 or 
older. For each, there is a city agency designed to provide 
information and assistance in meeting their special needs, The 
Quincy Council on Aging. 

Years ago, in the United States, and today, in 'Mess advanced" 
societies, age was synonymous with wisdom and respect. The 
elderly played an essential role in the home and the community, 
providing guidance and wise counsel; settling disputes and, in 
general, giving direction and purpose to community life. 

Unfortunately, advanced technology and social change have 
drastically altered the traditional role of the elderly in our 
society. 

In our "youth oriented" culture, it sometimes seems that there 
is no further place for those who have grown old creating what 
we enjoy today. At age 64, 364 days, an individual is a 
functioning member of the community. At age 65, we say. "we 
no longer need you, run along and enjoy your "retirement". 

The Quincy Council on Aging does not believe this nor does 
the City which provides for it's services. We believe that both our 
elderly and our community have mutual needs and have 
dedicated ourselves to serving as a catalyst and a focal point 
through which, these needs can be satisfied. 

What is available to you as a senior resident of this 
community? What existing services can the Quincy Council on 
Aging provide to you now? 

Through the Quincy Council on Aging, you, as a citizen aged 
60 or older may obtain: 

•Senior Citizen I.D. Cards - these cards entitle the bearer to 
participate in the special events offered by the Quincy Recreation 
Department, special sporting licenses for hunting, fishing and 
trapping [if over 70 years of age], reduced prices at certain 
theaters, reduced prices at a local bowling establishment, free 
admission to many school athletic events, participation in adult 
education programs at minimum charge, and trade discounts at 
some local business establishments. Most important, it permits 
joining one of the many Senior Citizens organizations and 
participating in their activities. 

• The Quincy Council on Aging sponsors daily, Monday 
through Friday, a Hot Lunch Program for Senior Citizens at the 
Sawyer Tower public housing complex located on Martensen St. 
A hot, nutritious meal can be obtained at a price of 50 cents. 
There is also an opportunity to meet new friends. 

• For many, particularly those who have been ill or are 
disabled, transportation is a major concern. The Council on Aging 
provides direct transportation to doctors, dentists, therapy, etc., 
for those who request it. In addition, the Council is active in 
arranging programs such as the recently initiated bus service 
between the three public housing complexes and the Stop and 
Shop Plaza at Southern Artery. 

• Job Placement - for many, the "joys of retirement" quickly 
become the deadly boredom of idleness. Yet, how does one go 
about seeking work when "everyone" wants the young. 

Your Council on Aging has established a job placement 
program for senior citizens because, contrary to appearances, 
many employers seek the maturity and responsibility which 
accrues with age. 

Our Job Developer, Mr. Edmund Ferry is located each day at 
the Mass. Division of Employment Security Office, 1433 
Hancock St., and his services, considered by many as the most 
effective in the state, are available to any senior citizen in the 
community. 

'• Information - to many, unanswered questions about services, 
programs, legal rights, etc., are a source of concern and 
frustration. The staff and Executive Director of the Council on 
Aging will welcome your questions and will try to find answers to 
them. 

These are the major activities currently conducted by your 
Council on Aging. At present, services are oriented toward you. 

Our future planning, which I shall write about later involves 
services which you as responsible citizens can provide to meet 
community needs. I am confident you will all respond. 



Seniors Shoppers Bus Schedule 



Following is the senior citizens special shoppers bus schedule 
to the Stop & Shop Plaza, Southern Artery on Tuesdays. 



Pickup 

Oceanview,9ajn. 
Sawyer Tower, 9:30 ajn. 
Pagnano Tower, 10 ajn. 
Oceanview, 10:40 ajn. 
Sawyer Tower, 10:45 ajn. 



Return 

10:30 a.m. 
1 1 a.m. 
1 1:30 ajn. 
Noon 
Noon 



Thursday, January 25, 1973 Quincy Sun Page 15 



The Senior Scene 





OFFICERS of St. Ann's Senior Citizens Club are congratulated by Mrs. Marion Andrews [right] , 
Director Senior Citizens Activities. From the left are Mrs. Alice Brenan, secretary; Mrs. Mary Whalen] 
president, and Mrs. Helen Shea, treasurer. 

[Quincy Sun Photo] 

VITA To Help With Income Tax Forms 



Quincy will have a VITA 
Program (Volunteer Income Tax 
Assistance] this year, announces 
Mayor Walter J. Ilannon. 

"We are cooperating with 
Federal Internal Revenue Service 
to provide income tax assistance 
to our senior citizens at no cost. 

VITA is a federal program 
sponsored by Internal Revenue 
Service designed to train 
volunteers in all aspects of 
Forms 1040 and 1040A. 



Through the cooperation of the 
Quincy Council on Aging and 
The Quincy Public School 
Department such a. training 
program has recently been 
completed. 

Because major emphasis is 
placed upon service to the 
elderly, Mayor Hannon has 
assigned proper direction to 
Putnam S. Borden, executive 
director, Council on Aging. 

From Feb. 5 to April 13 



VITA volunteers will be on duty 
al City Hall in !he City Council 
chamber from 3 to 5 p.m.. and 
at the Council on Aging office, 
John l : . Kennedy Health Center, 
1 120 Hancock St., 7 to 9 p.m.. 
Monday through Friday. 

Telephone inquiries and 
home appointments for the 
disabled can be made after Feb. 
5 between 7 and 9 p.m. by 
calling 773-1 509. 



Seniors Vacation Trip To Spain 



The Quincy Park-Recreation 
Board announces that an 
eight-day, seven-night Senior 
Citizen vacation trip to Costa 
Del Sol, Spain is being planned 
by the Quincy Recreation 
Department for March 27 to 
April 4. 

Recreation Director William 



F. Ryan said that accomodations 
in Spain will be at the deluxe 
(Iran Hotel Nautilus and will 
include two meals daily, transfer 
between airport and hotel, plus 
all taxes and gratuities. Bus 
transportation will be provided 
to and from Logan Airport and 
by jet to and from Spain. 




ALL DINNERS 50 CENTS 



/Served at Sawyer Towers, 
Martensen St./ 



Monday, Jan. 29 
with vegetables, 
coffee, dessert. 



- Beef stew 
roll-butter, 



Tuesday, Jan. 30 - Baked 
chicken breasts with 
potatoes, green beans, 
roll-butter, coffee, dessert. 

Wednesday, Jan. 31 - Baked 
beans and Ham, roll-butler, 
coffee, dessert. 

Thursday, Feb. 1 - 
Soup-vegetable beef, chicken 
salad sandwich, coffee, 
dessert. 



Friday, Feb. 2 - Baked 
macaroni and cheese with fish 
sticks, roll-butter, coffee, 
dessert. 

Monday, Feb. 5 - Hot turkey 
sandwich with gravy, 
vegetable, green peas, coffee, 
dessert. 

Tuesday, Feb. 6 - Spaghetti 
with meat sauce, Italian 
bread, coffee, dessert. 

Wednesday, Feb. 7 - Corn 
chowder, ham salad 
sandwich, coffee, dessert. 

Thursday, Feb. 8 - Hamburg 
patty with potatoes, yellow 
beans, roll-butter, coffee, 
dessert. 

Friday, Feb. 9 - Surf cake, 
baked beans, roll-butter, 
coffee, dessert. 



Extras include a half-day 
sightseeing tout of Malaga, 
Sangria Party, insurance and 
travel bag. 

Further information may be 
obtained at the Quincy 
Recreation office, JFK Health 
Center. 1 120 Hancock St., or by 
calling 773-1 380, Fxt. 204. 

What's Doing 
In Your Club? 

What's doing in your 
senior club? 

If you have a meeting or 
special activity coming up, 
you can have it publicized on 
this new Quincy Sun feature 
page. 

The page will appear the 
first and third week of each 
month. Deadline for 
submitting news items is 
Monday of the week they are 
to appear. ■». 

Send items to the Council 
on Aging Office, 1 120 
Hancock St., Quincy, 02169. 



For Home 
Delivery 

CM 
471-3100 



Mrs. Mary Whalen St. Ann'i Seniors President 



Mrs. Mary Whalen was 
installed to a third term as 
president of St. Ann's Senior 
Citizen Club Tuesday. 

Also installed were Mrs. Mary 



Woods, vice-president; Mrs. 
Helen Shea, treaurer; Mrs. Alice 
Brennan, secretary and Michael 
Coen, guard. 

Mrs. Marion Andrews, 



director Senior Citizens 
Activities, was the installing 
officer. 

Ceremonies were held at St. 
Ann's Recreation Center. 



■"■» 



■MM 



MMM 



Page 16 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 25, 1973 




«. 



ostongas 



Frank D. Hackett Joins 
Staff At Colonial Federal 



Philip J. Lawrence, president 
of Colonial Federal Savings and 
Loan Association of Quincy 
announces the addition of Frank 
D. Hackett to the staff. 

In his new position, Hackett 
will be responsible for 
Management Development. 

Formerly associated with the 
Boston Gas Co. as assistant sales 
manager, he more recently was 
with South Shore National Bank 
as assistant vice president of the 
Branch Administration Division 
responsible for business 
development throughout the 
South Shore area. 

A life long resident of 
Quincy, Hackett is active in 
community affairs. 

He is a past president of the 
Quincy Rotary Club and present 
chairman of the Board of 
Trustees of the Thomas Crane 
Public Library. 

He is chairman of clubs and 
organizations for the United 
Fund campaign, past president 
of St. Ann's Holy Name Society 
and a member of the 
Professional Conditions 
Committee of the Quincy 
School Committee. 

He attended Quincy Schools 
and Boston University. 





FRANK D. HACKETT 

Hackett lives at 144 Prospect 
Ave., Wollaston. He and his wife, 
Ruth, have four children, Mrs. 
Joan E. Cody of Wellesley; Mrs. 
Eileen R. Rangney of Milton, 
Thomas F. Hackett of Tustin, 
Calif., and Nancy Hackett, at 
home. 



NEW MOBILE CUSTOMER information center of the Boston Gas Co., arrived in Quincy this week as a 
new consumer service. From the left are John J. Bacon, vice-president customer relations; Miss Kathy 
Dugan of Thornton St., Wollaston; Mrs. Patti Molloy and daughter, Jacqueline, of Holmes St., North 
Quincy; and City Development Coordinator John J. Cheney. 

Boston Gas Mobile Information 
Center Stationed In Quincy 




Boston Gas brought its new 
mobile customer information 
center to Quincy Tuesday, as 
part of the company's six-month 
pilot program to bring the gas 
company to the customer. 

The program began last 
November when Boston Gas 
established the office on wheels 
in three Boston communities: 
East Boston and the Uphams 
Corner and Fields Corner 
sections of Dorchester. 

"The purpose of this test 
program," John J. Bacon, vice 
president of customer relations, 
said, "is to make Boston Gas 
more readily and easily 





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accessible to our customers. The 
mobile office will be at Quincy 
Square in front of the Hancock 
Cemetery, near City Hall, each 
Tuesday to assist our customers 
in every way possible. 

"It is not our intent to make 
this mobile office a sales center 
or a bill payment station; that's 
not its purpose," Bacon 
emphasized. "We are here to 
assist our Quincy customers who 
have a problem understanding 
their gas bill or have a question 
about them. Our trained 
personnel also will be available 
to help customers with service 
inquiries and to answer, or find 
the answers, to any questions 
the customer may have about 
Boston Gas." 

Bacon noted that there has 
been growing interest in the 
mobile* office at the three 
locations in Boston. "More and 
more people are taking 
advantage of this new service," 
Bacon said. 

"It takes time for people to 
first learn that we are here in the 



community to help them and 
then to become familiar with 
what it is we can do for them." 
At each location, including 
Quincy, the Boston Gas 
representatives at ihe mobile 
office have telephone 
communications with the main 
office so that questions from 
customers can be answered 
promptly. 

"The mobile customer 
information office is not here 
exclusively for Boston Gas 
Customers," Bacon said. "We 
look forward to meeting anyone 
who has a question about the 
company and our services while 
attending to the needs of 
customers at the same time. 

"This pilot program," Bacon 
added, "will help us determine 
how great the need is for more 
direct contact with our 
customers, which of our policies 
and procedures help us give 
better service and which should 
be changed. We're here to help 
and to learn." 



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Thursday, January 25, 1973 Quincy Sun Page 17 




AWARD WINNER - Mrs. Linda E. Simpson of 60 French St., North 
Quincy, receives suggestion award for improved office form from 
Thomas P. Watkins, vice president of John Hancock Mutual Life 
Insurance Co. Mrs. Simpson's suggestion was to incorporate five 
office forms into one which resulted in reduced errors and 
processing time. 

Wollaston Park Assn. Opposes 
100 Percent Revaluation 



The Wollaston Park 
Association has pledged "to 
cooperate in any way we can to 
prevent the implementation of 
100 percent revaluation in 
Quincy." 

In a letter to City Council 
President Arthur H. Tobin, 
officers said their organization 
considered revaluation a 



"Pandora's Box". 

President Harold A. Nannis 
and Secretary Dorothy C. Kelly 
said they agreed with Tobin's 
contention that revaluation 

''would be disastrous 
particularly to the elderly, 
veterans, widows and small 
homeowners. 



Lawrence Kurtzer 
Completes A-F Training 



Airman Lawrence E. Kurtzer, 
son of Mrs. John P. McDonough 
of 118 Doane St., Gmuantown, 
has completed Air Force basic 
training at Lackland AFB, Tex. 



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During his six weeks training, 
he studied the Air Force 
mission, organization and 
customs and received special 
instruction in human relations. 

The airman is remaining at 
the Air Training Command base 
for specialized training in the 
security police field. 



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Delahunt Bill Would Give Public 
'Open Access' To Records 



Asserting that "it is a 
fundamental right of a citizen to 
know what his government is 
doing," Rep. William D. 
Delahunt, (D-Quincyl 
announces he has filed 
legislation to "give citizens free 
and open access" to 
governmental records. 

His bill would clarify the 
right of access to public records, 
w d define the scope of public 
records, and would provide 
effective remedies if access is 
wrongfully denied. 

Under the bill, the term 
"public records" would mean 
''books, papers, maps, 
photographs, or other 



documentary materials, 
regardless of physical form" 
made or received by any public 
office holder. 

F. xceptions would include 
"material related to internal 
personnel rules and practices, or 
policy statements, or 
investigatory materials." 

"If any public official or 
agency refuses a request for 
access to information as outlined 
in this bill. Delahunt said the 
citizens denied access may seek u 
writ of mandamus in the 
Superior Court." The law would 
also require the official or 
agency to affirmatively prove 
that the information requested is 



not a public record and the 
citizen would not have the 
burden of proof as to 
demonstrating that it is a public 
record . 

"I need not ennunciate the 
importance of public access to 
the records of a government put 
in office by the very same 
public." he said. 

The legislation would 
establish a nominal charge for 
reproduction of records. 

Calling for the "liberal" 
interpretation of "public 
records", the legislation requires 
that an official prove why he 
cannot disclost the information. 



Mrs. John MacDonald Elected 
Covenant Women Head Counselor 



Mrs. John MacDonald of 
South Central Ave., Wollaston, 
has been elected head counselor 
of the Covenant Women of 
Covenant Congregational 
Church, Quincy at its 58th 
annual meeting. 

Other counselors elected were 
Mrs. Kenneth Nelson and Mrs. 
Robert Day. 

Other officers elected were 



Mrs. Lloyd Allen, Miss Winifred 
Erickson, Miss Dorothy Ingham, 
Mrs. Stanley Nelson, Mrs. 
Warren Hedin and Mrs. Arvid 
Jacobson. 

Elected committee chairmen 
were: 

Mrs. Samuel Collins, 
membership; Mrs. Anna 
Jacobson, sunshine; Mrs. Albert 
Collins, nominating; Mrs. 



Howard Bassett, February 
through June program; and Mrs. 
Carl Lundgren, September 
through January 1^74 program. 

Covenant W o m e n 
representative is Mrs. Samuel 
Collins; Mrs. Neil Rockwell is 
C h u r c h W o m e n Unit e d 
representative. 

Plans will be announced for 
the 58th annual banquet. 



Atty. Francis Bellotti At Trial Lawyers Seminar 



The Massachusetts Chapter of 
the Association of Trial Lawyers 
of America will sponsor a 
seminar on the prosecution and 
defense of a criminal motor 
vehicle case Jan. 27, at Holy 
Cross College, Worcester. 

Quincy Atty. Francis X. 
Bellotti will present the defense 
and Asst. Dist. Atty. Stanley J. 
Jablonski of Worcester will 
prosecute before Special Justice 
Morris N. Gould of Clinton 
District Court. 



The morning seminar, 
beginning at 9 a.m., will feature 
a detailed analysis of elements of 
use of the breathalyser for 
prosecution and defense. 



Bellotti, a member of, the 
Board of Directors of the 
Massachusetts Chapter ATL and 
Jablonski will demonstrate trial 



techniques such as direct and 
cross examination of lay 
witnesses and experts and basic 
criminal law procedure. 




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Page 18 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 25, 1973 



In Basketball 



North Needs Comeback 
Ouincy Nurses Injuries; 



Can North Quincy's 
basketball team pull the 
comeback of the year, win eight 
of its last nine games and make 
the state tournament? 

The odds are against the 
Raiders but Coach Bob Noldn is 
confident they can do it. 

"We are going to make a bid 
for the tournament," Nolan said 
following last Friday's 
heartbreaking 83-75 double 
overtime loss to undefeated 
Medford. "If anybody is a 
betting man, bet on us." 

The Raiders, unbeaten league 
champs a year ago but only a 
disappointing 3-4 in league play 
and 4-4 overall, started the long 
haul toward a hoped-for tourney 
berth Tuesday at Chelsea. Friday 
they will play at Fverett and 
next Tuesday will be home to 
Somerville. 

Despite what Coach Marty 
Finnegan called "our best 
showing in a long time," Quincy 
lost to Fveretl Friday, 71-67, to 
drop its record to 2-7 [ 2-5 in the 
league |. 



The Presidents, riddled by 
injuries, hosted Maiden Tuesday, 
are home to Medford Friday and 
play at Revere Tuesday. ' 

North turned in one of its 
superior efforts against Medford 
and Nolan said, "Even in defeat 
you can be a winner. 

"Every kid that played 
chipped in and they won the 
hearts of the fans and the 
Medford team. They played one 
great game. They gave away 
height on the boards but battled 
for every rebound." 

The score was 62-all at the 
end of regulation play. Pete 
Bellotti hit on two foul shots in 
the final seconds of the first 
overtime period and the teams 
went into the second extra 
session still tied at 68-68. But 
the unbeaten Mustangs 
outscored the Raiders, 15-7, in 
the second overtime to clinch 
things. 

Jamie Doherty continued to 
be high scorer with 23 points 
and Billy Shea had 14. Bobby 
Morton didn't score but was 



tremendous his work on the 
boards kept North in the game 
until he fouled out in the fourth 
period. 

Quincy battled Everett all the 
way. Trailing by six at the half, 
the Presidents cut the gap to one 
in the third period led by John 
Reggiannini but Everett's Arnie 
Heavy, who scored 25 points, hit 
on a series of outside shots to 
keep his team in front. 

Mike Marvelle, one of three 
Presidents who were on 
crutches, returned for a brief 
stint and was lauded by 
Finnegan, as was Reggiannini, 
who again paced the scorers with 
26 points. Mark MacLeod had 
1 2 points and Ken Furfari 1 0. 

Earlier in the week Medford 
ran away from Quincy in the 
first period, 21-6, and went on 
to a 78-58 win. 

"They had much too much 
depth for us and also were much 
taller," Finnegan said. "It is hard 
to beat 1 kids with five." 

Reggiannini scored 18, 
Furfari 15, Phil Iovanna 12 and 
MacLeod 10. 



In Track 

Quincy Stands In Way Of North 



If the North Quincy track 
team wins its final meet 
Saturday it will do no worse 
than tie for the Creater Boston 
League championship. 

But who is the final 
opponent? Quincy, that's who, 
and the Presidents would like 
nothing better then to knock the 
Raiders out of the title when 
they meet at 9:30 a.m. at the 
Medford High cage. 

Bob Gentry's North team, the 
school's best in years, defeated 
Maiden, 53-33, last week to tie 



SOUTH SHORE 
SKINDIVER 




Revere and Somerville, ill with 
41 marks. 

Tom Hall's Quincy team, still 
hit hard by injuries and illness, 
bowed to Medford, 50-36, to 
lose any chance it might have 
had, and its only goal now is to 
knock off North. 

North got off to a slow start 
against Maiden but finished up 
strong tp win going away. 

Gentry moved Jack Reynolds 
to the 300 for the first time and 
he won in the good time of 34.8. 
Teammate Jack Pomerole placed 
second. 

North moved into the lead in 
this event and opened up a safe 
margin after that. 

Bob Mackey must be North's 
hard luck runner of the season. 
Two weeks ago he had the mile 
run won but fell just short of the 



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finish line and had to be satisfied 
with third place. 

Last week he crossed the 
finish line 20 yards in front but 
was disqualified for stepping 
into the next lane. 

Bob McCormack won the 
1000, Mark Canavan the 600, 
Lee Watkins the 50-yard dash, 
Mark Mulvaney the shot put and 
Jeff Hennessey the hurdles. 

And, the relay team remained 
undefeated in the final event, 
winning with Watkins, 
McCormack, Pomerole and 
Reynolds. 

Burt Bray, the Raiders' only 
unbeaten performer [shot put] 
missed last week's meet. 

Quincy's Marty Swirko, 
unbeaten in the 600 this year, 
was out of the lineup and on 
crutches and several other 
Presidents again were out of 
action with the flu. 

The President's winners were 
John Johnson and Art, 
DeLoreto, tied in the high jump; 
Dave Sten in the shot put, Mark 
MacLeod in the 1000 and Steve 
Player in the 2-mile. 



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rear door, sun roof. Has 2 extra 
seats in rear. Can be used for 
camping or a transporter. $2,095 

1969 Chevrolet Bel Air 4-Door, 6 

cylinder, standard shift, R&H. $1,295 

1969 Impala Custom Coupe. V-8, 
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Dennis, Furey Pace 
Squirt A's To Win 
Over Hingham 



Sean Dennis and John Furey 
collected two goals each Sunday 
as the Quincy Squirt "A" team 
knocked off Hingham, 6-1. 

Neil Shea, Mark Messina and 
Chuckie Marshall had the other 
scores. 

In non-league action, the 
Squirts: 

* Dropped one to Cambridge, 
4-2, with the goals going to 



Robbie Craig and Scott 
Richardson. 

• Bombed Braintree, 8-1, as 
Robbie Craig got two goals. The 
others were by Neil Shea, Mark 
Messina, Mark Veasey, Tommy 
Gerry, Chuckie Marshall and 
Paul McGrath. 

Next Sunday [Jan. 281 the 
Squirts meet Hull at 10:45 a.m. 
on Rink C, Hingham Arena. 



Kustka In Hat Trick As UCT 
Defeats Wollaston Theater 



Kenneth Kustka got the 
three-goal hat trick and Mike 
Vantassell added another goal 
Tuesday [Jan. 16l as United 
Commercial Travelers beat 
Wollaston Theater, 4-1, in 
Quincy Youth Hockey Pee Wee 
House League action. 

Johnny Marsters scored for 
the theater team. 

Crestview Nursing Home got 
goals from Billy Joyce, Paul 
Barry and Mike Colon in 



blanking Morrisette Post, 3-0. 

Bill Foley had a pair of goals 
and Charlie Laing a third as 
Keohane's tipped Shannonaires, 
3-1. Mike Pisterino was the lone 
Scorer for Shannonaires. 

Next Tuesday [Jan. 30] at 
Hingham Arena Morrisette meets 
Wollaston Theater, 6 p.m., Rink 
A; Shannonaires plays Crestview, 
6:15 p.m., Rink C; and UCT 
tangles with Keohane's, 7:30 
p.m., Rink C. 



Bertoni, Jolley In Hat Tricks 
For Pee Wee A's 



A pair of Brians, Bertoni and 
Jolley, turned in a pair of hat 
tricks last week as the Quincy 
Pee Wee "A" hockey team 
walloped Columbia, 9-3, and 
whipped Canton, 5-2, in Bay 
Colony Association play. 

Bertoni collected his three 
goals against Columbia, drawing 
an assist in the same game. He 
also had a goal and two assists 
against Canton. 

Jolley scored three times in 



the Canton game and once in the 
Columbia contest. 

Other goal scorers against 
Columbia were Mark Giordani 
[twice |, Dave Lewis, Mike 
Furey, and Ed Kane. Bobby 
Hayes had the fifth goal in the 
Canton game. 

Assists in the two games were 
awarded to Ed Kane 4, Bobby 
Hayes 4, John Norton 3, Brian 
Bertoni 3, John Kelly and Mark 
Giordani. 



Mike Storer Scores Two 
For Pee Wee B's 



Mike Storer chipped in two 
goals and an assist Saturday as 
the Quincy Pee Wee "B" hockey 
team blanked Scituate, 6-0. 



Don Perdios had a goal and 
two assists; Dan Cronin, Jim 
Moore and Dan Sullivan each 
had goals; and Jack Dunne 
collected an assist in the victory. 



Bantam A's Tie S. Boston 



The Quincy Bantam "A" 
team tied South Boston, 1-1, 
and beat Scituate, 4-3, in recent 
Bay Colony Association hockey 



action. 

In a non-league meeting, 
Quincy also walloped Walpole, 
6-2. 



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Thursday, January 25, 1973 Quincy Sun Page 19 



In Quincy Youth Hockey Action 



Bersani, Johnson, Sun In Bantam Wins 



Brad Harland scored two 
goals and goalie Jimmy Coffey 
turned in a shutout Saturday as 
Bersani Brothers beat Derringer's 
4-0 to go into a tie for first place 
in- the Quincy Youth Hockey 
Bantam House League. 

Jerry Smith and Paul 
Andrews, who are among the 
league's leading scorers, got the 
other goals for Bersani. 

Johnson Motor Parts helped 
to create the tie for the top spot 
with a 3-2 upset of Farina 
Kitchens on the strength of goals 
by Tommy Ward, Billy Morrison 
and Tommy O'Regan. 

Bob Crews and Bob Page 
collected the goals for Farina 
which now shares first place 
with Bersani with identical 
marks of four wins and two 
losses. 

Quincy Sun, recovering from 
a slow season's start, won its 
second in a row, 5-3, over 
Blackwood Pharmacy as Richie 
Boyle got the three-goal hat 
trick and Frank Pen/.o and Kevin 
Whelan chipped in singles. 

Jim Connors, Pat Downey 
and Dave Mitchell scored for 
Blackwood. 

Next Saturday's [Jan. 27] 
schedule at Hingham Arena finds 



Bantam 
Top Scorers 



Goals Assists Pts. 



John Fitzgerald, 

Farina 
Bob Carmody 

Blackwood 

Paul Andrews, 

Bersani 
Tom Wilkinson 

Farina 

Jerry Smith, 
Bersani 

Richie Boyle, 
Quincy Sun 

Dave Peters, 
Farina 

Rick Dannar, 
Blackwood 

Jim Connors, 
Blackwood 

Tom Ward, 
Johnson's 

Dave Hurley, ' 
Blackwood 



5 6 

2 8 

5 3 

5 3 

4 3 

5 > 2 



11 

10 

8 



4 
5 
2 
2 



3 
1 

4 
4 




Bersani vs. Quincy Sun, 7 a.m.. 
Rink A; Derringer's vs. Farina, 
7:15 a.m., Rink C; Johnson vs. 
Blackwood, 8:15 a.m., Rink A. 




Bantam House Standings 



Won 



Lost Tied 



Pts. 



Farina Kitchens 


4 


2 





8 


Bersani Bros. 


4 


2 





8 


Blackwood Pharmacy 


3 


3 


. 


6 


Quincy Sun 


2 


3 


1 


5 


Johnson Motor Parts 


2 


3 


1 


5 


Derringer's 


1 


3 


2 


4 



NARDONE ALUMINUM of the Quincy Youth Hockey House League Squirts lines up like this: Front 
row [left to right] Chris Dunn, Dave Bryan, Dick Rhinehardt, Brian Sullivan, Robert McHugh, Robert 
Kenney James Rooney, Bill Dudley. Second row, Dan Boyle, Dennis Harrington, Bruce Gordon, John 
Coleman, Paul Rhinehardt, Robert Monahan, Mark Andrews. Mike Barry. In rear are coaches William 

Monahan and Art Boyle. 

[Quincy Sun Photo] 

Nardone, Hannon Tire In Easy 
Squirt House Loop Victories 



Dennis Bertoni Scores Two 
Hat Tricks For Bantam B's 



Dickie Reinhart and Barry 
Sullivan had two goals apiece as 
Nardone Aluminum blanked Dee 
Dee's, 5-0, in a Quincy Youth 
Hockey Squirt House League 
game Friday. 

Dennis Harrington had the 



other goal. 

Hannon Tire thumped the 
North Quincy Professional 
Building, 5-2, on a pair of scores 
by Bobby Bolster and singles by 
Dave Picot, Brian Ofria and Ted 
Duggan. 



Jerry Watts and Craig DiB.ona 
scored for the losers. 

This Friday |Jan. 2b] at the 
Hingham Arena, NQPB plays 
Dec Dee's at 6:15 p.m.. Rink C; 
and Hannon meets Nardone at 
7:30 p.m., Rink C. 



Panico, O'Brien Lead Squirt B's 



Dennis Bertoni collected the 
three-goal hat trick Saturday as 
the Quincy Bantam "B" team 
knocked off league-leading 
Weymouth, 5-3, at the Hingham 
Arena. Dave Perdios and Richie 
Troy got the other goals. 

In non-League encounters, 
the Bantam "B" team: 

MARSHALL, CROSBY, 
HICKEY SCORE 

Mike Marshall, Bobby Crosby 
and David Hickey got the goals 
for Quincy as the Mite "B" team 
tied Abington Terriers, 3-3, 
Saturday [Jan. 20]. 



"• Edged Walpole, 4-3, with 
Bertoni getting another hat trick 
and Jerry Cronin adding the 
fourth goal. 

* Squeezed by West 
Bridgewater-Raynham, 4-3, on 
scores by Jim McConville, John 
Chiavaroli, John Cooney and 
Mike Smith. 

MIDGET A'S LOSE 
TO MUSTANGS 

The Quincy Midget "A" team 
lost to the Mustangs, 6-3, and 
then tied Canton, 3-3, in Bay 
Colony Hookey Association 
games last week 



The Quincy Squirt "B" team 
blanked Cohasset, 2-0, Saturday 
on goals by Mike Panico and 
Mike O'Brien and outstanding 
defensive play by Tommy 
Heffernan,. Danny Flynn, 



Tommy Jo Connelly Mike 
Hussey, Danny Malloy and Mike 
McDonald. 

In non-league games, Quincy 
bowed to Randolph, 5-0, and 
whipped Braintree, 4-2, with 



Mike Panico getting two goals 

and Joe Rathgeb and Mike 
Doherty one each. 

The Quincy Squirts meet 

Duxbury next Saturday [Jan. 
27 1 at 2 p.m. on Rink A, 
Hingham Arena. 



Mite A's Bow To Abington, 4-2 



Abington Huskies 
overpowered the Quincy Mite 
"A" team, 4-2, Sunday despite 
fine goal-tending performances 
by Mike Boussy and Tom 



Corless. 

Kevin Craig and Mike 
McNiece got the Quincy goals 
with assists going to Richie 
Durham. Richie Stevens and 



McNiece. 

Next Sunday [Jan. 28]. 
Quincy meets Avon at Hingham 
Arena at 1:15 p.m.. Rink B. 



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Page 20 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 25, 1973 



Young Presidents Rack Up Two Impressive Wins 



The Greater Boston League 
freshman hockey season was 
more than a month late in 
opening due to a delay in the 
completion of the v new Revere 
rink. 

However, it was worth the 
wait as far as the Quincy junior 
h i g h -f reshma n teanj is 
concerned. 

Ken Hayes' young Presidents, 



unbeaten in regular season play 
last year and owners of a 7-1 
overall record, are off and 
running again with impressive 
wins in their first two games. 

Last Friday Quincy rolled 
over Somerville, 1 1-6, as Capt. 
Frank Guest, last year's top 
scorer, exploded for four goals 
[he had five in the two games] 
and added three assists, and Jack 



Powers scored three goals (to 
also bring his two-game total to 
five | and had two assists. 
Alternate Capt. Bill Hammil had 
two goals and an assist and Paul 
Gustafson two goals. Nick Cyr, 
the other alternate captain, 
played a fine game. 

Earlier in the week Quincy 
topped North Quincy, 4-2, in 
the opening game as Powers had 



7 



STATEMENT OF CONDITION 

COLONIAL FEDERAL SAVINGS 
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF QUINCY 

Wollaston, Massachusetts 



Close of Business December 31, 1972 



ASSETS 



Mortgage Loans and Other 

Liens on Real Estate $29,386,803.57 



LIABILITIES AND NET WORTH 

Savings Accounts $30,604,251.20 



All Other Loans 



Real Estate Owned and 
in Judgment 



Cash on Hand and In Banks. . 

Investments and Securities. . . 

Fixed Assets Less 

Depreciation 



Deferred Charges and 
Other Assets 

TOTAL ASSETS 



441,277.21 

30,721.99 

322,896.83 

3,336,350.20 

165,529.43 

186,072.31 
$33,869,651.54 



Advances From Federal 
Home Loan Bank. . . 



Other Borrowed Money 
Loans in Process 



50,000.00 
338,200.00 
131,433.09 



Other Liabilities 593,923.00 

Specific Reserves 41,011.55 

General Reserves. .$1,553,053.53 

Surplus 557.779.17 2,110,832.70 

TOTAL LIABILITIES $33,869,651.54 



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two goals, Guest and Mark 
Giordini one each. Brian Bertoni 
had two assists, Hammil and 
Gustafson one apiece. 

"I was pleased with the 
performances in our first two 
games and the long wait 
apparently didn't hurt the 
boys," Hayes said. "Guest and 
Powers skated and shot very well 



and our skating and passing were 
outstanding." 

Last night [Wednesday l the 
North junior high-freshman team 
and high school junior varsity 
squad played Chelsea and Friday 
Quincy's squads will play 
Medford. The junior 
high-freshman game starts at 5 
and the junior varsity contest at 
6. 



YMCA Midget Wrestling 
Team Places Second 



The Quincy YMCA Midget 
wrestling team, boys 14 and 
under, placed second in total 
team points in the first annual 
Brockton Open Wrestling Meet. 

Eleven teams with over 100 
boys took part in the event - 
with Quincy finishing three 
points behind the winner 
Lawrence. 

Competing for Coach Vaughn 
Lovejoy's Quincy team and the 
order in which they finished: 

Kevin McKenna, first, 105 lb. 
class. 

MIDGET B*& EDGED 

BY EASTON 

Gary Delorio got the only 
Quincy goal as the Midget "B" 
team dropped a close game to 
Laston, 2-1, Saturday. The 
Midgets meet Abington Friday 
I Jan. 26 1 at 10 p.m. on Rink C, 
Hingham Arena. 



Karl Knudsen, second, 
heavyweight. 

Peter Hulburt, third, 105 lb. 
class. 

Sean McCue, third, 95 lb. 
class. 

Paul Villa, third, 65 lb. class. 

Martin Audukonis, third, 85 
lb. class. 

Joe Fleming, fourth, 
heavyweight. 

Louis Sheaffer, fifth, 65 lb. 
class. 

Pat Sullivan, seventh, 115 lb. 
class. 



RICH'S TIES, LOSES 

Rich's South Shore Express 
tied Tiffany Realty, 4-4, and lost 
to Cox Rambler, 10-1, in recent 
Quincy Youth Hockey Midget 
House League action. 




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ASTHMA AND EXERCISE 



According to a Denver medical 
research team which specializes in 
the treatment of lung diseases, 
chronic asthma patients do not 
have to be treated like invalids. 
Doctors there have found that 
controlled exercise programs 
work better than prolonged rest 
in rehabilitating their patients. 

Thirty-nine patients with the 
allergic type of asthma were 
divided into two groups. For 
three months, one group 
participated only in routine 
hospital activity and was not 
allowed any physical exertion. 
The other group had daily 
exercise, including one hour of 
sports such as basketball. At the 
end of the three month period, 
the groups exchanged, the 
exercisers becoming non-cxerciscr 



and vice versa. 

None of the patients was made 
worse by the increased physical 
activity and no increase in asthma 
medication was necessary. But 40 
percent of the exercisers showed 
measurable improvement in their 
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* * * 



This information has been 
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Thursday, January 25, 1973 Quincy Sun Page 21 



On The Screen 

By Vincent Puleo 



The Godfather' Tops 
'GWTW AS Top Moneymaker 

The dethroning of one cinema champ, and the crowning of its 
successor has relegated "GONE WITH THE WIND" to the number 
two position on the All-Time Box Office Champ List. "THE 
GODFATHER" is now king of the hill... Less than one year on the 
market, and already "THE GODFATHER" has established its niche 
as the NUMERO UNO moneymaker of all time... 

Several factors made for clear sailing of "THE GODFATHER" to 
its number one position in its natal year... The strong reader 
response of the best selling MARIO PUZO novel whetted the 
audiences appetite for visual affect. Some timely gangland slayings, 
the fuss of controversy which lead to the deletion of the word 
"mafia" from the film, and of course the strong screen presence of 
MARLON BRANDO... 

BRANDO was, is, the "Godfather"... Paramount's starring him in 
the principle role can only be labeled one of the shrewdest, or if 
you'd have it luckiest, bits of casting in cinema history... Without 
him, this would never have been the box office clouter it so 
developed into... Without BRANDO, "THE GODFATHER" would 
have been just another gangster yarn... 

The following is a compilation of the Top 10, All Time Box 
Office Moneymakers, including the films' year of release and gross 
•intake... Of the Top 10, only one dates back to the "Golden Era" of 
the motion picture industry; two others are representative of the 
50's, four of the 60's, and the remaining three covering the "New 
Era" of the 70's... As this columnist wrote last year, by the end of 
this decade the Top Ten could very well read like a filmlog of the 
Seventies... 

THE TOP TEN: "THE GODFATHER" [1972], $81.5 million; 
"GONE WITH THE WIND" [1939], S77.03M; "THE SOUND OF 
MUSIC" [1965], $72 M; "LOVE STORY" [1970], $50 M; "THE 
GRADUATE" [1968], $48.3 M; "DOCTOR ZHIVAGO" [1965], 
$47.95 M; "AIRPORT" [1970], $45.3 M; "THE TEN 
COMMANDMENTS" [1956] , $43 M; "BEN HUR" [1959] , $40.75 
M; and "MY FAIR LADY" [1964] , $32 M... 

Nine of the Top 10 motion pictures were repeats from last years 
survey. Missing this turn around is "MARY POPPINS" [1964] , $31 
M, which slipped to number 12 on the AlltTime List... And to give 
you an idea how fluctuating the Top 10 is, two years ago "MARY 
POPPINS" had a solid grip on the 8th ranked position, with 
"THUNDERBALL" notched securely in place number 10 [on this 
years chart "THUNDERBALL" is holding precariously onto its 14th 
place on the List] ... Two years makes a big difference... 

As for how next years Top 10 chart will look, I'll limb climb a 
bit... "THE SOUND OF MUSIC" will be in second place. The 
reason? After five years away from the screen it is being brought 
back this spring. And this means the film is good for at least to $5-8 
million more... "MY FAIR LADY" will have slipped several notches. 
"M-A-S-H" is a scant $900,000 behind and looms as a strong Top 10 
bet because of talk of its being reissued... And really going out on a 
limb, "LOST HORIZON", as yet unreleased, could be good for $35 
M or more at the box office. My finer instincts tell me this picture 
"has it"... 

The sexsationally talented DIANA ROSS was named CUE 
Magazine's Entertainer of the Year, the first of many awards for Miss 
ROSS I'm sure. No way about it, 1972 was "her" year... Continuing 
on the awards trail, two "YOUNG WINSTON" alumni came in for 
some heavy recognition. CARL FOREMAN was named the Show 
Business Writer of the Year, and SIMON WARD the Film Actor of 
the Year by the Variety Club of Great Britain... 

As of this writing SAMMY DAVIS JR. is 104% sure of having his 
own situation-comedy with NBC come this fall. Such positivism 
reminds me of What's-his-names 1000% backing of you know who... 
And the Price Commission said no to a 10% increase of boxoffice 
prices for three films: "UP THE SANDBOX", "THE GETAWAY" 
and "THE POSEIDON ADVENTURE"... Speaking of the latter, 
"POSEIDON" in its first three weeks of distribution has done better 
than $12 million in the U.S. and Canada... A whopper of a flick, and 
the nation's number one box office attraction. A topsy-turvy 

entertainment plus... 

For the curious, CHERI CAFFARO is Women Libs answer to 
James Bond. Ms. CAFFARO'S next high-jinx caper is "GIRLS ARE 
FOR LOVING" [and espionage, gunfighting, karate chopping, and 
seducing]... New one coming soon, "THE FAMILY". Starring 
CHARLES BRONSON, it is a feature about that "type" of family,, 
not the Ma and Pa Kettle kind... Reunion Time: JIM BROWN and 
director GORDON DOUGLAS signed to lense "SLAUGHTER 1 1". 
Away back in 1964, DOUGLAS directed BROWN in the latter's first 
motion picture "RIO CONCHOS"... 



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Veterans 
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LEGAL NOTICE 



LEGAL NOTICE 



EDITOR'S NOTE: Veterans and 
their families are asking 
thousands of questions 
concerning the benefits their 
Government provides for them 
through the Veterans 
Administration. Below are some 
representative queries. 
Additional information may be 
obtained at any VA office. 

Q - My son is in a military 
hospital and expects to be 
confined there until he is 
discharged. How can he learn 
about any VA benefits that he 
may be entitled to? v 

A - Veterans Administration 
counselors visit all military 
hospitals and military separation 
centers. If your son has not been 
contacted yet, suggest that he 
ask for the hospital's personal 
affairs officer. 

Q - I'm enrolling for the 
February semester as a college 
freshman. Having a wife and two 
young children, what will VA 
pay me under the G.I. Bill? 

A - If you are a qualified 
• veteran and attending school full 
time you will receive monthly 
while in training $298. 

Q - My father is in a nursing 
home. What proof does he need- 
to be eligible for the special 
allowance for veterans who need 
regular aid and attendance? 

A - A statement from the 
director or custodian of records 
of a nursing home that the 
claimant is a patient who 
requires nursing home care, or a 
certification by a private 
physician stating why care is 
required will be accepted as 
evidence for the need for aid and 
attendance. 



CITY OF QUINCY 

IN COUNCIL 

ORDERED: January 15, 1973 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy, as follows: 

That the Revised Ordinances of the City of Quincy. 1960, as amended, be 
further amended as follows: 

In Chapter 15. Offenses - Miscellaneous. Section 40A. School of Massage or 
Massage - Bath 

No person or persons shall teach or conduct an establishment to teach 
students the business of massage, or the giving of baths, without a license for 
the above being granted by the Commissioner of Public Health. 

No person or persons shall have a Massage Parlor or an establishment for 
the giving of vapor, pool, shower or other baths for hire or reward, or hold 
himself out as being in the business of massage or the giving of said baths 
without a license for the above being granted by Commissioner of Public 
Health. 

A true copy Attest: John M. Gillis 
Clerk of Council 
1/25/73 



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BOB O'DONNELL, CHERYL CENTRELLA, CARL HERRETT, HOWARD SCOTT, ROBERT 
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BARROW, DAVID CARPENTER.] 
We wish to thank all of you for your support, for it is you that made this possible. 

That possibility began in the form of an inspiration of a 24-year-old boy four years 
ago, and today has developed into a responsive, creative, growing business enterprise, 
operated by 9 young people, none of whom is close to 30. 

Perhaps our example can stand as a statement that the American Dream has not died 
for the young. Thank You. 



WVHBS 



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l\igo 22 Ouincy Sun Thursday. January 25. IW . 



LEGAL NOTICES 



LEGAL NOTICES 



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prison. In' ip|MMlll..l atlinnilsliatm 
ol sanl csliile. 

11 von desne lo o|i|i'< I tlirii'lo vmi 
Ol Volll alloimv should III.- ,i Wlllll'll 

.ipp.Mi.in. e ill vihl < oml ,il Onint v 
In-Ioi<- I.-ii o'. link in ihr loiriioon on 

I III' I .Mill. -.Mill il.IV III IfhlH.IIV 

1*1/ I, ||||- l.-limi il.iV ol Ihis t ll.llloil. 

Wilmss. I. KHIN ION. Isiniiie. 

I IISl lltllff o| Villi (ollll, I his 

iliventli il.iv ol I;iiiii.iiv I 1 '/ I. 

Paul C. ( ia\ . 
Kff.islei 
I/IK >s .'/!//« 



I OMMONWI \l III Ol 

massaciihsi its 

Noll. ilk. SS. I'lo I. .lie (ollll 

I'o .ill prisons iiMetesle.l hi Mi.- 
estate ol NICIKM ASI. KOHKY late 

ol Otlllli V III Villi CoillllV. lift eased 
A petition ll.is I.e. ii pi.'s.-nl.-il lo 
•..1 1.1 ('mill lot pinli.ilc ol ,i ..ll. Mil 
iii.tliniienl piiipoilMif to l»- III.- I.isl 
will ol ".ml .1.-. .-.is.-il l.v ACNIS A. 

Kill I UN ol l.llMIM \ III III.- (oillllv ol 
Null. ill, ptaviilf. • It .it slit- oi some 

..III. 'I Slllt.lhlf p.'ISOII. Ill' .ipp.Mlll.'.l 
.1. Illlllll'.ll, llll\ Willi III.- Will ,11111. 'Sill 
ol '..till eslale. 

II \ Oil lll'Sllf lo o|.|.-. I III. 'I. 'lo \ .Ml 
Ol mill .lll.lllll'V '.ll.Mll.l till- .1 Wllll.°ll 
.ipp.'.ll.llli .- Ill -..II. I ( '.Mill .ll lllOokllM.' 

Ih'Ioii' I. -ii ..'. lo. I, iii ill.- I. m. noon on 
III.' I S\ .11 1 \ i- Ifll lit .l.iv ol I i'Imii.iiv 

I''/ 1. III.- i.linii .l.iv ol Ihi', . it. iti. mi 
Wilmss. I. MlllN ION. lupin.-. 

I list lllilff ol s.il.l (ollll. Illlstoililh 
tl.IV ol I. Mill. II V l'l I \. 

l*;iiiir <;.i\. 
Kt-fislf. 

i/iK *s »/i/.*i 



i ii v ill' (iuincy 

MASSACIIHSI IIS 

I'HKCHASINO DII'l. 

II *OIIAN< (M K SI. 

(.t|i|N( V. MASS. II.MWI 

I I 4 ; A I All 

Invites '..-.il.'.l piopos.il'. lot 

lllllll*tllll|' Mllll llfllVflHIf. lo III.' ('llv 
ol < .III Illi V. N. ll"i .1 ll.'pl llli'li 

S< Imol liiploni.r. 

Il.'l.iilr.l spi-i i!i. .ilions" .in- on hli- 
il Ihi- olln <- ol III.- I'm. Hasiiif Af.rnl 

Kids niii-.l .(.it.- pn>>iili«-s. il .hi \ . 

till' .l.'llV.'IY ll.llr .mil .HIV allitW.llile 

■ lei i. mil', linn pin.- I. i.r. will I..' 
fiven Inst . onsiil.'i.ili..ii .in.) will I..' 

I.'. I'l\ I'll .ll I III' ol I I. .' ol III.' 

I'un hasiiif Af.enl. I I'D Ham o«k SI.. 
(.Mini. v. Mass . iinlil h+ I .'. I 1 '/ I .it 
III Illl A.M. il win. Ii linn ami pi... 
Iln'v will I..' piil.li. Iv op.-n.-il .mil 
n ,i.l I'mpovils inn si I.r in .i ..'.il.'.l 

t-IIV.'lop.' .Mill oil III.' olll'.l.lt- mill kill 

HAM lit. I .». l'l/ I IIMI III III) 
A.M. Mi.l .in I"'.. .1 

I In- iifllt is n-seivetl I.. n|.-i I anv 

in .hi i. i.r. ..I i<> .i.<<-pi .my p. mi oi .i 

bill o| III.' on.' deemed I'.'.l lot tin'. 
(Il\. 

Ki. haul K. N.-w. .mil. 
I'm i Ii.i'.iiik Af.enl 
l/.'N .»/!//« 



CITY 01 QUINCY 
MASSACIIUSI ITS 

IMIK( IIASINii Hiri 
1 12(1 IIAN< OCKST. 
OUINCY.MASS. D.'U.'I 

i k;ai ad 

Invites sealed piopos.ils lot 
Ininishiiif jiml tleliveimf. lo (lie (itv 
ol Ommv. I'nhte Depl. I'oln e 
Insulin. .-. 

IK-I;iilril sp.i ill. .lllolis iiir on hie 
.it till' olln <• ol tin- I'm. Ii.ismp. Af.enl. 

Ilnls miisl stale piiorihis, it anv. 
Iln- dehveiv dale ami any allow alde 
.lis. .. nnls. linn pi i.r In.ls will In- 

flVfll 1 1| Sl I ollNltift.llloll .mil will He 

ii-it-ived at I In* ollin- ol the 
I'm. hasiiif. AK'iil. I I .Ml ll.ni.o. k Sl.. 
Onimv. Miss., until | eh /. I'l/lal 
III W) A.M. at win. Ii Inn.' ami plan- 
Ihrv will In* pnlih.lv opened ami 
nail. I'loposals nmsl | M - in a sealed 
envelope anil on Iln- oiilsi.l.- milked 
MAN I.I.. /. HIM IIMI III Nl 
A.M. Ilnl rn. losvil 

Tin- iif.lll is n-M'ivril lo i«-|«'< f anv 
oi all I't.ls oi lo an. pi anv pail ol a 
ImiI oi tin- one (li.-nu-il hrsl toi the 
lilv. 

Ki. haul K. Niw< oinli 
I'm. Iiasiiif. Af.nl 
l/IH .'S/7 1 

i (IMMONWIAI TIMII- 
MASSAC IICSI I IS 

Notloll. . '.s l'l. . I. air ('oml 

In all prisons inlrusl.'il in tin' 
.slid ol VINllNI Hi(;i.\(nM(» 
a | ... known a. VINlTN/O 
Dil.l All IMO lair •»» Mini" V hi -ml 
( 'i.nntv, il« - ' im'.i'iI. 

A pi'tllton has l.ri-ii pi.'s.'lit.'.l lo 
Villi • Ollll I'M pioli.il.' ol a I I'll. tm 
nr.li imi.'iil piiipoilnif. to In- III.' I.i'.l 
will <>t ..ml ili.i-asiil li\ AN I IK INV 
|li(.l \( HMD ol l.ltiiniv in Iln- 
(oiinh >>l Notlolk piaviii)'. Dial hi' l«' 
appoinl.il .'sc. iiloi Ihi-ii'ol wtliiotil 
(•iviiic a '.nnlv on he. I.ontl 

II Voll ill Mil' It. i.|i|.'i I III. 'I. 'to von 

oi vom all. mm. -v shoiil.l III.- a wiill. -ii 
appeal. in. i- in sanl I'oiiiI al ll.-itham 
l.i-loir I.-ii <•'. lo. I. in III.' I.m.'iiooii on 
Ihr Iwiiilv lir.l tlav ol I i'Imii.iiv 
I'M I. iln* irliiin ilav ol this . iI.iIi.mi 
\Vilii.v.. I KHIN It IN. H Wf l Wr . 

In. I III. 1^1° ol -Mil ( Ollll. Illl'. 

inn. |i. Mill .lav ol lannaiv l'l/ I. 

r.ml ( '. (Jav 
Krr.isii-i 

l/.'s .'/I K//» 



('(IMMONWI Al III nl 

MASSACIIUSI' I IS 

Nollolk.ss I'lol.ali- I oml 

10 all pt-isoiis inlii. ".I..I in III.' 
islalt- ol MAI'UK I I 'ASIHNIK lal. 
ol (Jinn, v in vml ( 'oiinlv. dr. .'.isi-tl 

A pi'lilion has In-. -ii pi. "..'Ml.'. I lo 
..ml (oml pi.ivmc thai IIYMAN 
( ASIIOOk ol Uanilolph in Ihr 

('oillllv ol Noilolk' In- .ippollll.'.l 

ailiniiiislialoi ol vml .-slalf will I 

l'iviii|' a -.in i I \ on Ins I.ontl. 

11 vmi il.siif lo ol»|r. I lliriflo von 
oi volll atloin.'V slionlil lilt' a wiilli'ii 
.ipp.'.iiani .- in s.m.I (unit al iN-.lhani 
Ih'Ioii- It'll l'l t lo. k HI lllf loirliooll oil 

Iln- Iwi-nlv Insl tl.iv ol I t-lmiaiv 

l'l /I. Ihr (rlilin ilav ot llir..il.iHoii 

Wiliirss. I. KHIN ION. Is*|iiiir. 

I IISl llllll'l l'l SI I.I ('.'Mil. this 

•..vriili-.-iilh ilav ol lannaiv \'*l ' 

I'.ml C.(.av 
Ki>!l'.li-| 
l/.'S VI K/M 



( II V IM MHINCY 

IN( ()UN( II 

(»KIH KIT* lannaiv Is. I •» / * 

It.' It ol.l.llll.-.l l<\ tin- ( lt\ ( "Mm ll ol Ihi- ( 'llv ol (.III Iln V. as lollov\ '. 

Dial Ihr Ki-vis.-il ( li.linaiii .". ol Hi.- (itv ol l.tiitmv. I'Kill. as .iint'iiiltil. In- 
fill Iftt'l amrii.l.'.l a-, lollows 

In ( h.iplti ,*. Ailiiiiiii-.lialioii. AiIhIi- NNV. Salaiirs S>-> lion I II lillisol 
I'osilnm. ami Satan (iiaih".. Slnkioiil tin- lollow iiif 



inn 

As-.i.taiil ll.miinii' I in.'. Im 

ami .i.l.l Iln' lollow iiif lo Hi.- salaiv .. In ilnl. 
Illl I 
Assistant II. iniii i 



(.KAIH 
IM I 

(.KAIH 
I Ml 



A lllli'opv. \lti-sl lollii M (.litis 
Cttlk ot ( Ollll. ll 



!/*'.//« 



(OMMONWI Al IIMH 

massai iiiisrns 

Noilolk. ss. Prohiih- Court 

I'o nil piisons iiili-H-slitl in Iln 
islalo ill Mil HI- V I. HOOKIK and 
KOIIIKi M. HOOKIK. hold ol 
Omm v in vml Coimlv. imiiots And 
- lo Mil' Allointv (.iiiti.il ol Ihr 
Kiiiliil Slatis. Ollnr ol Ah.ii 
1'iopoilv. il iu-ii-sviiv. 

A pi-lilion has In. -n pr.stnltil lo 
said ('oml lot auHioiilv lo ni>>ilf..i.'..' 
nilaiii i. il .stall' ol said Illinois 

II Voil tl.'SIH' lo ol>|l'l I lllt'l.'l.. vmi 

oi voni alliMM.-v should lilt- a wnlli-ti 
appi-.iiaiiii- in vml ('oml al Dtilli.iin 
Ix'loi.' l.n i.'iloi k in Hit- loit-iioon on 
Ihr st'vtiilli tlav ol liinnaiv. l'l/ I, 
Ihr it linn day ol this i il.ilnm 

Wilmss. I. KHIN ION. Isiumi-. 
Insl linli'.r ol said Couit. this st-t oml 
dav ol lannaiv. l'l/ I. 

IU'iiih-II V. Mi I aiij'hhii. 
Kri'.islt-i 
l/l I -IH-.VS/'/l 

(OMMONWI Al III Ol 
MASSACIIUSI ITS 

Noilolk. ss I'lnl. ll. ( 'oml 

10 all prisons intt'ii'sti'il in Ihi- 
t'.l.itt- ol IOSI I'll III NNI I I lalf ol 
i.limii v in ..ml l oiinlv. ih'i t-asril 

A p.'lition has In'i-n pi.'scnlt-il lo 
vml ('.mil Im piol.alt' ol a ..il. mm 
nisliiiimiil piiipiiiliii.' lo I..- tlir last 
will ami out' i. nil. il ..I vml ilc. I'asi'tl 
l'\ III l< Nil I I III NNI I I ol 
(.linn, v in Ihr CmimIv ol Noilolk 
pi.niiiir Dial .hi- In- appomli'tl 
.'senilis lli.'i.ol with. ml I'Mini' a 
.no Iv .mi h.'i Ii.miiI 

11 vmi .Ii'.ii.' lo ..|.|.'i i th. -i. to v.m 
oi void allom.-v should lit.- a wiillt-n 
app.-ai.iii. t- in vml l ".nl al 1 1. .Hi. mm 
li.-loi.- It-it o't Im k in Hit' l.iii'Mi'iMi on 
Iln- Iwriil\ Insl dav ol liluiiaiv 
l'l/ I. Hi.- it I in m dav ol I ll iv i nation 

Willi."... I IOIIN ION. Isipnif. 
I ii.l liitlt'i' o| .aid ("Mil. this 
ii.-lilc. nlli dav ol lannaiv l'»/l. 

I' nil C. <;.iv 

Kir.isli-I 

l/.'N VI K//I 



(OMMONWI A I III Ol 

MASSA( IIUSI ITS 

Nol lolk . ss I'lolialt- ( 'oml 

To all prisons mliit'sl.'.l m Ihr 
• slalt' ol Illl IN II. IIAKKIS lair "I 
(.liilin \ in sanl Coiinlv. .I.'i ras.-il. 

A prill I. mi has Im-.-ii pii-st-iil.-d lo 
vml ('.mil l.n pioltali- o| a it-ilain 
insliiiiiii-nl pnipoiliiii' I.. In- th.- l.r.i 
Will ami i odlt ll ot said .l>. t.i'.ril l.v 
KHIN A. SHI I IVAN ..I Wi-vinoiilh 
m Iln- CiMiiilv o| Noilolk piavini'. 

III.. I III- lit- .ipp.Mlll.'.l I'S.-.Ml.M 

Ih.-i.-ol w illi.mt )'ivm.' a vnirlv .m Ins 
I'l'ii.l 

II von ilt-snr lo o|i|t't I Ih.'ol" von 
oi mum alloimv should lit.- a wiillrii 
app.-.ll.ni..- in said Com! al llrilll.nil 
Ih'Ioii- l.n ..'. lock in lh<- loirnooti on 
Hit- l\\i-nl\ I ii'-l dav ol r.liiiiaiv. 
I'»/ I, Iln- irliiin <\.n o| this . Malum 

Willi."... I KHIN ION. Isinin.'. 
Insl liitlff "I sanl (.mil. this 
'.rvtiilitnlli tlav ol lannaiv l'1/t 

Caul ( (,av 
Kifislii 
l/.*N >/l K//I 

envoi oiiincy 

MASSAI IIUSI ITS 

l'UK( IIASIN(; IH l'l. 

1 1. 1 HANCOCK ST. 

n|i|N( Y.MASS,n.M(.'l 

I ll.AI Al> 

Invilt's sc. il.'. I piopovils l"i 
Ininishiiii' ami th lit nine '" "u (llv 
ol Oiiiihv, ( rint-li-iv Di'pl 
Si irrii.-.l loam Appiov I .MM) 
Yaids 

|)rlaili-il sp. 'i iln alums an- on lilr 
1 al tin- nlli..- ol Hit- I'm. hasmc. Af'.rnt 

Knls miisl slate pri.mties. il anv. 
Ihr ilelivriv dale and anv altowalde 
dis. oiinls In in pun- Im.Is will he 
C.iveii Insl niiisidi-ialioii ami will lie 
I e. i-ivi-il al tin- olln i- o| tin 
I'm. Ii.is.iitf. Ar.enl. I l.»(l ll.in.iN k SI.. 

(,)i v. Mass.. iniltl Ii-|». /. 11/1 al 

III IH) A.M. al will, h lime and pin e 
Ihiv will In- pnl.li. I\ iipenetl ami 
nail. I'ropovils nmsl be m a sealed 
envelope and on Hit- oiilstde malk. .1 
DAM l.h /. I')/ 1 IIMI 1(1 INI 
AM. Hid fin losril. 

Iln nehl is nseiveil lo it'M-. I anv 

Ol ,||| Kills III III .1.1 |-p| .|||\ p;||| ,,| ;, 

Kid H| the out id i nntl l.esl Km Hie 
(llv. 

K i« haul K. New. oml. 
I'm. hasiiif Afenl 
l/IK .'S//» 



(OMMONWI.AITIIOI 
MASSACIIUSI ITS 
Nollolk.ss. Prolmli' Ciiml 

In all pvisons nilrivsK-il in Iln' 
estate ol MAKION I 1*1 II KSON 
lale nl Onimv in said Count v. 
deeiasid. Ami K' •»•' Alloimv 
(iineial nl Ihr DniK'il SlaKs. OITkt 
ol Alun I'nipiilv.il nrnsvuv. 

A prlilion has hven pusi-iilnl In 
vml Coin I Ini pinhalv "I ;• ii'itiim 
iiisinniu-nl piii|M»ilinf. In h* lliv lust 
will nl viiil d»»iasi-d hy IIAKOI D I 
l'l' 1 1 KSON nl <^iinny in Hi«" Cniiiilv 
ol Noilolk piaviiv Hill In' •»•• 
appomled isnnloi Ihvicol wilhonl 
(•ivm|i a sini'ly on Ins Komi. 

II von ih-sne IooKm-i I Iheu-tn von 
oi vom atl.nnev shmild lite a willlen 
appeal ainv in vml (mill al Didhaiii 
U-loie K-niiMnik in Iln- Inu-noniion 
Iln- llnilv Insl dav nl lannaiv. l'l/ 1. 
I lie nillin dav nl tins . ilalmn. 

Wilmss. I. IOIIN ION. Isi|iim-. 
Insl liidi>i- ol said (oiiil. this 
I weiil v eif.hlli dav ol Det eniliei 
!'»/.». 

Heiintll V Mi laiiflihn. 
Ket'islei. 
I/II IK ?S/7I 

(OMMONWI Al I II Ol 
MAKSACIIHSI I IS 

Nollolk.ss. I'i. .Laic Cm I 

'I'll all peisoiis nileiesleil in Iln 
.stale ot I SIIIIK OAKKII I I A 
KHINSON late ol (.hum v in sanl 
( '.mill \. de. eased. 

A petition has Keen piesenleil lo 
said (oml l.v Will 1 1 II I II W. 
IOIINSON ol Waleilowii in Hie 
Cmiilv ol Mi.hlleses, pi.ivni)- lli.il 
Hie value ol the piopeilv ol '..in I 
tie. eased ie iii.iim ill)', allei I he 
p. i\ in. Ml ol ileitis ami t haii't-s ol 
.iiliiiinislialiiiii mav Ke tleteiiiini.-il l»\ 
..ml < .mil 

II Von ilesiie lo oli|.'< I Hi. i.l. . \iiii 
oi void alloinev shimlil lile a willlen 
appeal. im e in sanl ( ..nil it lledhaiii 
Keloie ten o't lork in Hie loit-nooii on 
tin- '.eveiilh dav ol I'l-Kiiiaiv. I')/ I, 
Hie nillin tlav ot this t ilalimi. 

Wilmss. I IOIIN ION. Isipine. 
Insl Imlfi- ol said ('..nil. this 
I wen I v tit-hill tlav ol De. eiiil.ei. 
l'l/.'. 

Hemietl V. M.T aiii'lilni 
Kei-islt-i 
l/IK.'S ,VI//« 

(OMMONWIArilMH 
MASSACIIUSI I IS 

Noilolk. ss. I'mKale ( 'mill 

10 all prisons ml. -i. sl.il in llie 
isl.ile ol WIIIIAM I HOOK WAY 
lale ol Oiinn v in said Coimlv. 
ilei eased. 

A petition has Keen piesenleil In 
said ('mill loi pi. .Kale ol at til. mi 
iiisliiimenl pin pollute to Ke the last 
will ol vml tie. e.ise.l l.v MAKY W 
HOOK WAY ol Oiinn v m Iln- Coiinlv 
ol Noilolk pi. nine, lli.tf she Ke 
appoitil.'d ese. nliis Iheit.-ol with. ml 
ins mi- a siiielv <m het Komi 

11 Voll ll. Mil' lo "li|.i I l||. -let" \ii.l 

oi voni alloinev should hie a willlen 
appeaiaii. e hi said ("Mil al llr.lli.iin 
Inli'ie ten o*. I... k in the loienomi on 
Hie I went v In -.1 dav ol I i'Imii.iiv 
I')/ l. Ihe i.'Iiiiii tlav ol Ihr. . iI.iIi.mi 
Wilmss. I. IOIIN ION. Isipme. 
Insl Iniii'.' ol vml ('.mil. Ihr. 
.i-veiitei-iilh dav ol lalniaiv l'l/ I 

I'aiilC. (in 
Hiflstel 
l/.'S .'/I K//1 



(OMMONWI Allll or 

MASSACIIUSI' I IS 

Noilolk. ss I'lolialt- ('.mil 

To IKI Nl (i. IINSIN ol I'm I'. 
Hnkiiowti. 

A IH" I ha\ Keen piesenleil lo said 
(oml l.v vom hiisKaml. Wll I IAM I 
ll-'NSI N ol (>iiiiii v in Ihe Coimlv ol 
Noilolk piavinr. that a divoiee liom 
the Komi ol nialiimonv helween 
himsell and von he tie. i.-.tl Kit Ihe 
. ailse ol iiiiel ami alnisive ti.-almeiil 
and pi .iv me; Im . iisI.nIv nl niinoi 
. Inlihen. 

II Vnn tl.-.iie lo o|.|.-i | Iheiilo. 
Vmi oi Volll .lll.'lll'V '.ll'iillil lid- a 
willlen appi-aiaii.e in s.n.1 (oml al 
I ltd hi in within Iweiilv mie davs 
Koni Hie cie.hlct nlh dav nl Apnl 
l'»/l. Ihe ii Inin dav ol (In-. . iI.iIi.mi 

Wilmv.. I. MlllN ION. Is,,ime. 
I nsl Imlff ol san| ( 'oml. Hits 
eif'lileenlh dav ol l.iini.nv l'1/l 

I'.inK (iav 
KeKislei 
l/.'S .»/l K//«' 



(OMMONWI Al III Ol 

MASSAI III ISITTS 

Nollolk.ss. Ptohale < mill 

10 all pel sons nileusled in Ihe 
eslale ol KICIIAKD J. HAKKY also 
known as KKIIAKD I. HAKKY. IK., 
lale ol Uiiimv in vml Coimlv. 
det eased. 

A petition lias Keen piest-nl.tl |o 
vml Com I lot pioKate ol a leitam 
iiisliiimenl piiiptMliiif In he Ihe lasl 
will ol vml defeased hy KICIIAKD 
W. HAKKY ol Onimv in Hie Coiinlv 
ol Noilolk p iav nif thai he Ke 
appointed eveniloi Iheieol wilhonl 
f.ivnif. a sun* Iv mi Ills Inilltl 

11 vmi tlesiie In nh|i-i I Iheieto vmi 
oi void alloinev should til. a willlen 
appellant e in vml Coin I at Dedliam 
Keloie leu n't link in Ihe loienoon on 
I lie Iwenlv Insl dav ol li-hniaiv 
l'l/ I. Iln- ifluiii dav ol this t Malum. 

* Witness. I IOIIN ION. Isipiut-. 
Insl I n tlfe ol said ( oiiil. tins 
sislfiiilh dav ol lannaiv I')/ I. 

I'.ml ( '. ( .av 
KffisK-i 

i/.*s m k//» 

( OMMONWI Al I II Ol 

MASSACIIUSI ITS 

Noilolk. ss. I'loKalt- ( 'oml 

I'o all peisoiis nileiesleil in Ihe 
eslale ol l.l OKOI I (I I VI I AND 
lale ol Oimii v III vml Couillv. 
de. eased. And lo Ihe Alloinev 
(.iiifial ol Ihe Hnileil Stales. Olln e 
ol Alien I'li.peilv . il neeesviiv. 

A pelMioii has heen piesenleil to 
sanl ("Mil K. i pi. .half ol a i til. mi 
iiislnimeiil piiiptiiluif. lo Ke Ihe last 
will ol vml ihtiasfil Kv IAMIS M. 
IT I IS ol Oiiim v in Iln- Coimlv ol 
Noilolk piavnif I hit In- he appointed 
esetilloi Iheieol without fivillf a 
smelv on Ins Komi. 

II von tlesne In "l.|.i I Iln it'll, von 
oi vom .Mloimv shonltl III. a willtfii 
appeal .in. e hi said Conil M Hlooklllif 
lifloif I. n o't lot \ in Ihr loitiiooii on 
Ihe Iwenlv eif.hlh dav ol Mali ll 
l'l/ I. Iln- i. linn dav ol Ihis i il.ilnm 

Witness. I. IOIIN ION. Isiihiii-. 
Insl Itiilft o| m,,| (oml. (Ins 
Iwenlv eif.lllli tlav ol |le. enil.ei 
I')/.' 

Hennell V. Mt I aiifhlm. 
Kif.lslei 
l/ll IK .'S//I 

(OMMONWI A I I II or 
MASSA( IIHSI ITS 

Noilolk. ss 1'ioKale Conil 

lo all pel sons nileiesleil m |he 
eslale .. I WIIIIAM I* 
IT I /CI K Al II also known as 
Will IAM I'AIKK K ITI/(;iKAII) 
lale ol ( .limn v in said Couillv. 
tleteased. And lo Ihe Alloimv 
l.eneial ol (lie Hmled Slates. Olln e 
ol Alien I'lt.pcilv. il intesviiv. 

A |MlMl.Mi has heen pieseiileil lo 
said ('.Mill loi pii.li.Mi- o| a teiliiii 
iiisliiimeiil pnipniliiif. |o Ke Ihe lasl 
will ol said det eased hv IT OKI N(T 
M lli/(.l KAI D ol (^uiiitv hi tin- 
Coiinlv ol Noilolk piavnif. (hat she 
Ke appoiif|f,| f.e, nln\ Iheieol 
wilhonl fivnif a se.lv on Ini l.oml. 

II von .It-sue lo ol.|e, | Hlfl.lo voll 
oi voni alloimv should file a wiilttii 
appf.iiante m vml Conil al ll.ilh.im 
ImTihi' ten o't lot k m the l.n. -n.xm on 

the llnilv Insl tlav ol I. ,nv. l'l/ 1. 

Hie i.-liiin tlav ol the. t Milnm. 

Wilmss. I KMIN ION. Isipiiie. 

I'llSl lllllf.f ol villi Coin I. (his 

Iwenlv sevenlh t\.,\ ,.| |»eteml»ei 
l'l/.». 

Hennell V. M. I aiif.hlui. 

Ki'fisK-l 
l/N DI.>S//I 

(OMMONWI Allll or 

MASSAI IIHSI I IS 

Noilolk. ss. I'lohale Collll 

In all pel suns luleiesleil in Ihe 
eslale o| | AKI S. HH IK IN lale ol 
t.hnilt V ill villi Coimlv. de. eased. 
And lo Hie AHi.inev Ceueial ol Ihe 
Hinted Slatis. (Mine nl Alien 
I'lnptilv. M ne.fsviiv. 

Ihe i-M-t iili.i o| Ihe will ol vml 
tleteased has piesenleil lo said Conil 
Im allow. line Ins Insl and lm.il 
a. . ..mil 

II von desne i.. <*t«|t • I Iheiil" von 
oi vom Mloimv should hie a wnltf-n 
•ippeaiaiitf in viid (mill al Detlhain 
Keloie len n't Unk in (he loienoon on 
Hie si-vfiilli dav ol liluiiaiv. HI/ I. 
Ihe i.'Iiiiii ,| ; , v ..| ihis < Milnm. 

Witness. I. KHIN ION. Isipme. 
Insl I miff "| s .,„f ('null. j| m 
twenli st-ttiml tlav ol lie. em!.. a 
117.*, 

Hennell V. Mil aiif him. 
Hi-f.islei 
l/H IK ?5/7l 



471 
3100 



GOCMSS/f/i 



Thursday, January 25, 1973 Quincy Sun Page 23 



fOR THE ACT/ON 
YOU WANT 



LEGAL NOTICES 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of BENJAMIN STERIN late of 
Quincy in said County, deceased. ' 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by CEC1LE 
STONE of Quincy in the County of 
Norfolk praying that she be 
appointed executrix thereof without 
giving a surety on her bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the twenty-first day of February, 
1973, the return day of this citation. 

Witness, J. JOHN FOX, Esquire, 

First Judge of said Court, this 

seventeenth day of January 1973. 

Paul C. Gay 

Register 
1/25 2/1-8/73 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of CHARLES SHAW 
BATCHELDER, also known as 
CHARLES S. BATCHELDER, late of 
Quincy in said County, deceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will and one codicil of said deceased 
by JEANNETTE LAMOND 
BATCHELDER of Quincy in the 
County of Norfolk praying that she 
be appointed executrix thereof 
without giving a surety on her bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the twenty-first day of February, 
1973, the return day of this citation. 

Witness, J. JOHN FOX, Esquire, 
First Judge of said Court, this 
fifteenth day of January, 1973. 

Paul C. Gay 
Register 
1/25 2/1-8/73 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of ELIZABETH C. HOLMES 
late of Quincy in said County, 
deceased. And to the Attorney 
General of the United States, Office 
of Alien Property, if necessary. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for license to sell at 
private sale certain real estate 
situated in said Quincy of said 
deceased, and that the petitioner may 
become the purchaser of said real 
estate, in accordance with the offer 
set forth in said petition. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham, 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the seventh day of February, 1973, 
the return day of this citation. 

Witness, J. JOHN FOX, Esquire, 
First Judge of said Court, this 
twenty-eighth day of December 
1972. 

Bennett V. McLaughlin, 
Register. 
1/18-25 2/1/73 



SERVICES 



OIL DELIVERY 

Nashe Oil Co. 
Fuel Oil 
472-5968 2/8 




-•* 



Mti fir 



A. 

•£:::::: 

E.;..... 

a 

* 

i...., 
i...... 

ft* •••••• 

L. ...... 

H* • • • • • t 

R 

a 

f. 



MAIL TO: QUINCY SUN 1601 Hancock St., Quincy 02169 
WANT ADS PAYABLE IN AD VANCE... cash muit accompany order. 
Enclosed it, for the following ad to run _____ times. 

COPY 



for a* 



■ II 

» i 



Rates: 
Contract rate: 



$2.25 for one week, up to 20 words, St* each additional word. 
$2.00 per week, up to 20 words for three or more insertions of 
the same ad. 

No refund will be made at this contract rate in the event of 
cancellation. 

Deadline: Friday 5 P.M. for the following weeks publication. 

Please include your phone number in ad. 



FOR SALE 



HELP WANTED 



LADIES 

Earn $20 to $40 an evening 
and wardrobe twice a year as 
a Beeline Fashion Stylist. No 
investment. For appointment 
call Mrs. Ellis, 293-7810. 2/1 



Early American Combination 


Couch Bed. 


Sleeps 


two. 


Heavy Duty. 


$55. 


Call 


471-7017. 




1/25 



FOR SALE 



DO YOURSELF A FAVOR! 



Join our Fashion Frocks 
Family I Our Styles sell on 
sight. Earn $20 to $60 a 
night. No collecting, 
delivering, investment. Call 
545-3950. 2/8 



1960 Lhurs Sport Cruiser. 
26', sleeps two, head, sink, 
ice box, 135HP Chrysler, All 
equipment in excellent 
condition, needs paint, 
$2,200. 479-7152. 2/8 



INSTRUCTION 



TYPIST WANTED 

Accurate typist needed at 
once, five-day week, liberal 
benefits, periodic raises, 
Government Center office, 
Mutual of New York. 
742-7110. 1/25 

[Equal Opportunity Employer] 



Mind Dynamics, Inc. Alpha 
Brainwave Training. 
Relaxation, E .S.P., 
Awareness. For class 
information call Mr. R. 
Waldron, 235-7877. 2/1 



GUITAR 



Guitar lessons in your home 
by professional Guitarist and 
Teacher. Call 773-3588. 2/8 



Newsboys 

(And, NewtgirU, Too) 



WANTED 




1601 Hancock St. 

471-3100 



SERVICES 



SERVICES 



FLOORS & WALLS 

Linoleum, ceramic tile, formica, sold A installed. Hardwood 
floors laid, landed and finished. Many specials in our store. 
Wall Tie, carpeting, Armstrong floor coverings of all types 
at reduced prices. 

ART FLOOR COMPANY 

1 1 23 Blue Hills Avenue, Dorchester 

TA 5-6179 

Open 8:00 5:00 Daily 
doted Sat. 



ALTERATIONS 



Alterations done in my home. 
Reasonable rates. Wollaston 
area. Call 479-2539. 2/1 



HALLS FOR HIRE 



BOATS 



— 



AIR CONDITIONED HALL 
FOR HIRE. No. Quincy K.of 
C. Building, 5 Hollis Ave. For 
information please call 
328-5158 - 328-0087 - 
328-9822. 



Clearance prices on all 
boats. Storage & 
reconditioning of motors 
for winter. President 
Marine, 669 Southern 
Artery, Quincy. 773-5058. 

TF 



INSURANCE 



CARPENTRY 



If you have a basic 
homeowners policy for 
$20,000 and are paying more 
than $75.00 a year call 
282-4412 at once. Rutstein 
Insurance Agency. 



Licenced builder, 26 years 
experience. Repairs, 
remodeling t additions. No 
job too small, fa* estimates. 
Charles £***> irUTS*. 




KEYS MADE 



DOYLE ft LONG 



Pod 041 

ft 
Heating Equipment 

680 Hancock St., Wollaston 
Tel: 472-4800 



Locksmith on Duty 

GRANITE CITY 

HARDWARE 

1617 Hancock St., Quincy 

479-5454 



MATTRESSr> 



MATTRESSES-lmmed. 
Delivery • Can you use 
exceptionally good buys 
on king, queen, full or 
twin mattresses, beds, 
trundles, bunks at 
discount.* Brand names, 
S e a I y , Eclipse, 
Slumberland, Engiander, 
etc.; Bedding still our only 
business for over 18 years., 
open eves., Siesta Sleep 
Shops, 221 Parkingway. 
Quincy 

"F. 



TAILOR! 


G 


AL'S TAILORING 


'3-6915 


Alterations - 


rig S - 


Repairs for 


es & 


Gentlemen. C. 


ween 


9:30 a.m. & 


p.m. 


Evenings 6:00 p 


7:00 


p.m. Also Zippe 





TRAIJ 



DAMON P( 


C & 


TRAILER 


s & 


SERVICE. Chat 


•time, 


Road-cruiser, I 


Camel 


Travel Traile 


Motor 


Homes. Sales & 


Route 


18-Bedford St 


iington. 


878-0682. 








Page 24 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 25, 1973 

Gerald Giacobbe Visits Norway 

ntt . ^.. Netherlands and England while 

Navy Petty Officer Third on a North A 1 1 a n t re 

Class Gerald M. Giacobbe, son of anti . submarine warfare training 

John Bosco of 396 Sea St., cnjjse aboard thc aircraft carrier 



Quincy, visited Norway, the 



USS Intrepid. 




JANUARY 




SALE 

Still Going On-Drastic Reductions 

save 10*- 40 

Women's & Men's Uniforms 

3SS UNIFORMS 

1659 HANCOCK ST., QUINCY-471-0812 
Mon., Tues., Wed. I Sat. 9:30 - 5 JO Open til 9 Thurs. & Fri. Nights 



WOODWARD'S 

EXPERT 

FRONT END 

WORK 

AND 

ALIGNMENT 

niMtlNMntklittoiT 
Mky,M«s. 

TUEMHE: 773-1211 



NOTICE 

to the Residents of the 

City of Quincy 

The annual listing of ALL 
residents of the city. Seventeen 

years of age and over will begin 
On Thursday, February 1, 1973 

CENSUS TAKERS WILL CARRY PROPER IDENTIFICATION 

Per Order 

JOHN M. GILLIS 
City Clerk 

As required by Generel Lews, Chapter 51. Section 4 




BIGGEST 
EVER! 




GENUAL ELECTRIC 

FILTER-FLO* 
WASHER 



• I W»»V I tpia epeee~l • filler 

ft* Mdi •yeteee— «•#> Um-Imsc 

• hmoHt Pieee Cycle ««ftk 



for Accurate Color 

Pictures Automatically 

and Electronically 




18" Diagonal Picture 

• INS1ACOLOR' 

• Roil a round stand 
o p ti onal ai'astra coat 

*Tr*4MMrfc C mm * tWclrie C« 



Extra Fast Ice- 
Giant Freezer 




General Electric 
14.7 cu ft No Ffon 

Refrtftratur Frctae* 
Jet Freeze Ice compartment 
Slide-out Sheif 




Sleep in Quiet Comfort 

Fashionette 

10 Position Thermostat 
LEX AN Case newer-rust 
TOP Air OiSCharo* 
Use on US Volt Current 



The Best Name Next To Yourj 



HANCOCK TIRE & APPLIANCE CO. 

11*, FRANKLIN STRrrl. SOI 1H Ql IM Y 472 Pl'O 



$200,000 Too High 

Ice Rink, Education Plant 
Killed By Mayor Hannon 



Quincy's "proposed new 
physical education plant and 
skating rink went down the 
drain Tuesday. 

That was the day the city 
opened the bids for the general 
contract and found that the 
lowest was $200,000 too much. 

After a brief discussion of 
alternatives, Mayor Walter J. 
Mannonsaid the rink is dead. 

The low bid was $2,241,300 
submitted by J. A. Sullivan of 
Dorchester. 

The facility was to have 
included the skating rink, a 
physical education plant and 



IF YOU 

MISS US 
TONIGHT 



school administration offices. 

One of the alternatives 
would have been to drop the 
administration offices from the 
plan. 

It was the second time the 
city had rejected bids for the 
complex. 

Karlier bids were a million 
dollars more than the amount 
appropriated by the City 
Council. 

The structure was redesigned 
and new bids were asked. 

Mayor Hannon chose to 
reject the bids rather than have 
the facility redesigned again. 




You get a second 

chance tomorrow 

(We're open Saturdays 10-2) 



GiSnite^ 



100 GRANITE ST., DOWNTOWN 
Open Daily 1 1-6, Friday 1 1-8 
Saturday 10-1—471-3900 

440 HANCOCK ST., NO. QUINCY 

Open Daily 9-3, Friday eve. 5-8 

479-6040 




1 



WANT 
ADS 
I GET 

RESULTS 

CALL 
4713100 



Electrolysis 

PERMANENT REMOVAL 
OF UNWANTED HAIR 

• Face, Arms, Legs & 

Body hair 

• Safe, modern 
Scientifically developed 

short wave method 

• Consultations invited 
Male and Female Patients 

FREDERICK 
S. HILL, R.E. 

Registered and Licensed 
Electrologisl by 

COMMONWEALTH 

OF MASS. 

115] Hancock St., Quincy 

by Appointment only 

773-1330 



Hep*»« 



^Lt 



U*e 



OM» 



pie** 



tAobtt< 



We 

process 

your 

insurance 

claims 



ktbh 



196 Washington St. 
GLASS • QUINCY • GR 9-4400 



B & B REMODELING 

KITCHEN CENTER 



Complete Kemodeliny 
J(ilckenA & Eatkrooms 



V «i lo Fh« Aoj ■ , Pr, B -tr- 




• FORMICA TOPS 

• CABINETS • VANITIES 

• CUSTOM WOODWORKING 



Wi DttHji Tt Tht Specific 

Nttds Off Yiir Family 
FORMICA SPECIALISTS 

CALL 471-4956 

S3I WASHINGTON ST. QUINCY 



ftom Crane Public Library 

Quincy, Mass. 



^ervina ZJkt rf/etropotid \Jf ZJn.9 ~3ouih «3rt 



ore 







Vol. 5 No. 20 

Thursday, February 1 , 1973 



2uUat'& Omm KtcUtf Hem+t*jU% 



■ — • 



5 



fl 



QCBPA Gives Financial Green - Ligrfci 



m 



Downtown Redevelopment Master Plan Study Starts 




FRONT LINE GIRLS were one of the hits at the "Hello America" minstrel show of St. Boniface parish 
at Broad Meadows Junior High School. From the left are Patti Foley, Joanne Ross, Debbie Bacon, 
Imelda Greenan, Susan Connally, Janice Donahue, Breoda Kelly and Lorraine Hajjar. 

[Quincy Sun Photo] 

Ricciuti Has Fingers Crossed 

Quincy's Snow Removal Cost 
Running Far Behind Average 



The cost of snow removal in 
Quincy this year is running well 
below the five-year average -and 
that's why Public Works 
Commissioner James J. Ricciuti 
has his fingers crossed. 

Seems that the least 
expensive January in the past six 
years [$5,005 in 1969) 
eventually turned out to be the 
most expensive year for Quincy 
($473,137). 

And the most expensive 
January in that time ($95,948 in 
1968] kicked off the least 
expensive year ( $2 1 0,77 6] . 



The subject came up early 
this week as Monday's storm 
threat failed to materialize and 
Tuesday dawned clear and cold. 

"I recall the winter of 1969 
very well," said Ricciuti with a 
nervous glance at the cloudless 
blue sky. 

"We were doing fine until late 
February when we got hit by a 
whole bunch of snow storms, 
one right on top of the other. 
There were areas in Quincy 
where we couldn't get in with a 
snow plough." 



The estimated cost for snow 
removal (including labor, salt 
and sand | for the January just 
concluded is $17,000. 

Comparative costs for the 
past five years: 

January Full Year 

1968 $95,948 $210,776 

1969 5,005 473,137 

1970 54,777 312,422 

1971 73,800 313,513 

1972 8,073 310,700 



"I hope this doesn't jinx us," 
said Ricciuti. 



Most Aged Widows To Get More S S 



Most--but not all—aged 
widows and dependent widowers 
will get increased payments from 
social security starting in 
February, according to Frank 
Culkin, social security district 
manager in Quincy. 

"Widows don't have to do 
anything to get these increases," 
Culkin said. The increases will 
begin with checks to be mailed 
early in February. 

"Some of those who get 
increases may not get as much as 
they expected," Culkin said. 
"Questions we're getting 
indicate there's some confusion 
about widows benefits." 

Under the new social security 
law, increases will go to 89 



percent of the three and a half 
million widows who get monthly 
payments based on their late 
husbands' social security 
records, according to Frank 
Culkin. 

"About two out of five 
widows will get 21.2 percent 
more than they were getting," 
he said. "About half will get 
increases ranging from about one 
percent to 21 percent. 

The 21.2 percent increase will 
be paid to women who started 
getting widows benefits at 65 or 
later. 'They are women whose 
deceased husbands did not take 
retirement benefits until age 65 
or over or had died before 
becoming entitled to retirement 



benefits," Culkin said. "A 
widow who started getting 
payments at 62 will now get 
82.9 percent of her husband's 
benefit. Previously, she got 82.5 
percent." 

Widows who get no increase 
under the new law will be 
mostly sole survivors whose 
husbands would have qualified 
for minimum retirement 
benefits, Culkin said. 

The new law also applies to 
benefits paid to some 3,000 
dependent widowers "Like 
widows, dependent widowers 
can now start getting reduced 
benefits at 60," Culkin said. 



By TOM HENSHAW 

The way has been cleared tor a $45,000 downtown 
re-development study and master plan. 

A $3,000 commitment from the Quincy Center 
Business and Professional Association Tuesday provided 
the financial green-light for the six-months study by 
Charles G. Hilgenhurst & Associates. 



Until Tuesday, the planned 
study was $3,000 shy of the 
needed $45,000. 

The Boston urban 
development counseling firm 
will formulate a master plan for 
the orderly redevelopment of 
downtown Quincy stretching 
out on and off both sides of 
Hancock St. 

The study will be funded by a 
$20,000 federal grant to the city 
from the Department of Housing 
and Urban Development and a 
$25,000 commitment from the 
business community. An 
additional $4,000 for expenses is 
also federally funded. 

Individual members of the 
b uw HTfflia *1&m m u n i t y have 
pledged $22,000 and Tuesday 
the QCBPA board of directors 
voted to add the $3,000 to make 
sure that Quincy gets the 
Federal funds. The federal 
deadline for raising the matching 
funds is June 30. 

After his board of directors 
voted the money, the 
association's executive director. 



John F, Murray said: 

"This is a prime example oi 
mutually beneficial cooperation 
between the city of Quincy and 
the Quincy Center Business and 
Professional Association. 

"This type of planning means 
great things for Quincy in the 
redevelopment of Quincy Center 
and in the future economics of 
the entire downtown area, 
including the Tumstyle and 
Southern Artery areas." 

Mayor Walter J. Hannon, City 
Development Coordinator John 
J. Cheney and Geoffrey 
Davidson, director of planning 
for Quincy, appeared at the 
QCBPVs meeting in support of 
the study. 

"If we don't have a strong 
downtown area we are going to 
suffer," the Mayor warned. "I 
am totally committed to it. We 
need a strong commitment from 
the businessmen." 

He got it. 

The idea of studying the 
downtown area in order to 
develop a master plan for its 
(Cont'd on Page 3 1 



Quincy Students Paying Less 
On MBTA Bus Routes 



Quincy students are paying 
less to ride the MBTA's 
suburban bus routes this week. 

Beginning Monday, students' 
and children's fares went to a 
flat 15 cents with free transfer 
privileges within the suburban 
division, that is, within the 
former Eastern Mass bus routes. 

Prior to that the youngsters' 
fares were 15 cents with no free 
transfer and with a zone fare 
system. 



The MBTA defines pupils as 
those taking courses toward a 
high school diploma and 
children as those from five to I I 
years old inclusive. 

The one restriction remaining 
on the fare schedule is that free 
transfers are not allowed 
between a suburban route and a 
rapid transit line or an urban 
route. 



Joy For Two Quincy Families; 
Anxiety For Two Others 



The long wait is almost 
over for two Quincy families. 

For two others, a new wait 
is just beginning. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles A. 
Stratton of 54 Bowdoin St. 
were notified Saturday that 
their son, Navy Commander 
Richard A. Stratton, is listed 
by the North Vietnamese as a 
prisoner of war to be 
repatriated. He was a prisoner 
since 1967. 

Dr. and Mrs. James 
Brudno of 3 Buckingham Rd, 
Wollaston, heard the same 
day that their son, Lt. 
Fdward A. Brudno, will soon 
be home. His Air Force 
Phantom jet was shot down 
in October, 1965. 



They are the happy ones. 

For Mr. and Mrs. Alfred 
Bifolchi of 120 Willard St. 
and Mr. and Mrs. Ernest W. 
Ricker of 14 Presidents Lane 
it was just another day. Their 
sons are still missing. 

Air Force Capt. Charles L. 
Bifolchi disappeared on his 
95th mission over Vietnam in 
January, 1968. 

Navy Lt. William E 
Ricker, a flight surgeon, 
likewise vanished ove. 
Vietnam on Oct. 28. 1968, 

Their names were not on 
the list of POWS released b> 
the North Vietnamese 
Saturday. 

The wait goes on. 



Page 2 Quincy Sun Thursday, February 1, 1973 




Brett Wants Quincy 
'Out' As College Site 



Rep. Joseph E. Brett 
|D-Quincy| has suggested thai a 
proposed South Shore 
Community College be 
established, not in Quincy, but 
farther down the shore around 
Marshfield, Norwell or Hanover. 



Brett' 
contained 
William C, 
the State 



s suggestion was 
in a letter to Dr. 
Dwyer, president of 
Board of Regional 



Community Colleges. 

"As the proposed college is 
planned to serve the area 
between Boston and Plymouth," 
he wrote, "it does not seem 



sensible to me to locate it on the 
fringe of the area such as ii 
would be if it is to be located in 
Quincy. 

"To me, it would be more 
sensible to place it somewhere 
near the center of the area which 
it is to serve, perhaps around 
Marshfield, Norwell, Hanover 
etc." 

Quincy and Community 
College officials are scheduled to 
meet soon to discuss 
establishment of the school. 

Present proposed site is the 
Broad Meadows area in 
Merry mount. 



Quincy IRS Office Open Extra 
Hours To Assist Taxpayers 



PRESIDENTS COUNTY - John J. Sullivan Jr. of Quincy, Executive Secretary to Norfolk County 
Commissioners, Commissioner Thomas K. McManus of Norwood; Chairman James J. Collins of Milton 
and Commissioner George B. McDonald of Quincy receive official notice from House Speaker David M. 
Bartley and John F. X. Davoren, Secretary of the Commonwealth, through Rep. Robert B. Ambler |Dl 
Weymouth and William A. Connell Jr. [D] of Weymouth that Norfolk County is now officially known 
as "The County of Presidents". 



m 






Ask $121,000 
To Study Quincy 
Coastal Streams 



The U.S. Army Corps of 
hnginecrs has requested 
SI 2 1.000 to continue a study -I 
Quincy *s coastal streams during 
fiscal 1 974. it has been disclosed 
bv Congressman James A. Burke 
ID-Miltonl. 

The study, which is the first 
stop in a SI I to $12 million 
dollar flood control project, 
began in fiscal 1 ( >?2 with a 
$20,000 appropriation and 
continued through fiscal 1973 
with a S75. 000 appropriation. 



The Internal Revenue Service 
will give extra assistance to 
taxpayers this year, announces 
Ron (iiunta, manager of the 
Quincy IRS office, I Cliveden 
St., Quincy Center. 

Giunta said the taxpayer 
service will be available Monday 
through Friday from 8:30 a.m. 
to 5 p.m. and on Saturdays from 
8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

The Cliveden St. office will 
also be open Friday evenings 
until 9 p.m. in February and 
April. There will be 9 p.m. hours 
also on Monday, April 16 and 
Tuesday, April 1 7. 

"This extia assistance is in 
keeping with IRS' theme of 'we 
want to help'," Giunta said. 
'The Internal Revenue Service is 
providing additional help for 
taxpayers across the nation this 
filing period and the extra hours' 
program is one way of doing 
so." 

Giunta pointed out that 40 
percent of Massachusetts 
taxpayers this year will be able 
to use the new Form 1040A 
which has been reintroduced. He 



said taxpayers whose income is 
only from wages and have no 
more than $200 ot interest 
income or $200 in dividends 
may use the 1040 A. 

The standard deduction has 
been increased to 15 percent, 
limited to a maximum of $2,000 
or $ 1 ,000 in the case of a married 
person filing separately. 

Giunta siad that the amount 
allowed for personal exemptions 
and exemptions for dependents 
has been increased to $750 this 
year. 

He said that persons must file 
a return if they are single and 
their gross income is at least 
$2,050; married [or a single 
person 65 or olderl with gross 
income of at least $2,800; 
married where one is 65 or older 
and have a gross income of at 
least $3,550 or a married couple 
where both are 65 or older with 
gross income of at least $4,300. 

Persons may call the Quincy 
office at 472-9032, 479-5028 or 
visit the Taxpayer Assistance 
Office at 1 Cliveden St., for free 
service in filing a 1972 Federal 
return. 



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BARKER'S 



53>* Dysart St., Quincy, has 
graduated from basic training at 
the Marine Corps Recruit Depot 
at Parris Island. S.C. 

He is a former student of 
Quincy Vocational Technical 
High School. 



IF YOU 

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Barker's • far a vast assort- 
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gift wraps and home de- 
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QCBPA's $3,000 Gives 
Green-Light For 
Downtown Study 



Thursday, February 1 , 1972 Quincy Sun Page 3 



| Cont'd from Page 1| 



revival has been in the woiks for 
a couple of years, ever since a 
Harvard graduate school project 
team suggested that it was the 
right time. 

With the MBTA extension 
ind improvement of access 
roads, the Harvard group 
reported, Quincy has an ideal 
opportunity to take a step 
forward to a healthy and viable 
downtown section. 

"We have problems in tht 
downtown area that can hurt us 
in competition with the regional 
shopping plazas," conceded 
planning director Davidson. 

"It is generally mediocre in 
appearance because of its age. 
Access and traffic patterns can 
be difficult, even frustrating. It 
is not the best place to get to 
and to get around. 

"We are trying through this 
program to develop a series of 
improvements with public and 
private funds to upgrade the 
downtown area and make it a 
better place to shop and do 
business. 

"If we do not take this step, 
we can already see what can 
happen. We are starting to lose 
businesses, like Kresges. If we sit 
back and do nothing, we will see 
more businesses move away. 

"When business leaves, we 
lose tax revenue. And when we 
lose tax revenue then the area is 
less attractive to new business. 
The deterioration spirals. With 
this program, we are trying to 
turn the trend around. 

The first step was the hiring 
of Charles G. Hilgenhurst & 
Associates as i jit ...^st 
experienced and best qualified 
firm to make the study. 

Hilgenhurst himself was a key 
aide to former director Edward 
Logue of the Boston 
Redevelopment Administration 



when the BRA planned the 
design, engineering and 
construction of Boston's 
Government Center. 

With a staff of experts drawn 
from the BRA, Hilgenhurst has 
done work for the cities of 
Cleveland and Niagara Falls, 
N.Y., and with the New York 
State Development Corporation. 

The firm's work with Quincy 
will begin immediately and take 
about six months to complete, 
culminating in a "strategy for 
development," or a master plan 
for the organized development 
of the downtown area. 

So, for the next few months, 
people from Hilgenhurst will be 
wandering around downtown, 
taking inventory of its assets and 
problems, talking with 
businessmen and civic leaders to 
determine the direction the city 
wants to take. 

After that, there is the 
problem of identifying the tools 
to be used to implement the 
plan and the sources of funds, in 
both state and federal programs, 
that can be used to put the plan 
in operation. 

"There has to be outside 
money to make these things 
work," said Davidson. "The plan 
has to be substantially financed 
from outside the city, that is, 
with state and federal funds." 




OFFICERS of Quincy Firefighters Local 792, AFL-CIO, installed at annual banquet at Morrisette 
Legion Post are Thomas Gorman, secretary; Peter Quinn, vice-president; James Donovan, president and 
George Lamb, treasurer. 

[Quincy Sun Photo] 

Quincy's Drinking Water 'Excellent' 



For Home 
Delivery 

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Call 
471-3100 



There is no need to worry 
about the quality of drinking 
water insists Water Supt. Owen 
Ha ton and Public Works 
Commissioner James J. Ricciuti. 
The pair issued the flat 
statement jointly, Monday in 
response to fears expressed by 
the Quincy Citizens Association. 

Officials of the QCA declared 
last week in the Quincy Sun that 
"Quincy has been among the 
three cities having the worst 
quality of water in 
Massachusetts" and they asked 
Health Commissioner Dr. Alfred 
V. Mahoney what steps have 
been taken to improve it. 

"The quality of Quincy's 
drinking water is excellent," said 
Haton and Ricciuti. 

"Bacterial water samples are 



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With the many types of insurance plans offered-your prescription probably is 
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Our records will enable you at any time to produce proper and accurate receipts- 
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taken from 31 different spots in 
the Quincy distribution system 
every week, more than 120 a 
month, and are sent to the 
Lawrence Public Health Testing 
Station. 

"ThJ bacterial count is zero." 
Eaton acknowledged that 
Quincy had been put on the 
Federal Environmental 
Protection Agency's list of 
places where interstate carriers 
I ships, trucks, etc. | are 
prohibited from taking on water. 



This, said laton, was because 
two of the seven storage tanks in 
the system were not covered. 
They have since been covered, 
he said, and prior to that they 
were chlorinated every day in 
compliance with Slate Public 
Health regulations. 

The city has asked thai 
restrictions be lifted. 

"At no time," said Eaton and 
Ricciuti, "has there been any 
danger to citizens of Quincy 
from their drinking water." 



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Page 4 Quincy Sun Thursday, February 1 , 1973 



Sunbeams 



Insiders report the City Council will soon take action on the 
re-drawing of ward lines. 

Presently there arc six wards in the city, but under a plan being 
considered, the number will be increased to eight. The City Council 
will then be upped from nine to 1 1 members - eight ward and three 
at-large. 

Under the eight ward plan, ward lines will be able to closely 
follow neighborhood lines and preserve neighborhood identity. This 
would not be possible with only six wards. If re-districting were 
done under the six ward plan for example, Quincy Point and South 
Quincy would probably have to be split because of their small size 
and the fact that they are next to each other. 

With eight wards, each ward would be of roughly the same size, 
with between I I, (XX) to 12,000 residents. 

Although such a plan would in fact be a charter change, only City 
Council approval is necessary for it to be adopted. 

*•* 

ST. BONIFACL'S Show was a smashing success again this year - 
all performances were sold out. 

Tom Buckley, business manager for the show, was presented a 
Revere bowl by the cast. Also receiving gifts from the cast were: lid 
Rooney, director; Maryannc Dennis, choreographer; (Jay Sullivan, 
pianist and Mary Stanley, costumes. 

* * * 

JOHN COMLK, candidate for state Vice Commander of the 
American legion was honored last week at a testimonial dinner at 
the l.antana in Randolph, attended by an estimated X00 people. 

And Mayoi Waller llannon used the occasion to announce that 
Comer would be re-appoinled to his job as city assessor for another 
three years. 

VIRGINIA TRAINOR of North Quincy, who works in the city 
clerk's office under the college work study program started her 
student teachingat Quincy High School this week. 

* * * 

QUINCY BUSINESSMAN Tony Losordo and his wife Kathryn 

left this week foi an extended tour of South America. 

* * * 

RUTH PABST. supervisor of the City Flections Department, 
stresses the importance of hcing counted in the city census now 
being conducted throughout the city. 

The census is used for a number of purposes including: veteran's 
bonuses, voting, tax abatements, school purposes and certificates of 

residence. 

#* * 

A Rl D AND WIII1T bumper sticker spotted in Quincy Square, 
printed hy the Quincy Taxpayers Revolt, gives Quincy's nickname a 
new twist. Instead the City of Presidents, the slicker reads, Quincy. 

(it v of Taxes. 

* * * 

(ilRRY PI I SI I AW of Merry 'mount, special assistant to Boston 
Mayor Kevin White, will be one of the instructors this semester at 
the John Kennedy School of Government at Harvard. Her course 
will be on "Women in Politics". 

* • * 

Till' FOLLOWING poem was written thirty-nine yeais ago, 
dedicated to Larry Curtin who was then City Council president. It's 
as appropriate today as it was then. 

* • • 
"NATURLSGI.NTLLMAN" 

By I RANK LYNCH 

lie wisely yields opinions up 
To Reason's firm control 
His pleasures are of harmless kind 
Thai will not taint the soul. 

He may be thrown among I he gay 
And reckless sous of life; 
But will not love the revel scene 
Nor head the lawless strife. 

lie wounds no breasl with jeer t»r jest 
But has a courteous tongue 
Is social with the gray -haired man 
And merry with the young. 

He gravely rules the council speech 
Or joins the baseball game 
And shines as Nature's Gentleman 
In every place the same. 

* * • 

NOT MANY YOUNGSTLRS gel to see a collection of sports stars 
in person. But 14-ycar-old Ross Nobile. son of Vin Nobile, the West 
Quincy sporting goods proprietor did recently. He accompanied his 
father to New York for a sports show and saw: Muhammcd Ali. 
Hank Aaron. John Unit as. Al Oliver, Pee Wee Reese. Woodie 
Dumari. Muhammcd even tossed a playful punch al him. 

*** 

OBSERVATION via the Quincy Rotary Club newsletter: "People 
are funny; they spend money they don't have, to buy things they 
don't need, to impress people they don't like". 

*** 

SMI LI- DFPT: Jack Silverstcin. the North Quincy druggist and 
author notes: "Folk singers are gelling younger all the time. One kid 
is making records now who is so young, the only trouble site's got to 
sing about is diaper rash." 




Jack Anderson 

1972 Pulitzer Prize Winner for National Reporting, and 
Syndicated Columnist for The Quincy Sun 

# Shootings May Start Sect War 
% Get Set For Washington Reports 

# Soviets Pushing Missiles 



WASHINGTON - Police 
fear tlio slaughter of seven 
black Muslims in a fashiona- 
ble Washington home and the 
hin (hiv shout out a I a 
I'.rooklyn sporting goods store 
may he the beginning of a 
bloody holy war between 
rival sects. 

The seven victims belonged 
In a seel which has accused 
the Mack Muslim prophet. 
KM jah Muhammad, of 
preaching false doctrine. 
Muhammad preaches hatred 
against the whiles, whom he 
calls I he "devil." The smaller 
seel has condemned Ibis 
doel line and has criticized 
Muhammad for excluding 
whiles. 

The 'gunmen in both inci- 
dents have I icon linked with 
the Muhammad loyalists. 

Faoh before this o'uthreak 
of violence, both the FBI and 
Ihe Secret Service had antici- 
pated possible trouble from 
Ihe Muslims. One classified 
Secret Service report slates: 

"Despite leadership state- 
ments enunciating a policy of 
non-violence (until non par 
licipation in demonsi rations. 
I lie existence of an organiza- 
tion whose philosophy is 
directed toward race haired 
and whose members are 
organized into a paramilitary 
contingent, constitutes a po- 
tential for violence." 

The tola I adult membership 
of the Black Muslim move 
men!, according In the confi- 
dential files, runs between 
rijOOtl ;ili(l i;.f)(M». The Secret 
Service memos add: 
"Hecmiting efforts are pri- 
marily directed to Ihe lined U 
cal i»cl ; nndorpr i vi leged 
Nouroos and suspected or 
known criminals. There is ac- 
tive reeriiilmenl w;ilhin penal 
institutions." 

An FBI summary, stumped 
confidential, gives this back- 
mound on Ihe Muslim move- 
ment "Ihe Nation of Islam, an 
organization for representa- 
tives of the black race only, 
had its origin in Detroit. 
Mich.;, in the early |»30s. 
Headquarters is Muhammad's 
Temple No. 2. . r >:t:{. r > S. Ureen- 
wimhI Ave.. Chicago. III., which 
affords direction to numerous 
affiliated branches, com- 
monly referred to as Muham- 
mad's Temples or Mosques, 
located throughout Ihe Hutted 
States. 

"The leader is Ktijnh 
M u li a m in ad. s e I f - s I y I ed 
'messenger of Allah' and Ihe 
only divinely appointed 
loader of the black race in Ihe 
C.S.. who controls all policies 
and programs. Muhammad's 



For Borne 

Or Office 
Delivery 




Call 
471-3100 



teachings stress Allah Ki«l) 
selected him to lead Ihe so- 
called Nemo out ol slavery in 
North America through 
establishment of an indepen 
denl black nation in the VS.. 
the while man is the 'devil' 
and open enemy of Ihe black 
man; Ihe black and while 
races must be separate; Ihe 
while man. his government 
and religion will be destroyed 
by Allah through Ihe forces of 
nature in the 'War of Ar- 
mageddon', a war bclweon 
Allah and Ihe 'devil.' 

"...Muhammad and oilier 
Nation 'of Islam members 
have refused to comply with 
Selective Service laws, slat- 
ing I hat they respect the laws 
of the I' S provided thev do 
not conflict with NOl laws. 
They do not believe that 
government should force 
them to participate in wars 
when they have nothing to 
gain." 

'News' From Washington 

Now that Congress is back 
in session. Ihe voters at home 
can expect a barrage of 
"Reports From Washington." 
The representatives will send 
home solemn accounts of 
their activities, emphasizing 
their political conquests and 
legislative triumphs. Nothing 
will lie said about the voles 
I hey lose. Ihe meetings they 
miss. Ihe deals Ihey make and 
Ihe junkets Ihey take. 

Some of Ihe reports to con- 
stituents will arrive by mail 
The reports will be printed in 
ink-splattered printing shops 
deep in the bowels of Con- 
gress, where the tourists are 
never taken. Photographers 
are also provided by the tax- 
payers to record such historic 
events as the Millville High 
School's senior class calling 
on their congressman. 

Other reports will be taped 
for the radio-TV stations 
back home, liolh Ihe Senate 
and House provide radio and 
television studios. The TV 
studios offer an elaborate set, 
designed In look like a con- 
messional office, with a stun- 
ning view of the Capitol dome 
beneath a bank of cumulus 
clouds. The studios, of course, 
charge about ono-iwenlieth 
what Ihe congressmen would 
have to pay to a commercial 
studio. 

The taxpayers not only pro- 
vide print shops and radio- 
TV studios, at bargain rates, 
bul most Senators and Repre- 
sentatives use part of their 




federal payroll money to hire 
public relations men. In many 
offices, this media man will 
wrile all Ihe press releases, 
speeches, newsletters and 
radio- TV scripts. Busy 
legislators merely have to 
slip down into the basement 
to the TV studio, assume a 
suitably solemn expression 
and read whatever is handed 
to them by their press aide 
Congressmen justify all this, 
of course, as their solemn duly 
to keep their constituents in- 
formed. But the real purpose, 
of course, is In build up their 
political slock for the next 
election. 

Meanwhile, you may as well 
enjoy your "Ueporls From 
W&Hhtnglnn.'' You are helping 
pay for them. 

— Headlines and Footnotes- 
Soviet Missile Push - A 

secret Pentagon report warns 
thai Ihe Soviets are rapidly 
improving their missiles. Al 
the Moscow summit meeting. 
President Nixon agreed lo 
allow Russia a numerical 
superiority in missiles lo 
counter America's technologi- 
cal superiority . The Pentagon 
now claims that Ihe Soviets 
are catching up in technology . 
The Soviets, for example, 
have developed a stellar iner- 
tial guidance system which 
uses the stars lo keep missiles 
on an accurate course. 

Mills as Target — Former 
Sen. Fred Harris. D-Okla.. is 
now laying Ihe groundwork 
for a national campaign to get 
Congress to work in Ihe open 
rather than behind closed 
doors. Harris' new Populist 
Institute, we have learned, 
plans to lobby in the homed is 
tricls of Congressmen who 
hide I heir com mil lee work 
from their constituents, liar 
ris' first target likely will lie 
Wilbur Mills, chairman of Ihe 
House Ways and Moans Com- 
mittee. Harris has I old aides 
he will go personally to Mills' 
district in Arkansas to liring 
the point home. 

Otto Who? - Freshman 
Sen. Jim Abouro/k. D-S.l).. 
passed largely unnoticed at 
inaugural ion parlies held this 
month for President Nixon. 
The reason: Alxmrezk won' a 
badge that identified himself 
as Otlo Schmink. The Senator 
explained lo us I hat he fell 
people were more likely lo 
speak frankly with Otto 
Schmink. Average Citizen, 
than dim Abourezk. U.S. Sena 
lor. 



Published weekly on Thursday by 

The Quincy Sun Publishing Company 

1601 Hancock St., Quincy Massachusetts 02169 

Publisher and Editor 

Henry W. Bosworth, Jr. 

Advertising Director 
John B. Powers 

KM Per Copy - $3.50 Per Year - Out of State $4.50 P«r Year 

Telephone: 471-3100 471-3101 471-3102 

Second-Class Postage Paid at Boston, Mess. 

MEMBER NEW ENGLAND PRESS ASSOCIATION 

The Quincy Sun assumes no financial responsibility for 
typographical errors in advert isements but will reprint that part of 
an advertisement in which the typographical error occurs. 



Thursday, February 1 , 1973 Quincy Sun Page 5 



•Letter Box 

Opposes MBTA Attitude 
And South Quincy Station 



Editor, Quincy Sun: 

Quincy is growing. And its 
citizens are awakening to the old 
philosophy of politics. No longer 
can the unwanted legislation and 
actions be taken without 
question from the Quincy 
citizenry. 

The MBTA has arrived in 
Quincy. Along with it has come 
some changes for the good of 
Quincy. Some results have been 
detrimental to Quincy. In any 
event it has given Quincy rapid 
s transit to Boston. But the end of 
the line stopped at Quincy 
Square. This end location draws 
traffic from all of the cities and 
towns south of Quincy. This use 
by non-Quincy residents has 
produced greater traffic 
problems for Quincy. It also 
creates an adverse impact on our 
taxes with its assessments. These 
two facts alone make it 
imperative that the MBTA be 
pushed beyond Quincy Square. 
But not to South Quincy. 

When the news was released 
about the South Quincy MBTA 
location there were no plans or 
information released. At this 
time I circulated a petition in 
regards to this location. I found 
the people were mainly 
concerned about the traffic and 
the impact the assessment would 
have on the taxes. They want 
the MBTA to continue beyond 
Quincy Square but they want it 
to be located out of Quincy. 

On Dec. 18, 1972 a Public- 
Information meeting was held at 
Sterling Junior High School 
where plans, maps and 
information were released about 
the South Quincy MBTA 
location. With this proper 
information made available 
intelligent and responsible 
evaluation was made of this 
location. It became evident that 
this station location was not for 
the benefit of South Quincy or 
Quincy as a whole. 

This station is located to be 
an expressway station to service 
the commuting public from 
Routes 3, 128, 24, and 95. Very 
few Quincy residents would avail 
themselves of this station. This 
station is "designed to relieve the 
expressway of its traffic problem 
and solve Boston's internal 
traffic congestion. Yet Quincy 
will have to pay the exorbitant 
price by assessments, loss of land 
and revenue. 

On Dec. 9, 1972 The Patriot 
Ledger reported that Secretary 
of Transportation Alan Altshuler 
acknowledged that there is some 
local opposition to a South 
Quincy MBTA station but 
maintained that the facility will 
be built. 1 interpret this as being 
told that we are coining into 
your house and do as we please 
regardless of what you say or 
want. This is a far cry from 
Abraham- Lincoln's Gettysberg 
Address which says "government 
of the people, by the people and 
for the people." Contrary to Mr. 



Altshuler's beliet there is a great 
deal of local opposition as well 
as city wide opposition. 

Careful evaluation of the 
plans shows that one possible 
good may result from this 
location. The State in order to 
locate this station in South 
Quincy must build on and off 
ramps near Capen's Bridge to 
service this station. On and off 
ramps at this location is 
necessary for the Upland Road 
Extension to materialize. 
Without the ramps the Upland 
Road Extension may not be 
effective and probably would 
not materialize. The Upland 
Road Lxtension is vital to 
Quincy to solve its North-South 
traffic flow and to relieve the 
bad traffic problem on local 
South Quincy Streets i.e. 
Franklin St., Independence Ave., 
Kendrick Ave., School St., Water 
St., Penn St., Liberty St., 
Trafford St., Pleasant St., Brook 
Rd.etc. 

It appears that the State 
knows this and is holding the 
ramps as bait in order to locate 
the Station in South Quincy. 
The State blundered years ago 
when on and off ramps at 
Capen's Bridge were overlooked. 
This blunder should be corrected 
by the State without penalizing 
Quincy by forcing another 
unwanted station upon its 
citizens. 

The South Quincy Location 
presents many problems. No 
assurances have been given 
verbally, written or through 
passed legislation to answer 
questions i.e.: 

1. Is there a guarantee that the 
entrance and exit to the station 
be only from the expressway? 

2. Can Quincy be exempt free 
from assessment? 

3. Can Penn St. and Centre 
St. be made throughways? 

4. Can Quincy be reimbursed 
for its yearly loss of revenue by 
land taking? 

5. How about the flooding 
problem in the area? 

6. How about the marshlands 
and ecology of the area? 

Time has come where the 
people are aware of what is 
happening in government. No 
longer will they tolerate officials 
who will dictate what is to be 
. regardless of the will of the 
people. 

Several months ago I formed 
a committee to circulate a 
petition in regards to the South 
Quincy MBTA location. As 
chairman of this committee 1 
will direct its energy and 
resources to fight against this 
location. Presently MBTA action 
is stalled due to ecological and 
waste land laws. But I will 
pledge my committee to other 
organizations fighting this 
location in South Quincy. 

Abraham Lincoln said years 
ago, "Tell the people the truth 
and the country will be safe." 

Peter Gacicia 
20 Stanley Circle, Quincy. . 



A 'Thank You 9 From St. Ann's 
Senior Citizens Club 



Editor, Quincy Sun: 

A note of appreciation for 
the excellent coverage given by 
your paper to the activities of 
St. Ann's Senior Citizens Club. 

A large part of the success of 
any organization is due to the 



fact that the public knows of its' 
activities. 

We appreciate what you have 
done. Every best wish for a 
Happy New Year. 

Edna Buttimer Weidinann 

Publicist 

20 Kemper St., Wollaslon 



MAK'S TAILORS 

Custom Tailored Suits & Shirts 
EXPERT ALTERATION FOR WEN & WOMEN 

Monday thni Friday 70 BILLINGS RD 

Open 9: W - 6:00 P.M. NORTH QUINCY. MASS. 

Sat 9:30 *P.M. 



471-7514 



Consumer 
Corner 



By ROBERT H. QUINN 
Attorney General 

Fraudulent check-passers cost 
American consumers an 
estimated SI billion 
yearly-because the consumers 
must make up for this loss by 
paying high prices. 

In an effort to help generate 
public concern over bad check 
passers, I have joined a 
newly-formed organization-the 
Massachusetts Police Fraudulent 
Check Association-which is 
focusing its attention on this 
criminal activity. 

A central clearing house will 
be established so that MPFCA 
members will have instant access 
to photos, aliases, finger prints 
and other information on bogus 
check passers. Seventy-six 
percent of those arrested for 
forging checks have previous 
records for that crime. 

Accurate statistics on the 
total cost of phony check 
passing to business and banks are 
difficult to obtain. However, the 
following estimates give some 
indication of the crime's effects. 

• The American Bank 
Association estimates that 
fraudulent checks cost the 
business community— which 
passes the cost along to 
consumers-from $400 to $1 
billion yearly. 

• Checks totalling 
$1,108,000,000 are cashed each 
week in grocery stores 
throughout the nation. 

• An average of 10.5 checks 
are returned to supermarkets 
each week. 

• Grocery stores lose an 
average of $3,000 per year in 
bad checks. 

Even in its infancy, the 
organization has demonstrated 
the effectiveness of a 
coordinated crackdown with the 
arrest last month of two 
x-heck-passers. 

Sgt. Edward Mossman, 
MPFCA founder, apprehended 
the suspects who were 
subsequently charged with 
larceny of over $100. The bad 
checks totalled $563 cashed at 
the A & P, Stop & Shop, 
Hanover Liquor Store and 
Zayre's in the Hanover area. 

Mossman credits the fledgling 
organization for the arrests since 
it was through the cooperation 
of more than a dozen police 
departments that the men were 
taken into custody. These 
departments were holding 
warrants for one or both of the 
men and their descriptions had 
been circulated among members 
of the MPFCA. 




NEWSBOYS WANTED 
Hero's • chance to own extra 
money by building e Quincy 
Sun home delivery route. 

Telephone: 471*3100 



■MM 



Living, Today 

By Dr William F. Knox 
Personal Counselor 



"It's herd to believe that Shorty 
Potts and Paul Newman are made of 
exactly the same chemical content." 



'The Intellectual Gap' 

"Ed be absolutely thrilled if Dr. Welby's rating would drop so 
they'd throw him oft the aii." said Gordon. '•You're coming on 
rather strong," I said. "What's behind that?" 

"Because, Doctor. I'm tired of competing with Dr. Wclby...my 
wife is more tuned in to him than she is to me. Her mind seems to be 
at TV level. ..no higher. Many a. night I've wauled to throw a rock' 
through that thing that cost me a cool $(>00. She's no kind of 
companion!" 

There must be found an intellectual level where two people can 
relate to each other comfortably. ..with mutual respect. ..desire to 
learn from each other. ..eagerness lo enter into dialogue. Gordon 
didn't have this with Gladys. So.. .he was bored with his marriage. 

Perhaps there are many Gordons around. He wanted lo talk. ..so 
badly that he'd throw out a statemenl exaggerated oul of all 
reasonableness...just to get some dialogue going. He wanted to be 
challenged. ..to have Gladys throw in some new facts. ..new 
information which she had learned. ..to talk. Bui Gladys had no new 
facts. ..her intellectual level was the IV mind. "Is it that Gladys is 
menially lazy. ..that Welby on TV required nothing of her while 
Gordon expected her to think. ..and talk. ..and be a companion lo 
him?" lie wasn't sure. 

Gladys did do some talking. ..nothing that met Gordon's needs 
however. She would make generalizations. ..and meaningless 
shibboleths thai seemed intended to belittle and deflate the ego of 
her husband. .."You're just jealous thai you're not a IV star 
too". .."You're inconsiderate and selfish". .."You're just a big baby 
expecting my attention all the lime." Gordon reached a point where- 
her name calling didn't hurl him any more. ..he jusl felt enveloped in 
a slate of meaninglessness and boredom in the relationship, They 
both fell the intellectual gap.. .neither wanted to admit it. 

What possible resolution could be found for such a dilemma. ..the 
intellectual gap? There are so many Gordons aiul Gladyses trying to 
make it together. Sometimes it's lite Gladyses who are being bored 
by the sports mind. ..TV's Bonanza level addict. The TV level 
mentality hasn't much to offer the partner with a growing, leaning 
intellect. Gordon couldn't shrink his experience and learning back lo 
the TV level even if he wanted to. Nor could Gladys suddenly 
become an intellectual giant. 

One suggestion was for Gladys to recognize the gap. ..and begin to 
grow intellectually. The best way is experience. We told Gladys.. .gel 
out and rub shoulders with the real world. ..get a job. ..talk to 
people. ..become aware of LIFE. Then you'll have something to be 
interested in. ..something to talk about. Once the mind is stretched 
with a new idea it never returns to its Ibrniei size. Gladys began to 
stretch her mind. 

The second suggestion is for Gordon lo recognize that he can't 
expect lo have all his needs met in that one person. He was pulling 
too heavy a responsibility upon Gladys, lie began to develop other 
relationships.. .which in turn look a lol of pressure off Gladys. She 
fell more comfortable in her new personal expansion program. 

Within weeks these people came lo appreciate each other much 
mo re... regained respect for each other. ..bolstered the ego of each 
other. ..they talked together. The gap was closing. 

Welby's rating dropped" in Gordon and Gladys' home. ..because 
they found something betlei ...something real. ..each other. 

For Dr. Knox's new book, People Are For Loving, write him 
sending $3 to 320 Washington St., Norwell. Mass., 0206 1 . 

FOR YOUR COMMFNTS: Group Therapy or Private Counseling, 
write Dr. Knox at 628 High St.. Dedham. Mass.. 02020. or call 
320-5990,659-7505. 

• Youth Speaks Out 

• It's too bad that some of the spirit exhibited during sports events 
isn't used in other areas. When we graduate in June, the world will 
still have poverty, pollution, hatred and ignorance. 

• The POW's will be home soon lo start new fighting - for 
employment. 

• Derek Sanderson may be welcomed back to Boston with open 
arms - the team management or the female fans? 

• It's really sad that so many people think that the phrase -"We've 
always done it this way" is a logical answer lo a question. 

Quincy and North Quincy High just finished Mid-Year exams, which 
for most students are about as worthwhile as trying to find a seat at 
lunch in the cafeteria. 

• It's hard to believe that nearly 12 years ago most people in the 
world didn't know what oi where Vietnam was. 

Q.H.S. Journalism Class 



birth 

defects 

are forever. 




march of Dimes 



unless you help. 



THIS »*AC« COWT«I«OT«0 •» TM« FU»LI«MM 



Page 6 Quincy Sun Thursday, February 1 , 1973 




ENGAGED - Mr. and Mrs. Barnett Aaron of 41 Homer Rd, Quincy 
announce the engagement of their daughter, Janet Beth, to Russell 
Sobelman, son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Sobelman of Tewksbury. She 
is the granddaughter of Mrs. Eva Isgur of Quincy, and Mrs. Tillie 
Aaron of Chelsea. The bride-to-be is a senior at the University of 
Massachusetts, Amherst. Her fiance is a graduate of the University of 
Massachusetts, Amherst, where he is a candidate for his Master's 
Degree. He is currently employed as Director of Campus Center 
Travel. A May 27 wedding is planned. 

[Modern Photo] 

LaLeche League To Meet 
Feb. 6 In Wollaston 



LaLeche League of Quincy 
will hold its first meeting of a 
four-part series Feb. ft at 8 p.m. 
at the home of Mrs. John 
Cogswell, 226 Fayette St.. 
Wollaston. 

T h e a d v a n t a g e s o f 
breastfeeding for mother and 
baby will be discussed. All 
interested women, nurses, 
grandmothers, mothers are 
welcome. Questions and 
discussions are encouraged. 

LaLeche League is a 
non-profit, n o n - s e c t a r i a n 



organization of women which 
gives advice and encouragement 
to women who wish to 
breastfeed their babies. 

On March 2$ the league will 
sponsor a film program on 
"Talking About Breastfeeding" 
and "Childbirth For The Joy Of 
It", at the Sons of Italy Hall, 
Mingham. 

Further information may be 
obtained from the moderator, 
Mrs. Donald A. Wilkinson of I 7 
Dale Ave., Quincy or from Mrs. 
Cogswell. 



Joseph Biagotti, Dr. Edward Pierce 
Join Quincy Kiwanis Club 



A businessman and an 
educator were inducted into the 
Kiwanis Club of Quincy Monday 
at 12:15 p.m. ceremonies in the 
Quincy YMCA. 



They are Joseph Biagotti of 
Granite City Electric Co. and Dr. 
Fdward Pierce, president of the 
Quincy Junior College. 



i **&» 



.4 ! ^w\i? 



L. 



Take Advantage of Your 

all Qf discount 

1 il I /rt coupon 

PUT LIFE 

INTO YOUR HAIR 

WITH A 

FROSTING 

or PERMANENT 

and RESTYLE %^_ ^] 

for A NEW YOU 

Appointment or Walk-In Service 

RUSSELL EDWARDS 

Hair Stylist 
M „ 27 COTTAGE AVENUE 

M»n'» r. -rt j * ■ ™; 472-1500 

H.I. Stylin, 0|Mn *""*" E " n,n «« 472-9544 



Marriage 
Intentions 



William J. Kern Jr., 451 
Buckminister Drive, Norwood, 
conduction engineer; Sheila A. 
O'Malley, 84 Fdgemere Road, 
Quincy, office manager. 

Francis P. Goodfellow, 29 
Marked Tree Road, Needham, 
revenue rep.; Donna R. 
Mac Donald, 334 Rock Island 
Road, Quincy, clerk typist. 

Timothy D. Hooker, 101 
90th Ave., Mipneapolis, Minn., 
U.S.Navy; Linda J. Spano, 86 
Turner St., Quincy, nurses aide. 

Thomas M. Reynolds, 240 
BeaJe St., Quincy, warehouse 
worker; Judith A. Fldredge, 101 
Taffrail Rd, Quincy, student. 

Robert J. Fitzgerald, 102 
Ruggles St., Quincy, truck 
driver; Maureen P. Diver, 12 St. 
Margaret's St., Dorchester, 
secretary. 

John J. Coleman III, 19 Paul 

St., Bra in tree, truck driver: 

Susan L. Remick, 576 Quarry 
St., Quincy, clerk. 

Frances McDonald 

Chairman For 
Catholic Supper 



The Boston Catholic Alumni 
Club will hold an old-fashioned 
grange supper |Fcb. 31 at 6:30 
p.m. at the club's headquarters 
at 761 Harrison Ave., Boston. 

Miss Frances McDonald of 50 
Baker Ave., Quincy, is chairman 
of the event, the proceeds of 
which will go to the Pine Street 
Inn, an organization supported 
by the Association of Boston 
Urban Priests. 

Tickets should be obtained 
from Miss McDonald before 
Thursday (Feb. 1 ]. 

Hilma Nord 
Chairman Granite 

Grange Dance 

Hilma Nord was chairman of 
the recent dance sponsored by 
Granite City Grange at the 
Senior Citizen Drop-In Center. 

Lecturer Mrs. Sadie Wesley 
presented a memorial program at 
the group's recent meeting. 



Your radiance, 
glows on 
this day. 
You are a 

lovely vision, 
and your 
flowers 
perfection, 
he cause 
they come 
from 



Norfolk 
Flower 



r. t 



Shop 



41 Beala Strttt 
Wallastaa. Matt. 
472 III! 472-7111 




MARRIED - Mrs. Matthew P. DeLuca is the former Stephanie 
Berlucchi, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Francis Berlucchi of 30 Bittern 
Rd, Quincy. Her husband is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Francis DeLuca 
of 359 Franklin St., Quincy. The bride is a graduate of Quincy High 
School and is working as a surgical technician at Quincy City 
Hospital. Mr. DeLuca is also a graduate of Quincy High School and is 
employed as a stone and brick mason with DeLuca Brothers. The 
DeLucas will live in North Quincy. 

[Miller Studio] 

'Cafe Shalom' To Feature 
Israeli Music On Feb. 4 



"Cafe Shalom", an Israeli 
style teen cafe re-opens its doors 
Sunday night, Feb. 4. 

The Cafe, at the South Area 
Jewish Community Center, 10 
Merrymount Rd, Quincy Center, 
is a new program by and for 
teens of the South Area. 

The program, to be held from 
7:30 to 9:30 p.m., will feature 
Israeli music, food, games, 



movies and dancing. A 50 cent 
admission fee covers all of the 
above expenses. 

Teens interested in helping or 
wishing more information about 
Cafe Shalom should contact 
Judy Feierstein at the South 
Area Jewish Community Center, 
10 Merrymount Rd, Quincy, at 
773-3000. 



Blue Hills Pomona Grange 
Observes 25th Anniversary 



Blue Hills Pomona Grange 
observed its 25th anniversary at 
a recent meeting at Brookville 
Grange Hall. 

State Master and Mrs. C. 
Wesley Thayer of Feeding Hills 
led the list of invited guests 
which included state officers and 
masters. 

Mrs. Maybelle Cedeiholm was 



soloist, accompanied at the 
piano by Mrs. Lillian Single. 

The Gentry Quartet of 
Canton also entertained. 

Congratulations were 
extended to Mr. and Mrs. Robert 
Anderson on their 36th wedding 
anniversary. 

The lodge will meet Feb. 3 
for home and community night. 






PERMANENT REMO^ 
OF UNWANTED HOT 
. Lola F. Kilduff, RE. 

Registered and licensed Electrologist 

For Mm and Women 
By Appointment Only - Day or Evening 
Consultations Invited 



fatenfa* 



Fasaiea Sheepa 

1531 fenced St., Qufecy 
Mm. Tim Sat. II - f 
Tfcirs. ft Fri. Til I 

CLEARANCE 
SALE 

Suits, Dresses 
and Robes 

20% to 50% Off 

Sizes 9-20 




Many different stylei! 



"■ 




Thursday, February 1, 1973 Quihcy Sun Page 7 



ENGAGED - Mr. and Mrs. John A. Osterman of 26 Carolyn Rd, 
South Weymouth, announce the engagement of their daughter, 
Karin Ann, to Michael Arnold Pilla Jr. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Michael A. Pilla of 30 Summer St., Quincy. Miss Osterman is a 
graduate of Weymouth South High School and attends the 
University of Massachusetts. Mr. Pilla is a graduate of Quincy High 
School and Massasoit Community College and is employed at Baker 
Bros. Inc., of Canton. An Aug. 10 wedding is planned. 

[Loring Studios] 

Quincy Hadassah To Hold 
Donor Luncheon In May 



A meeting was held recently 
at the home of Mrs. B. Robert 
Levin to plan the Quincy 
Chapter of Hadassah's 38th 
annual donor luncheon to be 
held in May, at Anthony's Pier 
4, Boston. 

Proceeds from the luncheon 
support the ultra-modern i 
facilities of the Hadassah 
Hospital and Medical Center 
complex in Israel. Hadassah 
Hospital, which cares for the 
health needs of both Arabs and 
Jews, regardless of ability to 
pay, also conducts intensive 
research into the causes and- 
cures of heart disease, cancer, 
organ transplant rejections,' 
diseases of the eye, and enzyme 
deficiency diseases. 

Dr. Alexander Russell, Chief 
of the Department of Pediatrics, 
said recently at a speech in New 
York before the Hadassah 



Medical Organization Committee 
that, in the Jerusalem Child and 
Family Development Center at 
Bet Straus, since 1970 when it 
was established, every single 
child in Jerusalem born 
malformed or handicapped 
receives without charge the 
necessary care and treatment. 

The committee making plans 
for the affair includes the 
Mesdames: Mrs. Leon Aronson, 
Mrs. Morton Bernstein, Mrs. 
Arthur Constant, Mrs. Herbert 
Hodess, Mrs. Milton Katz, Mrs. 
Ralph Kolodny, Mrs. B. Robert 
Levin, Mrs. Stephen Needel/Mrs. 
Eliot J. Robinson, Mrs. Gerald 
Rosenblatt, Mrs. Philip Shulman, 
Mrs. Stanley Sorkin, Mrs. 
Bernard Spiegel, Mrs. Irving 
Zieper. 

Chairman is Mrs. Martin 
Rutberg; co-chairman is Mrs. 
Henry S. Levin. 



Nancy Karp To Study In London 



Nancy Karp of 85 Dimmock 
St., Quincy, is one of 169 
students from 67 different 
colleges and universities enrolled 
in Beaver College's London 
Semester Program established in 

cooperation with the City of 
London Polytechnic and the Sir 
John Cass School of Art. 

The group will leave on Feb. 
3 from New York for 17 weeks 
of study in London. 



Open to both men and 
women, Beaver's London 
Semester Program is designed to 
provide American students with 
the opportunity to pursue their 
college studies while broadening 
their education through 
participation in a different 
cultural, social and educational 
environment. 

A student at George 
Washington University, Miss 
Karp's area of study is literature. 




At Quincy City Hospital 

January 22 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Chella, 
146 West Elm Ave., a son. 

January 23 

Mr. and Mrs. David 
deBettencourt, 85 Baxter Ave., a 
son. 

Mr. and Mrs. John L. 
Mazzarella, 47 Beach St., a son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Sherrill F. 
Munn, 122 Albatross Road, a 
daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Steven M. Bartz, 
63 Quincy Shore Drive, a son.' 
» 

January 25 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Collins, 
112 Connell St., a daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Vernon Mann, 
325 Washington St., a son. 

January 27 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas C. 
Kimball, 135 Quincy Ave., a 
daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Barry J. 
McGonigle, 39 Edwin St., a 
daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen C. 
Osborne, 338 Copeland St., a 
son. 

January 28 

Mr. and Mrs. Earl S. Bentley, 
16 Sumner St., a son. 

At South Shore Hospital 

January 28 

Mr. and Mrs. Miles W. 
Cosseboom, 274 Washington St.,. 
a daughter. 

At St. Margaret's Hospital 

January 19 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Abban, 89 
Robipson St., a daughter. 

Montclair Seniors 
To Meet Feb. 5 

The Montclair Senior Citizens 
Club will meet Feb. 5 at the 
Montclair Men's Club, Holbrook 
Rd, North Quincy. 

A social hour will start at 
12:30, followed by a business 
meeting at 1 p.m. conducted by 
Mrs. Louise Schell, president. 



m Emts 




1422 Hancock St.i 
Quincy, Mm 

773-2170 

• DIAMOND APPRAISING 

• ESTATE APPRAISING 

• GEMSTONE 

IDENTIFICATION 

• FREE CONSULTATION 

ROBERT a FREEMAN 
CERTIFIED GEMOLOGIST 
AMERICAN GEM SOCIETY 



AN INVITATION 
TO ALL D06SII 

A new grooming shoppe 

conveniently located 

in Quincy Center. 

DOGGONE LOVELY' 
12 Maple St.. Qiiftcy 

Professional dog grooming by 

a graduate of the New York 

School of Dog Grooming. 

Open Mon. - Sat. at 9 A.M. 

For appointments call 

Kathy at 472-9255 



THE FLOWER BASKET 
15 Foster St., Quincy 

OPEN SUNDAYS 
10-4 479-6082 
Flowers And Gifts Galore 





ENGAGED - Mr. and Mrs. Douglas S. Gordon of 41 Greenleaf St., 
Quincy, announce the engagement of their daughter, Miss Carolyn E. 
Gordon to Joseph K. Leuchte. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Paul A. 
Leucht of 27 Nut Island Ave., Quincy. A graduate of Quincy High 
School, Miss Gordon is in the graduating class of Quincy City 
Hospital School of Nursing. Mr. Leucht is a graduate of Quincy High 
School, served in the Navy two years, and is currently employed by 
Grass Instrument Co., Braintree. A June 16 wedding is planned. 

[Miller Studio] 

Today's Woman' Program 
For St. Ann's Marianns 



It will be a night for both 
homemakers and working girls 
Feb. 7, when St. Ann's Marianns 
hold their monthly meeting in 
St. Ann School auditorium at 8 
p.m. 

The program "Today's 
Woman" will feature microwave 
oven cooking, various uses of 
selected kitchen appliances, 
cooking with and sampling of 
wine, as well as many otheV 
helpful household hints. Z 

Mrs. Paul McDermott is 



chairman of the program which 
will be presented by food 
consultant, Kathryn Lynch 
McCarthy. The demonstration 
will be preceded by the business 
meeting at which time plans will 
be discussed for the gala 
Doll-Up-For-Spring Fashion 
Show to be held at The Lantana, 
Randolph, March 5. 

All women are cordially 
invited to attend. Refreshments 
will be served. 



St. Ann's Seniors To Meet Feb. 5 



St. Ann's Senior Citizens will 
meet Feb. 5 at 1 p.m. in St. 
Ann's Recreation Center, St. 
Ann's Rd, Wollaston. 

Clarence Edwards will show 
pictures he took of members at 



the Christmas party and 
installation. 

Committee: Mrs. Alice 
McLaughlin, Mrs. Francis 
Flaherty and Michael Cogan. 

Refreshments will be served. 



Quincy Sons Of Italy 
Social Center 

120 Quarry St. Quincy 

Newest function hall now available for weddings, showers, dinner 
dances. Main [Golden Lion] Suite has cathedral ceiling. Brides 
room - ultra modern sound system. Completely air conditioned. 

* FOR RESERVATION CALL 
773-2687 AFTER 2 PJK. 





On. of th» Mott REASON ABU FLORISTS 
on tht ENTIRE SOOTH SHORE 

FLOWERS 

for ALL Occasions 
CUT FLOWERS • CORSAGES • PUNTERS 

Arrangements 

for WEDDINGS • HOSPITALS 

FUNERALS 



337-0288 

OPEN SUNDAYS 



94 WASHINGTON ST. WEYMOUTH LANDING 



■ 



?, 






^ 






Page 8 Quincy Sun Thursday, February 1 , 1973 



Quincy Art Association 
Presenting Junior Art Show 



The Quincy Art Association 
is presenting its annual exhibit 
of a Juried Art Show of artists 
from the South Shore area. 

The exhibit will be held at 
the Thomas Crane Public 
Library, Quincy during 
February. It will be open to the 
public Monday to Friday from 9 
a.m. - 9 p.m. and also Saturday 
from 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. 

Paintings exhibited are 
originals and are both realistic 
and abstract compositions. 

The artists exhibiting are: 
I leanor V. McCarthy, Annette 



Pagliarani, Pearl Neves, Judith 
Klingelhofer, Barbara Banuk, 
Anita Coughlin, Beverly 
Lampert, Laura Olsen, Phyllis 
Stungis, Marilyn Tausevich, 
Olive Tompkins, Joan Thomas, 
Hugh MacFarland, Robert 
LeNormand, Ruth Beeman, 
Carol Bottary, Madeline Cohen. 
Mrs. Eleanor V. McCarthy, 
President, will preside at the 
Annual Tea for the opening of 
the yearly Quincy Art 
Association Fxhibit which will 
be held at the Thomas Crane 
Public Library. 



Milton Antiques Exhibit 
Set For Feb. 1-2-3 



The Milton Antiques l-.xhibit 
and Sale will be held I cb. I. 2 
and 3 at the First Parish Church, 
535 Canton Ave, Millon. 

Old china, glass, silver and 
pewter will be on sale from noon 
to 10 p.m. Thursday and Friday 
and from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 
Saturday. 

Some 30 exhibitors from 



Massachusetts, Rhode Island and 
New Hampshire will display 
merchandise. 

Co-chairmen for the event 
will be Richard B. Heath and 
Russell I . Poverty. Mrs. William 
Albers is food chairman and Mrs. 
I dgar Way is administrative 
assistant. 



COLPITIS SffiKfc 

1550 Hancock St.. Quincy 472-005 1 

Call Colpitis Now 472-0051 

Take A 
Bermuda Break 

In Rendezvous Time' 

We will be happy to 
arrange your vacation! 



►*?£*, 



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i 



Off Season Rates Are Now J 
In Effect Until March 





ENJOYING SOCIAL HOUR during St. John's Junior League annual progressive dinner are Mr. and Mrs. 
William Rogers, Mr. and Mrs. Ferdinand DeNicola and Mr. and Mrs. John Tormey. Mrs. DeNicola is 
president; Mrs. Rogers a committee member and Mrs. Tormey was a hostess at her Putnam St., Quincy 
home. 

(Quincy Sun Photo] 

Quincy Federation To Observe Education Day 



School Supt. Dr. Lawrence P. 
Creedon will speak at the 
lulucation Day meeting of the 
Quincy Federation of Women's 
Organizations Feb. 5, in the 
auditorium of the Quincy 
YMCA. 

Also on the speakers' list are 



Lloyd M. Creighton, principal of 
Quincy High School; Peter J. 
Chrisom, principal of North 
Quincy High School; and Mrs. 
Alfred T. Knapton, education 
chairman of the QFWO. 

A business meeting, presided 
over by Mrs. Melville C. Gamble, 



Wooddward School Entrance 



The Woodward .School for 
Ciirls in Quincy, now in its 77th 
year, will hold its entrance 
examination for the 1973-1974 
year Feb. 10 at 9 a.m. 

The school, located at l 1 02 
Hancock St., Quincy, serves 
students in grades seven through 
12. 

The tests-will be administered 



by Mrs. Clifford B. Millard, a 
faculty member. Mrs. Millard, a 
testing specialist, holds a 
Master's Degree in Psychology. 

Interviews with prospective 
students and their parents are 
personally conducted by the 
school's principal, Mrs. Eunice 
Gilford. 

The Woodward School, which 



HEALTH FOODS 

MOTHER NATURES 

589 WASHINGTON ST.. QUINCY 472 3651 

VITAMINS-SUPPLEMENTS 

Organic-Grains-Foods 

Granola-Wheat Germ 

HONEY-Gensing 



will begin at 2 p.m., preceded by 
a social hour. 

Hostess clubs for the meeting 
are the Quincy Emblem Club, 
Squantum Women's Club, 
Montclair Women's Club, and 
the Wollaston Glee Club 
Auxiliary. 

Exam Feb. 10 

has been open since 1970 to girls 
born outside Quincy, now has 
students from all over the South 
Shore area as well as Boston and 
the surrounding towns. 

In announcing the entrance 
exams, Mrs. Gilford noted, 
"Generous scholarships are now 
available for girls. They are 
based primarily on financial 
need and are offered to girls 
living in Quincy, Squantum and 
Wollaston. 

"The school specializes in 
giving students individual 
attention. "We are pleased to 
announce that we have a ratio of 
one teacher to seven students". 

''For over 76 years 
Woodward has maintained a fine 
reputation in providing a fine 
college preparatory course and a 
family-like atmosphere which 
fosters close relationships," the 
principal added. . 




ELLA 
EAUTY 




NOW OPEN 
AL0N (g 



549 WASHINGTON ST., QUINCY < 6 
punnir. 771 _/n»7 * 



PHONE: 773-0387 



Hours 



Appointment or Walk-in Service I 
: TUES.-wED.-FRI.-SAT. 9:00 to 5:30 p.m. Y 
m THURS. 1:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. u ] ' 




Please Let Us Introduce You To Our New 
Shop At Our Expense .. . 

I 1 . FIRST TWO WEEKS (Shampoo & Set) ^A PRICE 

». /2 price 

6 50 



2. FIRST MONTH ALL PERMANENTS 

3. FIRST MONTH ALL TINTS 




DERRINGER 

THE FLORIST 
Plants Arrangements h'htwers 

319 Hancock St. 773-0959 



The Cane 
Specialists. 




Need a cane or walker? 
At SICKROOM SERVICE 
we carry more than 50 dif- 
ferent kinds of walkers and 
canes to meet every 
special need. 



ICKROOM 
ERVICE 



SAM0SET SURGICAL 

SUPPLY CO. 

217 SamoMt Avenue, 
Quincy, 472 7200 




Thursday, February 1 , 1973 Quincy Sun Pa 



Fred Palmer Wins 
Disneyland Trip In 

Adam g Shore Contest 



Ten-year old Frederick 
Palmer of 160 Albatross Rd, 
Adams Shore has won a trip to 
Disneyland, Calif. 

Frederick won the first place 
prize in a "Believe In A Boy 
Contest" sponsored by the 
Adams Shore IGA Foodliner, 
494 Sea St. 

The contest was open to boys 
10 to 13 years old. 

Nicholas Phillips, store 
owner, also announced the 
names of the other top prize 
winners: 

Daniel Sullivan, 11, of 36 
Sargent St., Germantown.aSting 
Ray bicycle. 



Daniel Stewart, 10, of 6 
Chesley Rd, Adams Shore, a 
Zeboc rod and reel outfit. 

William Shea, 1 3, of 1 5 Swan 
Rd, Adams Shore, a football. 

Thomas Pitts, 12, of 18 
Eaton Rd, Adams Shore, a 
transistor radio. 

The contest involved a voting 
period of 10 weeks during which 
customers voted their cash 
register tapes. Each 10 cents of 
merchandise was worth one 
vote. 

Each child whose name was 
registered will receive a small 
prize. 




TOP WINNERS - Nicholas Phillips, owner Adams Shore IGA Foodliner, 494 Sea St., presents ticket for 
trip to Disneyland, Calif., to Frederick Palmer, 10, While Dan Sullivan. 11, shows off bicycle he won in 
contest sponsored by the store. 

[Quincy Sun Photo] 



Wre here to hdp ym 





William B. Harvey 

Clerk-Teller 



JohnC. Kennedy 

Su|M'i\isi>r 



Willard K. Myers 

Customer Relations 
Telephone Representative 



HANCOCK STREET 



MOBILE CUSTOMER CENTER 



If you've got an appliance, bill or service problem - or 
any matter you'd like to discuss face-to-face — we would 
like to help you. That's why 
the three of us are here in 
Quincy every Tuesday. 

Boston Gas now has a 
mobile customer center next 
to the Quincy City Hall, 
waiting to help you. 

Hours: 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. every Tuesday. 




QUINCY CITY HALL 




Bostongas 



MOBIL! CUSTOMER CENTER 



gas 




. . . where service makes the difference 




. 



•"■^■ I — 



Page 10 Quincy Sun Thursday, February 1 , 1973 



Ouincy High-Voc. Tech NEWS 



Written by members of the Quincy High School Journalism Class 



• Editorial 

Why So Many 
Parkinging Meters? 

Why does the City of Quincy have the distinction of being the 
one city in the United States with the most parking meters? 

That's right, you heard it first right here. Our beloved little city, 
has the unenviable honor of holding this title, one that should make 
our forefathers jostle in their graves, and make money jostle in the 
treasury of the city. It's hard to imagine that this small suburb of 
Boston with a population equivalent to about one 60th of New York 
City has that many money -hungry little machines. 

The most absurd aspect of the meters is the fact that it is 
probably killing business, but "helping" the city in its budget 
planning. 

Who wants to pay 10 cents to park his car, when all he wants to 
buy is maybe a pack of cigarettes or a stick of gum? Plus, the fact 
1 luit the South Shore Pla/.a with acres and acres of free parking is 
only a few miles away is also a deterring factor thai will take 
business away. 

Granted, parking meters are essential for a small city to survive, 
but an abundance such as we have is ridiculous and can only harm 
business as it stands now. 

By BRIAN SULLIVAN 

Tutoring Programs 
Enjoyable, Beneficial 



Non-English Speaking Students 
Learning With Help Of Volunteers 



By PEGGI DINEEN 

For the past few years there 
have been tutoring programs set 
up at the High Schools and 
Junior High Schools in Quincy. 

Students from these schools 
would spend one or two 
afternoons u week working as 
student teachers in elementary 
schools. 

This year at Quincy High one 
such program is being initiated 
by the Art Department. Some 
students taking art courses will 
go down once a week to the 
Parker fleincntary School. The 
program is not really to "teach" 
art, but to help the young 
students in whatever they want 
to do from painting to plays or 



puppet shows. 

From experience in a tutoring 
program that I was part of two 
years ago, I found that they 
work quite well. The children in 
the first grade class I worked in, 
both enjoyed and benefited 
from the program, and I know I 
did. 

It was easier for them to talk 
with me, because I didn't 
represent the same authority as 
(he teacher, and yet there was 
enough respect to get work 
done. 

I think thai these tutoring 
programs are one of the really 
worthwhile activities set up by 
the Quincy School System, and I 
hope they are continued in the 
future. 



This Page Is A New Feature For Quincy Sun Readers. 
Articles Are Written by North Quincy Students and Quincy High 
Students On Alternating Weeks 



By NANCY SIDDENS 

Unknown to many citizens of 
Quincy is the fact that there are 
non-English speaking students in 
the public school system. 

These students are from 
immigrant families that have 
moved here within the past few 
years. Not only are these 
students bombarded by a new 
language, but also by new 
customs, foods, and dress. For 
this reason many of them feel 
strange and separate from their 
new surroundings. 

At ^OHVTS a program has 
been organized by Mrs. Mary 
Ann Sofis and Ellis Swartz, 
coordinator of foreign languages, 
to help these students adapt to 
learning enjoyable. Learning 
could also take place in the form 
ot a conversation or a game. 

In some cases volunteers, 
benefit as much from the 
program as do non-English 
speaking students. Volunteers 
knowing Spanish and tutoring 
Spanish-speaking students get to 
learn more and improve their 
Spanish. 

The bilingual students arc all 
ages and speak many different 
languages. Some examples are 
Italian, Creek, Polish, Spanish, 
and Korean. Because of such a 
high percentage of Creek and 
Italian speaking "students, two 
bilingual teachers are already- 
employed to help with them. As 
tor the rest, the volunteers at 
QHVTS a-e doing their best to 
help them in their new world, 
and become pari of their new 
environment. High school 
students volunteer their spare 
time to work with them on 
learning to speak, read, write- 
and understand English better. 

Through this they not only 
learn English but make friends 
and begin to feel more a part of 
American life. The volunteer 
also gains a feeling of 
achievement by helping someone 



who needs an i really appreciates 
it He or she also learns of 
different ways of life while 
making a new friend. 

The materials used in this 
program are different with each 



student, depending on what he 
or she needs most. There are 
pamphlets on things such as the 
meaning of traffic signs and the 
structure of government, or 
there are magazines which make 



Going Places 




ANNA CARLUCCI, of 56 
Newcomb St., Quincy, a senior 
at Quincy High School has been 
accepted to Boston University. 
She is planning to major in 
Business Administration. Her 
goal is to become an accountant. 
Some activities that she is 
involved in at Q.H.S. are the 
prom committee, Spanish Club, 
A.F.S., and National Honor 
Society. She is also Recording 
Secretary of the Student 
Council. 



LISA KELLY of 83 Shawmut 
St., a senior at Quincy High 
School, has been accepted at 
Plymouth State College. She 
plans to major in mathematics. 
Her ambition is to become a 
math teacher. Lisa is a member 
of Tri-Hi-Y, the Prom 
Committee, and the 
"Goldenrod" staff. She is also 
treasurer of the "Q" Club. 



By LINDA DiSALVIO 



QHVTS Dance Feb. 10 
To Feature 'Rush 9 



On Saturday night, Feb. 10, 
the place to be is QHVTS, upper 
Voc-Tech gym for a super night 
of continuous dancing from 8 - 
1 1 p.m. 

The band to be featured is 



"Rush" 

Advance tickets will be sold 
Feb. 5 - Feb. 9 for $1.50. 
Tickets at the door will be 
$1.75. 

Hope to see you there! 




SYSTEMS 
SALE 



COMPONENTS-CASSETTE PLAYERS 
TAPE DECKS-AM FM RADIOS 
SOME DEMOS.- ONE OF A KIND 
FISHER-MASTERWORKS- 
CRAIG-GARRAD 




UP TO 



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Gift C«rt. 




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MUSIC SHOP 



1514 HANCOCK ST. QUIMCY 773-2011 

Monday - Saturday 9 to 5:30, Thursday A Friday Eves to 9 P.M. 



A GREAT 
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SALE ! 



We've started our "REMOVAL SALE"! 

This Week we are "removing" leather and suede 

Fantastic savings on every stvle. 




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QUINCY 

471 1666 

Weekdays 9:00 to 9:00 
Saturdays 9:00 to 3:30 



Amity Aides To Assist In 
Foreign Language Studies 



Thursday. February 1 . 1973 Quincy Sun Page 1 1 



The Amity Aide Program is 
one in which young adults from 
various countries come to the 
United States to share their 
languages and customs with 
students here. 

Each year Quincy receives its 
Amity Aides in January and 
they remain until May. There are 
three aides for each foreign 
language studied in Quincy. 
These are German, French and 
Spanish. 

German and French-speaking 
aides are from Europe but 
Spanish-speaking ones come 
from various Latin American 
Countries. Past aides have come 
from Honduras and Colombia. 

This years Amity Aides have 
just arrived in Quincy after 
spending the early part of the 
school year in various other 
American cities. They reside 
with people who have made 
their homes available to them. 
These people with the school 
system show American 



hospitality to these foreign 
visitors. 

The aides are assigned to the 
two high schools and five junior 
highs in the city at various times 
during the weeks. 

They talk with the students 
in their native languages, helping 
them to understand the language 
better. They also speak of their 
homelands and customs to open 
up a new world to the student. 

In April of this year the 
second annual International 
Festival of Quincy will take 
place. The aides help with 
constructing booths by giving 
information on their homeland 
and many dress in native 
costumes to sing or dance. 
Through this exchange of 
culture with many different 
lands the festival and amity aide 
program help work for peace, 
love, and brotherhood in Quincy 
and the world. 

By NANCY SIDDENS 



High School Guidance 
Offices Open 

Wednesday Nights 

Guidance offices at the city's Frank Bukunt, Voc-Tech. 



three high schools will continue 
to be open from 6 to 9 p.m. 
Wednesdays through March. 

Counselors will be available 
to assist parents of juniors and 
seniors with college and career 
planning. 

The evening schedule is as 
follows: 

Jan. 31 - Charles Baillargeon, 
North; Sylvia Stern, Quincy; 
Frank Bukunt, Voc-Tech. 

Feb. 7 - Joan White, North; 
William Hutchison, Robert 
Daniels, Quincy; Gerald 
Gherardi, Voc-Tech. 

Feb. 14 - Peter Fitch, North; 
Edward Nankin, Quincy; Marc 
Heyman, Voc-Tech. 

Feb. 28 - Richard Meyer, 
North; Helen Kelley, Quincy; 



March 7 - Joan White, North; 
Donna Cohen, Quincy; Gerald 
Gherardi, Voc-Tech. 

March 14 - John Murphy, 
North; Edward Nankin, Robert 
Nolan, Quincy; Richard Haines, 
Voc-Tech. 

March 21 -- Gail Braman, 
North; William Hutchison, 
Robert Daniels, Quincy; Mare 
Heyman, Voc-Tech. 

March 28 -- Charles 
Baillargeon, North; Helen 
Kelley, Quincy; Frank Bukunt, 
Voc-Tech. 

Any person wishing to speak 
with a member of the guidance 
staff may call for an 
appointment or come in 
unannounced. 



Burke Commends Volpe For 
$19.5 Million For Track Purchase 



Congressman James A. Burke 
[D-Milton] attended a ceremony 
Friday at the Department of 
Transportation at which 
Secretary of Transportation 
John A. Volpe presented a $19.5 
million check to Gov. Francis 
Sargent, for the purchase of 145 
miles of Penn Central track for 
commuter rail service in the 
Greater Boston area. 

These federal funds are made 
available to Massachusetts for 
the purchase of advance rights of 
way through a loan program of 



the Urban Mass Transportation 
Administration. Burke declared: 
"This $19.5 million federal 
loan will assist in bringing much 
needed commuter rail service in 
the Greater Boston area. 
Massachusetts is indeed very 
grateful to Secretary John Volpe 
for the part he played in 
securing these federal funds for 
our area." 



PERMANENT REMOVAL 
OF UNWANTED 

HAIR 

FREDERICK S. HILL, R.Ej 

"Registered and Licensed 

Electrologist 

1151 Hancock St., 
Quincy 

by Appointment only 
773-1330 





END MEN ham it up at St. Boniface parish "Hello America" minstrel show. Seated is End Lady Debbi 
Buckley. First row, from left, Tom Connolly, Jim St. Angelo, Richard Hebert, Brian Nevins and Bob 
Foley. Second row, Steve Connolly, Mike Blake, Keith Kennedy, John Megnia and Pat Nevins. 

[Quincy Sun Photo] 

St. Boniface's 'Hello America' 
Minstrel Show Smash Hit 



"Hello America", a minstrel 
show presented by St. Boniface 
parish, Germantown, drew 
appreciative audiences this week 
who gave it "a smash hit" rating. 

The show, presented 
Saturday, Sunday and Monday 
at Broad Meadows Junior High 
School, was staged and directed 
by Ed Rooney. Choreography 
was by Marianne Davis. 

Tom Kelly was interlocutor. 
End men were Michael Blake, 
Steven Connolly, Tom Connolly, 
Bob Foley, Richard Herbert, 
Keith Kennedy, John Megnia. 
Brian Nevins, Pat Nevins, Jim St. 
Angelo. End lady was Debbi 
Buckley. 

Flight crew were Nancy 
Hebert and Dorinda Norton. 

Front line girls were Debbie 
Bacon, Susan Connally, Janice 
Donahue, Patti Foley, Imelda 
Greenan, Lorraine Hajjar, 
Brenda Kelly, Joanne Ross. 

The chorus included: 

Sharon Bacon, Nancy Barrett, 
Judy Barry, Trudy Buckley, 
Mary Burke, Trudy Chlud/inski, 
Tom Connolly, Cathy Connors, 
Janet Crowe, Debbie Daggett. 
Jean DeAngelo, Marie Donahue. 

Laura Ducey, Mary Duross. 



Tom Duross, Bill Eklund, Julie 
Flibotte, Pat Foley, Mary Foye, 
Elaine Fredericks, Donna 
Gallinaro, Joyce Gallinaro, Mary 
Jo Gallinaro, Tammy Grindlc. 
Rosemarie Hanley, Nancy 
Hebert, Jim Kennedy, Robert 
Laneau, Nancy Long. 

Joe Long, Rosemary 
Maloney, Michael McLaughlin, 
Elain Michaels. Kathy McCourt. 
Joyce Mullaney. Bobby Nevins. 
Mary Nevins. Dot Nicholson, 
Alice Norton, Dorinda Norton, 
Rose Norton. 

Janice O'Neil, Susan 
Peterson, Denise Picot, Ellen 
Quigley, Jj m Quigley. Mini 
Reimers, Nancy Robertson, 
Robb Ross, Michele Sacchetti, 
Sandra Sacchetti, Nick Saccardo, 
Kathy Short, Betty Ann Smith, 
Greg Smith, Debbie Sullivan, 
Coleen Tuffy, Dawn Twomey, 
Paula Vecchiola, Rosemary 
Wahlberg, Margaret Weinbecker. 

Behind the scenes personnel 
included: 

Rehearsal accompanist and 
organist. Gay Sullivan: pianist, 
Jim Connors: percussionist. Bob 
Swanson; settings by. Galanis; 
costumes by, Baxter; special 
costumes by, Paula Kelly, 
assisted by Joan Ross. Celia 
Rogers, Patricia Belanger and 



Eileen Masse. 

Production assistant. Mary 
Stanley: stage manager. Tom 
Buckley, assisted by David 
Callahan, John Campbell. Bill 
Kennedy, Michael Ren/i. Steve 
Kelly, Mike Craig, Martin 
McNair and Joe Lynn; 

Projectionist, David 
M o n t e i r o : re h e a r s a 1 
refreshments. Connie Monteiro; 
wardrobe mistress, Mary 
Stanley, assisted by Cindy 
Antoon. Mary Gallinaro, Paula 
Kelly, Connie Monteiro. Joan 
Ross and Joan Peterson. 

Sound technician, Frank 
Veno: Spiritual Director. I'r. 
(i e r a I d J . O s t e r m a n : 
Administrative Chairman, Tom 
Buckley: Administrative 
Advisor, Mayor Walter J. 
Hannon: Secretary, Kay Flynn, 
assisted by Joan Ross. Trudy 
Buckley. 

Tickets, George Stanley; 
Publicity, Tom Connolly; 
.Refreshments. Rose Norton. 
Helen Connolly and the ladies of 
the parish; Program Book, Tom 
and Trudy Buckley, Rose 
Norton, Alice Callahan, Mary 
Bourke, Gay Sullivan, Mary 
DuRoss, Margaret Weinbecker 
and the Cast. 



Lionel Trains 

new & used 

NESCO TV 

423 Hancock St. 
Quincy 





mimiaiitrpujiti 



SOVTH SRQRI 

FACTORY SERVICE 



FOR 



RCA MOTOROLA SYLVANIA 

ZFNITH ADMIRAL WHIRLPOOL 

WESTLNGHOUSF. 
Call 479-1350 




The Quincy School Committee Has Scheduled A Public 
Hearing On Their Proposed Budget For The 18 Month 
Period January 1, 1973 To June 30, 1974. This Hearing 
Will Comply With Chapter 136 of Legislation Enacted In 
1972. The Date For Said Public Hearing Is Thursday, 
February 1, 1973 With The Meeting To Be Held In The 
School Committee Rooms, 70 Coddington Street, Quincy 
Commencing At 7:00 P .M. LawTence ^^^Z^ 



Page 12 Quincy Sun Thursday, February 1 , 1973 



DEATHS 



7 y 



Gerald McAlduff 59, of 99 
Montclair Ave., at the Jewish 
Memorial Hospital, Roxburv, 
Jan. 21. 

John P. Cooke, 60, of 33 
Hollis Ave., unexpectedly at his 
home, Jan. 21. 

Vincent W. McCabe, 54, of 
179 Arlington St., at the 
Veterans Administration 
Hospital, Jamaica Plain, Jan. 22. 

Karl A. Pike, 83, of 
Wollaston, at Cardinal Cashing 
Hospital, Brockton, Jan. 22. 

Donald L. Cutler, 48, of 83 
Greenwood St., Newton, 
formerly of Quincy, at Peter 
Bent Brigham Hospital, Jan. 23. 

Mrs. Adeline /Taiitillo/ 
Fusco, 74, of 168 Quincy St., at 
a local nursing home, Jan. 23. 

Mrs. Huena I MacLeod I 
Williams, 76, of 13 Garretson 
Rd, White Plains, N. Y., formerly 
of Quincy, in White Plains 
Hospital, Jan. 23. 

Carmello J. Saccone, 61, of 
21 James St.. at the Youville 
Hospital in Cambridge, Jan. 23. 

Elmer R. Fast man, 87, of 
Beechwood Manor, 7. 
Presidents lane, at his home 
Jan. 23. 

Mrs. Frances T. /Janacheski/ 
Benson, 68, of 18 Chapel St., 
Quincy, at Pacoima Memorial 
Lutheran Hospital, Tujunga, 
Calif. Jan. 23. 

Ralph T. Anzalone, 29, of 
145 WillardSt.,Jan.24. 

Louis Holzman. 82, of 100 
Reservoir Rd, at Quincy City 
Hospital, Jan. 24. 

Mrs. Helen B. /Mugford/ 
Wilson. 52. of 49 Wall St., at 
Quincy City Hospital, Jan. 24. 

* 

John A. Hedlund, 64, of 2 
Hedlund Ave.. Brain tree, 
formerly of Quincy. at Quincy 
City Hospital. Jan. 25. 

William M. Benjamin Sr., 54, 
of 67 Franklin Ave., at Peter 
Bent Brigham Hospital, Boston, 
Jan. 25. 



MEMORIAL GIFTS 



tVlRYlHING THAI IS 
WORTHWHILE & 
APPRECIATED BY 
YOUR CHURCH 



A. E. GOODHUE CO. 

vESTMINT MANUFACTURERS 
500 IN STOCK 

1 ]b3 HANCOCK ST 
OUINCY - 472 3090 



Mrs. Mildred /PhelanJ Clare, 
81, of 45 Lakeview Ave., 
Braintree, formerly of Quincy, 
in California, Jan. 25. 

Miss Marion Chalmers of 
Kennsington, P.F..L, formerly of 
Quincy, at PEL, Jan. 25. 

Edward W. Mattson, 61, of 
80 Stedman St., unexpectedly at 
his home, Jan. 25. 

Carmine Grazioso, 88, of 45 
Deldorf St., at Quincy City 
Hospital, Jan. 26. 

Mario DiTunno, 74. of 108 
Liberty St., at Quincy City 
Hospital, Jan. 26. 

Mrs. Jennie E. /Selander/ 
Lindquist, 79, of 43 Quincy 
Ave., at Quincv Citv Hospital, 
Jan. 26. 

Mrs. Barbara E. /Williams/ 
Nelson, 53, of 55 Robertson St.. 
at her home, Jan. 26. 

Mrs. Etta /Bevis/ Rebello, 
68, of Quincy, unexpectedly at a 
hospital in Hainesgille, Ga.. Jan. 
26. 



Mrs. Julia A. /Dcnnehyf 
Ginty, 87, of 211 Franklin St.. 
at a nursing home, Jan. 26. 



James J. Garrity. 90, of 811 
East Squantum St., at his home. 
Jan. 27. 



Mrs. Angelina M. /Darrigo/ 
Evangelist a. 54, of 504 A Sea St.. 
at Milton Hospital, Jan. 27. 



Bernard F. Starrs, of Miami, 
Fla., formerly of Quincy, in 
Miami, Jan. 27. 

Rudolf O. Oberg, 67, of 37 
Walker St., at his home, Jan. 28. 



Mrs. Sophia f Hillsonf Erluk. 
74, of 43 Old Colon} Ave., at 
the Presidential Nursing Home. 
Jan. 28. 



Timothy F. Buckley, 67, of 
248 Fenno St. , at Quincy City 
Hospital. Jan 28. 



I 



£ 



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# ROY'S FlOWEfcS 

t4 WASMNGTON ST 

owner 

472 -W 

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74 ELM STREET-QUINCY 



1 326 COPELAND STREET 
W. QUINCY 



OftfCTOft 

M. JOSEPH SWEfNEY 
TfUpkMt 77J-27M 



Morrisette Post Memorial Mass 
Feb, 19 To Honor Vietnam Veterans 



Commander Joseph Greene 
of Morrisette Legion Post invites 
the public to participate with 
members Feb. 19 in the 44th 
Annual Memorial Mass. 

This year the Mass is being 
expanded to honor returning 
Vietnam Veterans, Prisoners of 
War and those Missing In Action. 

Post Historian Roger DuFault 
is formulating plans for a parade 
and the Memorial Mass. The 
parade will form at the Post 
Home, 54 Miller St., West 



Quincy at 9 a.m. The Mass will 
be at St. Mary's Church, 
Crescent St. at 10 a.m., where 
Bishop Joseph F. Mcduire will 
deliver the sermon. 

This year the Mass will be a 
special one for Peace and 
Thanksgiving. 

The public is invited to help 
the Morrisette Post make these 
special ceremonies our way of 
telling these Vietnam veterans a 
fond "Well Done" and a sincere 
"Thank You", said Greene. "Let 



them know how proud we are of 
them and don't let them be the 
"Forgotten Veterans". 

"It is hoped each Veterans 
Post and Fraternal Organization 
will join with us on this day to 
honor our deceased veterans and 
to Thank God for the Peace our 
returning veterans so richly 
earned." 

This is our 44th Annual 
Parade and Memorial Service and 
will not be cancelled for any 
reason or weather condition. 



Trinity Lutheran Votes $26,520 



Members of Trinity Lutheran 
Church accepted a 1973 budget 
of $26,520 at their recent 
annual meeting. 

Officers elected at the session 
were William Tuori, 
vice-chairman; Harry Maki, 
secretary; Arthur Kaivisto, 
treasurer, and Mrs. Ronald 
Tastula, financial secretary. 

Mrs. Arthur Kaivisto and 
Robert Heikkila were elected to 
the council. 

Committee members include: 

Church Property - Toiv Tuori, 
chairman; Donald Robinson, 
Theodore Maki, Weikko Luoma 
and Hugo Luoto. 

Fvangelism - Arthur Ahola. 
chairman; Mrs. Edmund Vaino, 
Miss Fiina Nicmi, Mrs. Jean 
Leinonen and Mrs Richard 



Harries. 

Sovial Ministry - Dr. Fnsio 
Ronka, chairman; Mr. and Mrs. 
Robert Collins, Mr. and Mrs. 
Hugo Luoto, Mrs. Hugh Rose, 
Mrs. Albert Bonomi, Mr. and 
Mrs. Arthur Kaivisto, Mr. and 
Mrs. Harry Maki. 

Worship and Music - Miss 
Helen Heikkila, Mrs. Fdna 
Nicoll, Weikko Luoma, William 
Tuori, Mrs. Harry Maki, Miss 
Ruth Hirvimaki, Dominic 
Ferrisi, Christie Peters 

Christian Fducation - 
Edmund Vaino, chairman; Helen 
Heikkila, Harry Maki, social 
teachers. 

Stewardship - Fdward 
MacDonald and Thomas 
Whitworth, co-chairmen; Mrs. 
Ronald Tastula, Weikko Luoma, 



Ronald lastula, Robert Heikkila 
and Mrs. Donald Robinson. 

Finance - Sulo Soini, Ralph 
Ferrisi, Fdward MacDonald, 
Arthur Kaivisto. 

Head Usher - Weikko Luoma. 

Memorial Fund - Mrs. John 
Hedlund, chairman; Mrs. Arthur 
Kaivisto, Miss Lillian Kohonen. 

Auditors - Miss Ruth 
Hirvimaki and Mrs. Fdward 
MacDonald 

Publicity - Mrs. Weikko 
Luoma. 

Finnish Reporter - Miss Fiina 
Niemi. 

Youth Ministry Advisor - 
Norman Rose. 

Nominating Committee - 
Arthur Ahola, Weikko Luoma, 
Mrs. Hugh Rose, Dr. Fnsio 
Ronka. 



U-Mass Dean To Speak At 
United Nations Couneil Meeting 



"The Environment is 
International" will be the 
subject of Walter G. Rosen, 
Dean of College II, University of 
Massachusetts, Boston, when he 
speaks to the members of the 
United Nations Council of the 

South Shore, Feb. 8 at 7:30 
p.m. in the Parish Hall of the 
Church of the Presidents. 
Quincy Square. 

The meeting is also sponsored 
Kv the Leagues of Women 



Voters of the area. 

Dean Rosen, a newcomer to 
Boston, was at New York 
University, Buffalo, where he 
taught a course on "Technology 
in the Biosphere". He is a plant 
physiologist who became 
interested in the environment 
through his work which led him 
to realize the grim possibilities 
of biological warfare. Among 
other topics he will discuss the 
U.N. conference in Stockholm, 
what it did and did not 



accomplish. There will be a 
question period after his talk. 

Admission to the meeting is 
free, but reservations are needed 
for the supper which precedes it 
at 6:30 and for which there is a 

charge. For supper reservations 
call Miss Lena Foster, 12 Francis 
Ave., Quincy or Mrs. Meservey, 
43 Park St., Wollaston, before 
Feb. 5. Some places at the meal 
are reserved for students at a 
reduced rate. 



Three Quincy Women Receive Catholic Awards 



Three Quincy women were 
honored Sunday for work with 
Camp Fire Girls and Girl Scouts 
at a Day of Recollection al 
Boston College High School. 

They are Mrs. Louis Cogliano 



of 113 Philips St., and Mrs. 
Francis I'lynn of 79 Freeman 
St., both of Wollaston, and Mrs. 
Margaret Williams, Girl Scout 
Leader from St. John's Church, 
Quincy. 



St. Anne's Medals were 
presented to the threesome by 
the Rev. Msgr. Robert W. 

McNeill, the director of CYO for 
the Boston archdiocese. 



Trailside Museum Gets Thousands Of Trees 



The Blue Hills Trailside 
Museaum has been inundated 
with Christmas trees for 
recycling, officials report. 

The Museum, operated by the 
Boston Zoological Society, 
invited people to deposit their 
Christmas trees for use as deer 
shelters and wood chips. 
Thousands responded. 



The trees have been stacked 
on almost every available place 
around the museum grounds. 
Robert Stanhope, Director of 
the Trailside Museum, said "the 
response was much more than 
expected. He said the trees will 
all be recycled and put to good 
use around the museum. 

In addition to recycling 



Christmas trees, the facility is 
cooperating with eight other 
museums in "Museum Goers 
Month". Any time during 

January, the public may visit 
one museum and receive a free 
ticket good for admission to any 
of the other museums during 
week day afternoons. 



Brian Davenport Aboard Carrier Enterprise 



Navy Fireman Brian F. 
Davenport, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
George F. Davenport of 432 
Granite St., Quincy, is in the 
Western Pacific aboard the 



nuclear-powered aircraft carrier 
USS Enterprise. 

Recently the Big "E" made 
her first visit in four years to 



Hong Kong, where her crew 
spent seven days relaxing, 
shopping and enjoying the many 
exotic sites of this Crown 
Colony. 



Navy Seaman Recruit Paul G. 
Chambers, son of Mr. and Mrs. 



Paul Chambers Navy Recruit Grad 



Charles E. Chambers of 98 
Billings St., North Quincy, has 




Quincy Memorial 

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South Shore Chamber 
Seeks 300 New Members 



Thursday, February 1 , 1973 Quincy Sun Page 13 



"Become one of us. ..for all of 
us" is the theme of the 1973 
membership campaign of the 
South Shore Chamber of 
Commerce, announces George 
D . Rear d o n, Chamber 
Vice-President and General 
Chairman of the 1973 
membership campaign. 

The most concentrated 
membership drive in the 75-year 
history of the Chamber is 
underway Organizational 
membership drive committees 
have been firmed up in all 14 
communities served by the 
Chamber. Reardon said the goal 
is to secure 300 new members 
for the Chamber. 

Economic and Community 



Development, Industrial 
Development, Tourist and 
Convention Promotion, and 
Legislative Affairs are a few of 
the areas in which the South 
Shore Chamber of Commerce is 
committed. 

Representatives of the 
Chamber will be speaking before 
service clubs and community 
groups in the area to outline the 
Chamber's goals of the future 
for the benefit of the South 
Shore. 

Reardon said the total 
population in the 1 4 
communities served by the 
Chamber is 342,439 according 
to the U.S. and State Census of 
I 970. The population is 
expected to top the 382,000 
mark in 1975. 



QJC Offering New Course 
'Special Health Issues 
In Law Enforcement 9 



Quincy Junior College 
announces that it is offering a 
new course, Social Health Issues 
in Law Enforcement, for the 
Spring semester. 

The course was requested by 
and designed for law 
enforcement officials in the 
South Shore area. Purposes are 
to develop a broad and basic- 
understanding of the social 
problems that our youth are 
facing today and to develop 
sounder techniques to these 
problems. 

The course will cover five 
major areas. The first few 
sessions will focus on the 
psycho-social aspects of drug 
involvement. The second area 
will deal with the pharmacology 
of drugs and include discussions 
on the problems related to 
alcohol and alcoholism. The 
third area will include a review 
of current practices in the 



rehabilitation of juvenile 
delinquents, alcoholics and drug 
users. A fourth area will consider 
the state and federal laws 
pertaining to drug involvement. 
This phase will include guest 
speakers directly connected with 
the arrest, incarceration, 
defense, rehabilitation and/or 
imprisonment of the offender. 
The final area will focus on the 
drug education programs of 
schools at the national, state, 
and local levels. 

In addition to consideration 
of the above five areas, the 
course will include structured 
group experiences in 
va I ues -clarification, 
communication skills and 
problem solving activities. 

Further information may be 
obtained by contacting the 
Quincy Junior College office, 34 
Coddington St., Quincy Center. 



Two Quincy Men See Bob Hope 

F. Maguire Jr., son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Thomas F, Maguire of 54 
Williams St., North Quincy and 



Two Quincy men were among 
crew members of the USS 
Midway entertained by Bob 
Hope and his Christmas Show 
troupe in Singapore. 

The two are: 

Seaman Apprentice Thomas 



Seaman Apprentice Robert R. 
Dobson, son of Mrs. Edith 
Dobson of 7 Shennen St., 
Houghs Neck. 



Airman Gerald P. Densmore 
Assigned To Keesler AFB 



Airman Gerald P. Densmore, 
son of Mrs. Sophie M. Patts of 
Elton Rd, Milton, and Paul F. 
Densmore of Phipps St., Quincy, 
has been assigned to Keesler 

AFB, Miss., after completing Air 
Force basic training. 

During his six weeks at the 
Air Training Command's 

HI III ■ ■ I 1 



Lackland AFB, Tex., he studied 
the Air Force mission, 
organization and customs and 
received special instruction in 
human relations. 

The airman has been assigned 
to the Technical Training Center 
at Keesler for specialized 
training in communications-elec- 
tronics systems. 




The Doorway To Protection 

For The Professional 
Concept In Insurance 

1 357 Hancock Street, Quincy 472-3000 















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INSTALLED PRESIDENT of Granite Lodge, Local 1451, International Association of Machinists and 
Aerospace Workers AFL-CIO was Joseph A. Brodeur, second left. With him are Carmine Salines, business 
agent District Lodge No. 38; Ashley Osborne, vice-president and Charles Towers, sentinel. 

[Quincy Sun Photo] 

Granite Lodge I.A.M. & A.W Installs 



Joseph A. Brodeur, Jr. was 
recently installed president of 
Granite Lodge, Local 1 45 1, 
International Association of 
Machinists and Aerospace 
Workers A FL-CIO. 

The ceremonies were held at 
the Montclair Men's Club, North 
Quincy, with Frank Fvery, 
business manager District No. 38 
I.A.M. & A.W. the installing 
officer. 

Other officers installed were: 
Ashley Osborne, 



vice-president; Richard Post, 
recording secretary; George 
Abernathy, financial secretary; 
George Perrow, treasurer. 

Also, Ralph Badger, 
conductor; Charles Towers, 
sentinel; Raymond Lagerquist, 
Angelo Capone and James 
Warren, trustees. 

Guests attending included: 
Joseph A. Sullivan, president 
Massachusetts State Labor 
Council; Senate Counsel James 
R. Mclntyre; Lawrence Sullivan, 
executive secretary Greater 



Boston Labor Council; Charles 
Johnston, executive 
vice-president Norfolk Labor 
Council; Carmine Salines, Ralph 
Lindquist. Anthony Mastandrea 
and Thomas Cheney, business 

representatives District Lodge 
No. 3 8, I- d ward Murray, 
president District No. 38; John 
Miller, executive secretary 

District No. 38 and John 
Prendeigast, secretary-treasurer 
Local 264. 



A.S. Library Sponsoring Adult Education Classes 



The Adams Shore Library is 
sponsoring a series of adult 
education classes beginning the 
week of March 5. 

The classes to be held 
evenings for six weeks in the 
Adams Shore Branch are: 

Monday evening - Knitting 
and Crocheting; teacher, Helen 
Whiteman; fee $15; limit, 10 
persons. 

Tuesday evening - 
Introductory Photography; 



teacher. Ron Goodman: fee, 
$20: minimum, 8 persons. 

Wednesday evenings - Yeast 
baking, gourmet cooking; 
teachers, Anneli Johnson. Mrs. 
Tauno Rapo: fee, $20; limit. 10 
persons. 

Thursday evening - Oil 
painting; teacher. Marilyn 
LeBlanc; fee, $20: limit, 10-15 
persons. 

Registration will be held in 



the Adams Shore Library from 9 
a.m. to 9 p.m., Feb. 13 - IS. 
Classes will be filled on a first 
come basis. A registration fee of 
$5 will be required at this time 
with the balance of the course 
fee due the first night of the 
class. 

More information may be 
obtained by calling the Adams 
Shore Branch at 471-2400. ext. 
50. 



NEWSBOYS WANTED 

Here's a chance to earn extra 

money by building a Quincy 

Sua home delivery route. 

Telephone: 471 3100 



BRUSH MILL 
TRANSPORTATION CO. 



CHARTER TOURS 

All Arrangements Mode by Us 

For information coll 436-4100 

L. A. Anzuoni, Pres 



Put compound interest 
to work for you! 




Q<f effective yield* 
O two year thrift 
certificates 



'// dividends are left to accumulate tor one year. 



Norfolk's new thrift certificates offer you 
higher effective yields plus these outstanding features: 

• Guaranteed interest rate for term of deposit 

• Dividends paid annually or quarterly whichever you choose 

• Interest compounded every day 

• $500 Minimum balance 

• For your additional protection Norfolk offers capital funds in excess of 
$25,000,000. 

We also have five other ways to save, so you can choose one that's exactly 
right for you. Ask about them at any of our 32 convenient offices. 

Norfolk County Trust Company 

Member FDIC 



«*■■ 



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Mr 



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V 



Page 14 Quincy Sun Thursday, February 1 , 1973 
j MONEY TALKS 



How to Become Wealthy— 6 

"Ability to Make 
Decisions Is the Key" 



By Phil* J 
Pr«sJd«tt 
COLONIAL FEDERAL SAVINGS 
And Loan Association 
of Quincy and Holbrook 

• 6 WMfcd«yt a-7ia0 Thurtday* 




The development of per- 
sonal character is not just 
worthwhile for its own sake 
—whether for self-respect or 
to please God. It is essential 
if one is to become a better 
and more successful person. 

This is the consensus of 
successful men and women 
who have related their experi- 
ence and counsel in self-im- 
provement books. 

Nowhere is the character ot 
an individual more evident 
than in the way he reacts to 
critical situations that con- 
front him in his lifetime. 

Most people have little 
comprehension of decision- 
making as a key capacity of 
persons in positions of leader- 
ship. In their own lives they 
are accustomed to let others 
make decisions for them. 

But think of the demands 
upon character in the great 
decisions in American history. 
We dismiss casually today the 
fact of the Declaration of 
Independence and the 2eal 
which prompted it. But the 
56 signers, as Christopher 
S*u.\ Note* points out, "had 
a burning desire to secure the 
Ciod-given freedoms of gen- 
erations yet unborn; conse- 
quently they willingly en- 
dured amazing hardships." 

The night before the Dec- 
laration was adopted, the 
Christopher pamphlet notes, 
John Adams of Massachusetts 



wrote his wife: 

"I am well aware of the 
toil and blood and treasure it 
will cost us to maintain this 
Declaration." 

William Ellery of Rhode- 
Island made it a point to 
watch his fellow signers affix 
their names to the document. 
"I was determined," he said, 
"to see how they all looked 
as they signed what might 
well be their death warrants." 

Many later suffered impris- 
onment, burning of homes, 
loss of wealth and property, 
and ostracism from friends 
anil relatives. 

Think of the demands up 
on character for Abraham 
Lincoln in signing the Eman- 
cipation Proclamation, Robert 
E, Lee in leaving the Union 
Army, Harry S. Truman in 
using the atom bomb, John F. 
Kennedy in imposing the 
blockade on tuba. 

Decision making is almost 
always difficult and the easier 
course may be to postpone it. 
But oftentimes a postponed 
decision means a missed op- 
portunity — the tide in the af- 
fairs of men that, as Shake- 
speare said, leads on to for- 
tune if taken at the flood. 

The courage to make deci- 
sions is a primary factor in 
the directions our lives take. 
If we let decisions be made 
for us. we drift with the tide. 
II we steer our own course, 
we determine our future. 



John Burman Navy Recruit Grad 



Navy Airman Recruit John A. 
Burman, son of Mrs. George F. 
Smith of 23 Milton Road, North 
Quincv, graduated from recruit 



• FLAGS * 

INDO0R-C0MPl£TEJJ.\£-0UT0OOR 
ACCESSORI ES 

I flags HAPtToo'wTlin 

STATE RAGS-CHURCH f'lAGS 
FLAGS OF AIL NATIONS 

EAGLE FLAG CO. Inc. 

147 Moth St., 472-8242 
Wollo»ton, Most. 02 1 70 



training % at the Naval Training 
Center at San Diego. 

A former student of North 
Quincy High, he is scheduled to 
report to Aviation Electrician's 
Mate "A" School, Jacksonville, 
Fla. 



WOtlASTON 



l|N( *l I'K IWiU 



Now thru Feb. 6 



CHARLE 
BRONSON 

in A MICHAEL WINNER-Film 

"THE 
MECHANIC 



9:05 also 




SI. 00 admission 
al all performances 



Kiddies Matinees 
Sat. & Sun. 1:30 

ROBINSON CRUSOE JR. 

PLUS CARTOONS 

ALL SEATS 50if 



SOUTH SHORE 
SEWING MACHINE CO. 

1 1 Beak St, WoUaston 

471-5982 

We service All Makes Sewing 

Machines and Vacuum Cleaners 



• 



WOLLASTON 




SAMPLING GRAPES at North Quincy Knights of Columbus annual Italian Night at Quincy Armory are 
Alfred DelCupolo, chairman; Sal Re, committee member; Grand Knight Frank Dorney and Ken Runge, 
co-chairman. 

[Quincy Sun Photo] 

10,000 Raviolie$, 1,500 Meatballs For N. Q. 



Some 10,000 raviolis, 1,500 
meatballs, 150 heads of lettuce, 
300 loaves of bread, and 37 
pounds of cookies will be 
consumed by the 2,700 students 
of North Quincy High School 

and Atlantic Junior High School 
today (Thursday), as the 
schools hold "Italian Day". 

Walter Hedberg 
Aboard DE 

Navy Petty Officer First Class 
Walter M. Hedberg, husband of 
the former Miss Lorraine A. 
Campbell of 15 Felton St., 
North Quincy, has returned to 
his homeport at Newport, R.I., 
after a deployment in the 
Western Pacific aboard the 
destroyer escort USS Joseph 
Hewes. 



The special Italian luncheon 
will be prepared by cafeteria 
personnel under the guidance of 
chefs from the American Home 
Foods Company. 

George Cole, Director of 
Cafeteria Food Services, for the 
school system is working with 
the outside chefs to help prepare 
the meals and post materials 



which reflect 
heritage. 



the Italian 



Mr. Cole vievrs the Italian 
Day as a means of impressing 
upon students the origins of 
foods and is hopeful of holding 
similar days during which foods 
representative of other ethnic 
groups would be prepared. 



NEWSBOYS WANTED 
Here's a chance (o earn extra 

money by t uBdinj a Quincy 

Sua home d Rtfr ir y route. 

Telephone: 471 3100 




WOLLASTON 
CREDIT UNION 

PERSONAL A AUTO LOANS 

NO NOTICE SAVINGS ACCTS. 

IMN5%%NRANNUM 



SPECIAL L *L P« 
NOTICE Q 70 *-" 



RIAL ISTATt-MORTGAGIS 

HOMI UAMtOVlMINTS 

ALL ACCOUNTS F ULLY INSURED 

UNDER LAW BY MASS. C.U. 

SHARE INSURANCE COR*. 

651 HANCOCK ST., WOLLASTON 
773-3500 773-8600 

OKN MON.-THUKS. 9-1 TUIS., Wl 0., Ft 1. 9-3 



Protection that never sleeps 




KRRY INSURANCE AGBNCY. INC. 
671 HANCOCK STREET 
QUINCY, 02170 . TCL, 479-S50D 

Moii. - Fri. 9 - 5 Sal. 9 • 1 

Insurance for 
AUTO, HOME, BUSINESS 



• • • 



DON'T MOVE 
IMPROVE 

EVERYONE LOVES A PORCH.'.' 



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for ERH ESTIMATE AT NO OBLIGATION, PHONE 479- 1014 



Thinking Of Aluminum 
or Vinyl Siding? 

3 GOOD REASONS 

WHY YOU SHOULD CALL THE 

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1. Wo ere a loco! tltm with on •sfortl'shed reputation 'o mointein. 
2- No tc'ttmen employed - tfrui you tove talesmen's comm, jtion. 
3. Sd'ng «tvo 'ed by Iroined <ter iolists. 

DON'T IC HIGH FRESSURE0 INTO SIGNING A CONTRACT TO 
RFSIDE YOUR HOME CAU US FOR A FRfE ESTIMATE 



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For Reliability Dei>eiid.ibilih & Sen ire 

CALL NOW 479-1014 



Thursday, February 1 , 1973 Quincy Sun Page 15 



at Thomat Cran* Public Library 

Between 
the Covers 




Miss Carmen Ungar, artist, art 
teacher, and librarian of our Art 
Department, has prepared this 
week's list which is a selection 
from the hundreds of fine art 
books available at the Main 
Library. 

A HISTORY OF AMERICAN 
ART, by Daniel M. 
Mendelowitz. [Holt. $17,951 
This is a large volume of over 
700 works, 37 of which are 
reproduced in full color. It 
begins with the art of the 
American Indian and concludes 
with modem times. 

Throughout the book, the 
author's method has been to 
seek the general qualities of the 
times, places and esthetics that 
characterized them, by 
examining the works of artists 
who influenced their own and 
succeeding generations. It 
includes painting, sculpture, 
architecture and furnishings. 
This book is on the suggested 
reading list for a course of 
lectures at the Museum of Fine 
Arts. 

ROCK ART OF THE 
AMERICAN INDIAN, by 
Campbell Grant. |Crowell. 
$12,951 This book has 16 pages 
of color reproductions and 150 
black-and-white photographs 
and drawings. The text identifies 
motifs and their probable 
meanings, correlates them with 
regional and tribal cultures and 
migrations, and locates the 
major sites of rock art. 

FRANCIS BACON, by John 
Russell |N.Y. Graphic Society. 
$16,501 The author had many 
conversations with the artist 
extending over several years. He 
examines the artist's family and 
early life and lets the artist speak 
for himself in order to dispel the 
image of "Bacon" as a painter of 
nighlmares. 

SARGENT WATER- 
COLORS, by Donelson F. 
Hoopes. [Watson-Guptill. 
$17.50] Many critics feel 
Sargent's watercolors were his 
greatest achievement. This work 
has 32 full color reproductions. 

BEN SHAHN, edited by John 
D. Morse. [Praeger, $13,501 
This is a biography of the artist, 
compiled from interviews, 
.lectures, and articles by and 
about Shahn. Many illustrations 
are included. 



ABSTRACT PAINTING: 50 
Years of Accomplishment, from 
KandinsKy to the Present. Text 
by Michel Seuphor. (Abrams. 
$201 In this there are 530 
reproductions of which 382 are 
in full color. It is so well 
illustrated that it could serve as a 
directory of abstract painting. 

JAPANESE WOODBLOCK 
PRINTS IN MINIATURE; the 
Genre of Surimono. ITuttle. 
$ I 2.50| This beautifully 
illustrated book by Kurt 
Meissner contains 33 color plates 
and is a collector's item. A 
surimono is a small, relatively 
little-known woodblock print of 
the Tokugawa era. They were 
produced in smaller numbers 
and better quality than the 
ukiyo-e prints as we know them 
today. The great majority were 
designed and given in celebration 
of the New Year. 

DISCOVERING OIL 
PAINTING, by George 
Cherepov. I Watson-Guptill. 
$11,951 This text is detailed 
with s t e p - b y - s t e p 
demonstrations and many fine 
illustrations. 

PAINTING SEASCAPES, by 
John Raynes. | Watson-Guptill. 
$10,951 This informative book 
is quite different from others on 
how to paint the sea. The artist 
calls this the "Creative 
Approach". The first chapter 
describes all the gear and 
equipment needed including 
cases, carrying frames and 
clothing. 

THE ARTIST'S HANDBOOK 
OF MATERIAL AND 
TECHNIQUES, by Ralph Mayer. 
[Viking Press. $12,501 This 
1970 revised and expanded 
edition is so popular it hasn't 
been on the shelf since it was 
bought and the waiting list is 
still long! If you still have youi 
Christmas money, this would be 
a good investment. 

CREATING AND PAINTING 
IN WATERCOLOR, by Carl 
Nickel. [Doubleday. $7.95 1 The 
artist-author stresses a simplified 
way of learning and the 
development of the student's 
own creativity. There are over 
100 demonstrations and over 
200 strip-sequence illustrations. 



fr at>3 on 6 Cf JKichardion 

INSURANCE AGENCY 
INC. 



'Be Sure Now-Not Sorry Latei 

Robert W. Richardson 

PResident 3 1276 



Opposite Quincy 
Center MBTA 



CHEVROLET 

Sales and Service 
for over 50 years 

New and Used Cars 




CHEVROLET 



Duggan Bros. 

North Quincy Garage 

133 Hancock St. 

T«l. J2l-f400 





SPECIAL OLYMPICS for the mentally retarded are discussed by James Morrissey [center), program 
director for Massachusetts, with Quincy Jaycees President Charles J. Leonard [right] and Edward 
MacWhinnie, internal vice president. 

[Quincy Sun Photo] 

Local Bowlers Can Help Strike Out Muscular 

Bowlers who patronize their Chairman, announces that 
favorite Massachusetts Bowling arrangements have been made 
Lstablishment during the month for a promotion tilled, "Strike 

Out Muscular Dystrophy," 

which will be presented in 



care services and 



of February will have a chance 
to match the score of various 



sports and television 
personalities. 

Boston Bruin's Ken Hodge, 
Muscular Dystrophy 
Associations of America State 



cooperation with the 
Massachusetts Bowling 
Association. All proceeds from 
the project will benefit the 
health agency's programs of 



patient 
research. 

Bowlers who wish to 
participate may register then- 
three string total along with a 
50-cenl contribution at most of 
the slate's bowling 
establishments. The contest is 
divided into three categories 
with savings bonds offered as 
prizes to the bowlers who enter, 

I 



CAR WASHING 
IS OUR BUSINESS 



TRY OUR CUSTOM 

EXTERIOR 

CAR WASH 

Automatic 

White Wall 

Machine, 

Drying By 

Machine And 

Man Power 



Cold Weather 
is Approaching 

To avoid "freeze ups" be sure 
your car is completely dried 
WE thoroughly dry your car 
first bv machine 
and then manpower. 



.' i hi 



We Guarantee 
The Finest 

Wash 
Available 



We know we give the best custom exterior 

Car Wash available 

and it's only 



Read why our car wash is so 
superior. 

We don't have ALL the 
gimmicks that you have to buy 
to get a good CAR WASH! It's 
our business to give the best 
there is. Try us once! Wc* 
guarantee the best car wash 
there is. We dry our cars with 
manpower and clean your 
whitewalls with our automatic- 
wheel washer. 



Econo Car W 



459 Southern Artery 



Station 



^■i^« 



-* .» « * ■ ■ ii i in iwwi ijU—*fclW*Wfr« * 



Page 16Quincy Sun Thursday, February 1, 1973 



r * 



r> 



Frank Damigella President 
Quincy, S.S. Realtors Board 



The Quincy and South Shore 
Board of Realtors recently held 
their 35th annual installation 
banquet with Frank Damigella 
of Weymouth recently named, 
"Realtor of the Year" assuming 
his duties as President. 

Also installed were: Virginia 
Crismond, of Quincy, 
vice-president; Stedman C. 
Beckwith of Quincy, secretary 
and A. Virginia Delaney of 
Braintree, treasurer. 

The officers were installed by 
Richard 11. Hallett, President of 
the Massachusetts Association of 
Real Fstate Boards. Joseph R. A. 
Padiscio Sr., toastmaster, board 
past president and immediate 
past president of Massachusetts 
Association Real Fstate Boards, 
presented a gift and past 
presidents service plaque to 
Dorothy Fdgerly, outgoing 
president. 

Damigella told the audience 
that, "realtor participation in 
the community is most 
important and that total 
involvement is the key toward 
progress for a better 
community.'" 

He said that "education is a 
very important part of a realtors 
life with more courses and 
literature now available to better 
inform themselves first and then 
the public." 

The banquet was attended by 
officials of the state and local 
realtors boards and by Senator 
Arthur H. Tobin (D-Quincy| 
who installed the following 




NEW PRESIDENT - Frank R. Damigella, Weymouth Realtor receives 
gavel as new President of the Quincy and South Shore Board of 
Realtors from out-going president, Dorothy Edgerly. 



members of the board of 
directors: 

Howard F.. Back, Frank 
Bee her, Bernard Ciampi, J. 
Joseph Doran, Dorothy Fdgerly, 
Edward P. Flavin, Frederick K. 
Hopkins, Alfred V. McCaw, 
(ierald ('. Melanson, F. Lester 
Morill, Flouise A. Troup and 
Samuel M. Tuttle. 

Keynote speaker at the 
banquet was Senator Allan K. 
McKinnon |D-Wey mouth |, who 
told the group they should be 
concerned with legislative bills 
and measures which tighten the 
qualifications for becoming a 
real estate broker. 



Also honored were past 
presidents Dorothy L. Osborn, 
John J. dallagher Jr., Helena M. 
Perrone, Gordon F. Paige, Alley 
F. McGinnis Sr., Frederick R. 
Hopkins, Flouise A. Troupe and 
Joseph R. A. Padiscio Sr. 

Otner officials in attendance 
were William F. Connors, 
Director of Regional Office of 
the Veterans Administration, 
Peter Georges a director of 
National Association of Real 
Fstate Board and also Regional 
Vice-President of South Shore 
District of Massachusetts 
Association of Real Estate 
Boards. 





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includes proper insurance' 



|CAR STOLEN or DAMAGED 

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Check with your insurance agent 
for Theft or Lose of Use Coverage. 

Our rates may allow you to Rent a car 
at Special Low Rates. 



You get a clean car with every rental 1 

Econo Car Rental 

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H R S 8 5 M \ S \ r 
1 SUND> 



i 



479-4098 



Business News 

Hancock Bank To Merge 
With N. E. Merchants 



The stockholders of Hancock 
Bank voted Jan. 17, 
overwhelmingly to accept the 
plan of acquisition of the New 
Kngland Merchants Company 
which would acquire all the 
outstanding shares of Hancock 
Bank, according to William E. 
Kelley, president. 

The plan is still subject to the 
approval of state and Federal 
regulatory agencies. 

The New England Merchants 
Company plan of acquisition 
would provide for the exchange 
of 1.6 shares of New England 
Merchants Company common 
stock for each share of Hancock 
Bank stock, Kelley said. 

New England Merchants 
Company presently owns New 
England Merchants National 
Bank and is negotiating the 
acquisition of Barnstable 



National Bank along with 
Hancock Bank. 

Kelley said that Hancock 
Bank will continue to operate its 
14 offices throughout Norfolk 
County under the name of 
Hancock Bank with the same 
employees, officers and 
directors. 

He assured the same 
progressive financial philosophy 
and individualized customer 
service to which management 
attributes the outstanding 
growth of the bank in the last 
five years. 

Hancock Bank has assets in 
excess of $80 million and earned 
$3.20 per share last year. The 
Hancock Bank was formed as a 
result of a merger of the Quincy 
Trust Company and the Dedham 
Trust Company on January 1, 
1968. 



Shipbuilders Cooperative Bank 
Reports Assets Up; Elects Officers 



At the 53rd annual meeting 
of the Shipbuilders Cooperative 
Bank held recently, Directors 
Allan F. MacDonald, Edward F. 
Percy and Francis X. McCauley 
were re-elected-for a three year 
term. 

McCauley, who is also 
President-treasurer, reported 
that the total assets of the bank 
had reached $9,500,000, savings 
deposits increased over 
$500,000 and mortgage loans 
increased over $1 million. 



Officers re-elected include: 
President and Treasurer, 
Francis X. McCauley; Vice 
President, Kenneth P. Fallon Jr.; 
Vice President, John F. Cronin; 
Assistant Treasurer, Marion F. 
Osborne; Assistant Treasurer, 
Marjorie M. Wardrop; Security 
Committee Anthony D. 
Losordo; Allan F. MacDonald; 
Francis X. McCauley; Samuel M. 
Tuttle. Finance Committee 
Alexander Smith; John W. 
Kapples Jr., Edward F. Percy 
and Clerk Board of Directors, 
Francis X. McCauley. 



State Street Bank Names 
Robert Mahoney Asst. Treas. 



State Street Bankj.nd Trust 
Company, Boston, 
wholly-owned subsidiary of 
State Street Boston Financial 
Corporation, announces the 
promotion of Robert T. 
Mahoney to assistant treasurer, 
SSB Realty Trust. 

Mahoney lives at 70 Sherman 
St., Quincy with his wife, 
Nancy. 

Mahoney is a graduate of 



Milton High School and Boston 
College, class of 1972. He served 
in the U.S. Army for three years. 
In December, 1969 Mahoney 
joined the bank as graphics 

analyst. He subsequently served 
as market research analyst, then 
transferred to SSB Realty Trust. 
Active in his community, he 
serves as secretary of the Quincy 
Taxpayers Association. 



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Thursday, February I, 1973 Quincy Sun Page 17 



Presidents Game In Loss 

Raiders Fight Odds In Tourney Quest 



North Quiney's basketball 
team, fighting big odds in trying 
to gain another state tourney 
berth, is two games closer 
following last week's two wins 
and Tuesday hosted Somerville 
in an extremely vital game. 

Friday the Raiders are home 
to Maiden and Tuesday will play 
at Quincy. 

Going into Tuesday's 
Somerville game, North had to 
win six of its seven remaining 
games to qualify for the 
tourney. Despite the odds, 
Coach Bob Nolan is confident 
his team can do it. 

Last Friday North cut the 
odds by edging Everett, 73-71, 
for its second win of the week. 

Meanwhile, Quincy, hit hard 
this year by injuries and illness, 
succumbed to undefeated 
(Ireater Boston League leader 
Medford, 83-68, at Boston 
Garden in a preliminary to the 



Celtics game. 

Marty Finnegan's Presidents, 
refusing to quit despite the 
many boys out of action, 
Tuesday played at Revere, 
Friday plays at Chelsea and 
hosts North Quincy next 
Tuesday. 

North's co-captains, Jamie 
Doherty and Ken Marsters, 
combined for 54 points to spark 
the win over Fverett. Doherty 
had his best night with 33 
points, while Marslers scored 21. 

"The scoring of our captains 
and our entire defensive unit 
which switched between the 
diamond plus to a man-to-nian . 
alignment, were the reasons for 
the win," Nolan said. "As I said 
before, don't count us out, we'll 
still make the tournament." 

Quincy, much smaller than 
Med ford's powerhouse, fell 
behind, 26-11, in the opening 



period and Medford never 
looked back. The Presidents had 
a fruitful last period as they 
outscored the Mustangs, 27-14. 

Quincy had high hopes at the 
start of the season before leg 
injuries sidelined the three top 
rebounders. Two. Mike Marvelle 
and Jim McKinnon, are back but 
are slow in getting back into 
shape, while 6-5 Bill Kiggen is 
still out. 

"Give our kids plenty of 
credit, they could easily have 
quit when the three players were 
on crutches, but they keep 
plugging all the time and I'm 
very proud of them." linnegan 
said. 

John Reggiannini exploded 
tor 31 points, while Ken Furfari 
and reserve Mike Kelly were 
outstanding. 

Farlier in the week North got 
away to a big first half lead and 



had no trouble topping Chelsea. 
78-5 (>. 

The Raiders had an 1 8-4 first 
period lead and widened it to 
40-2 I at the half. 

« 

Bob Morton had his best 
offensive game ever as he scored 
l l > points and excelled on the 
boards. Doherty had 22 points 
and Marsters added 12. 

The North junior varsity 
romped, 54-15. as Kim Clifford 
paced the attack with 15 points. 

Quincy played one o\' its 
better games as it topped Maiden 
for the second time. 4'M4. 
thanks to a good night from the 
foul line and a fine defensive 
performance. 

Quincy hit on 21 of 2(> free 
throws while Maiden had. 10 for 
13. Marvelle, coining along 



slowly alter recovering from a 
broken ankie and missing most 
of the season, sank two clutch 
foul shots in the last seconds to 
insure the win. 

linnegan hailed the play of 
Furfari and Reggiannini. and 
also had good words for Mark 
'MacLeod, Marvelle and 
McKinnon. the latter' returning 
to full-time action after a knee 
injury. 

Reggiannini and Furfari had 

10 points each. MacLeod had 

nine and McKinnon and Phil 
lovanna had eight apiece. 



The Presidents' jayvees 
bree/ed. 57-20, ;rs Pres Carroll 
and Mark Dwyer had 10 points 
each. They improved t licit 
record to 7-3. 



Eye All-League Meet Win 



North Trackmen Take GBL Co-Title 



By TOM SULLIVAN 

North Quiney's winter track 
team, finishing its best season 
ever, breezed past undermanned 
Quincy, 64-22, last week to 
wind up as co-champion of the 
Greater Boston League. 

Bob Gentry's Raiders posted 
a 5-1 record to tie Revere, which 
edged Somerville, 46-40, last 
week to boast the same record. 

"It was a fine season but we 
now want to win the all-league 
meet [Saturday at the Medford 
Cage] and prove we are number 
one," said a pleased Gentry. 

For Tom Hall. Quincy coach, 
it was the end of a frustrating 
season. The Presidents started 
well but the flu and injuries 
ruined their chances and they 
finished with a 2-4 mark. 

"We had 12 of our boys 
missing against North including 



three of our best, Marty Swirko 
and Mark MacLeod, both 
undefeated, and Ray Lawyer, 
beaten only once," Hall said. "I 
don't want to take anything 
away from North, because they 
had a terrific team and I don't 
think we could have won even at 
full strength, but we certainly 
would have scored a lot more 
points." 

Hall explained that North 
came within a hair of becoming 
sole league champ as Revere and 
Somerville nearly tied. A matter 
of inches kept Somerville from 
gaining a tie. 

At the start of the season 
Gentry predicted he would have 
the best relay team in the league 
and he was right. The Raiders 
finished undefeated in this event 
as Lee Watkins, Bob 
McCormack. Jack Pomerole and 



Jack Reynolds won against 
Quincy. "I used juniors in the 
relay last year and felt sure they 
would be the best this \ ear." the 
veteran coach said. 

North won all but two events 
last week and swept three. 

Steve Fran so so, Mark 
Mulvaney and Burt Bray were 
1-2-3 in the shot put as Bray 
suffered his first defeat. 

Dick Malloy. Joe Psota and 
Gary Cunniff swept the 1000 
and Reynolds. Fransoso and 
George Hennesey swept the. 
hurdles. 

McCormack won the mile and 
Bob Crowell was third, Mark 
Canavan won the 600, Pomerole 
won the 300 and Paul Doherty 
took third. Watkins won the 
dash and Dave Ashmanskas was 
third. 



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Canavan and Reynolds tied 
for second in the high jump, and 
Art Barrett was thud m the 
two-nnle. 

(Quiney's only winners were 
Steve Player in the two-mile and 
John Johnson in the high jump. 
Actually he and the two North 
jumpers had the same height bill 
Johnson was declared the winner 
because of fewer misses. 

Steve Nolan was second in 
the mile. Steve Oriola second in 
the 300. Dave Diliona second 
and Amie Yorrosso third in the 
600. Tim Kane third in the 
two-mile and Johnson third in 
the dash. 

"The most heartening aspect 
of the meet was that Johnson 



was the only senior who 
scored." Hall said. "We had a 
tine group ttt sophoinous and 
i uniors. Our kids did a n 
excellent job against tough odds 
with sii many missing from our 
last few meets and everyone put 
out 100 percent. Now we just 
have to look toward the spring 
and hope we stay health)"." 

DelORIO. LYNCH PACE 

M IDC IT H'S 

Car\ Delorio and Paul Lynch 

did the goal-scoring at the 
Oninc\ Midget "H" team tied 
.•\hington, :-:. Jan. :<» in an 
Alamo Hockey League game , 

Next. Ouincy meets Scituate 
Saturday 1 1 oh. gj at ( >:45 a.m. 
on Rink Cat Hingham Arena. 



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Page 18 Quincy Sun thurjday, Februaiy 1 , 1973 

Junior High Spotlight 

Atlantic-North Runs 

Basketball Win 

Streak To Seven 



Atlantic-North's ninth grade 
basketball team continues to 
make shambles of the Junior 
High School League with three 
victories in the past two weeks 
to run its winning streak to 
seven games without a defeat. 

With high-scoring Warren 
Jordan topping the 
basket-makers in each contest, 
Atlantic-North toppled Central, 
34-31, trounced Point, 55-30, 
and bombed Broad Meadows, 
46-16. 

Jordan had 1 2 points against 
Central, 16 points against Point, 
and 15 points against Broad 
Meadows. 

Other high scorers for 
Atlantic-North were Richard 
Mahoney, 10 against Central; 
Mike Kelly 15 and Jay Nelson 
10 against Point; and Bob 
Coughlin and Ed Mahoney, eight 
each against Broad Meadows. 

High scorers for the losers in 
each contest were Jack Browne 
14 and Jack Hatfield 10 for 
Central; Dwight Anderson six 
for Point; and Kevin Donovan 
seven and Jack Colletti four for 
Broad Meadows. 

Central came the closest of 
any team to interrupting 
Atlantic-North's string by- 
outscoring them 17-11 in the 
last period only to lose by three. 
In other ninth grade games: 
Point defeated Sterling, 
37-29. 

Central easily got by Broad 
Meadows, 33-20, with Paul 
Kelleher getting 12 points and 
Jack Hatfield 11. 

Central also had little trouble 
in disposing of Sterling, 51-23, 
as Ed Mahoney and Jack 
Hatfield each had 10 points and 
Jack Browne seven. Anthony 
Cedrone scored seven for 
Sterling and Eric Carrea and 
Ricky McCarthy four each. 

Broad Meadows took Sterling 
into camp, 28-17, as Kevin 
Donovan poured in 10 points 
and Paul Southerland six. 
Anthony Cedrone had nine for 



Sterling and Eric Carrea had 
four. 

Central kept pace behind 
Atlantic-North with a close 
34-29 victory over Central 
despite an 18-point performance 
by Joe Carloni for the losers. 
Scott Roberts had nine and Jack 
Hatfield eight for Central. 
In eighth grade contests: 
Atlantic-North 33, Central 

13. Keith Lindburgh, eight 
points for the winners. 

Sterling 21, Point 18. 

Atlantic-North 41, Point 22. 
Keith Lindburgh, 12 points as 
Atlantic-North won its sixth in a 
row. 

Broad Meadows 32, Central 
18. Jack Uhlar got 16 for the 
winners. 

Central 17, Sterling 13. 
Sterling held Central scoreless in 
the fourth quarter but couldn't 
overcome an eight-point deficit. 

Atlantic-North 21, Broad 
Meadows 14. Walter McGinley, 
10 points. 

Broad Meadows 30, Sterling 

14. Jack Uhlar matched Sterling 
output with 14 points. 

Central 22, Point 16. Ed 
Daley, 10 points for Point. 

In seventh grade action: 

Central 10, Atlantic-North 9. 
William Phelan, six points for 
undefeated Central. 

Sterling 23, Point 15. 

Atlantic-North 9, Point 6. 
Tom McElaney, four points as 
Atlantic-North evened its record 
at three wins, three losses. 

Central 16, Broad Meadows 
2. Jack Ross got the only two 
points for the losers. 

Sterling 19, Central 7. Tied 
6-6 at the half, Sterling held 
Central to one point in the 
second half in breaking Central's 
undefeated streak. 

Atlantic-North 8, Broad 
Meadows 4. 

Sterling 17, Broad Meadows 
7. JohnSylva, 13 points. 

Central 13, Point 9. James 
Finnegan and John Timmons 
four points each as Central 
began a new win string. 



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Keohane's, Shannonaires Rack 
Up Pee Wee House Victories 



Tom Landry and John 
Canavan chipped in two goals 
apiece Jan. 23 as Keohane's 
downed the Wollaston Theater, 
5-2, in Quincy Youth Hockey 
Pee Wee House League play at 
Hingham Arena. , 

Bill Foley got the fifth goal 
for Keohane's with assists going 
to Chris Kenny and Ricky 
Ahola; two each, and Johnny 
Mullin. 

John Keany and Mike Pitts 
were the scorers for the 



Wollaston Theater, assisted by 
Jimmy Witham and Johnny 
Marsters. 

Shannonaires edged 
Morrisette Post, 2-1, on goals by 
Ed Marella and Bob Newcomb, 

assisted by Mike Marella. Bob 
Lindgelzer got the Morrisette 
goal. 

In a non-league game Jan. 21 
Wollaston Theater whipped 
South Weymouth Savings Bank, 
4-1. 



Mike Pitts, Mark O'Brien, 
Johnny Marsters and Tom Lacey 
got the goals and John Keany, 
Jay DeLuca, Tommy Brennan 
and Mark O'Brien the assists. 

Next Tuesday's [Feb. 6] slate 
at Hingham Arena pits 
Shannonaires against the United 
Commercial Travelers, 6 p.m., 
Rink A; Keohane's against 
Morrisette, 6:15 p.m., Rink C; 
and Wollaston Theater against 
Crestview Nursing Home, 7:30 
p.m., Rink C. 



Quincy Pee Wee A's Take 
Pair In Bay Colony Loop 



The Quincy Pee Wee "A" 
team, riding along in first place 
in the Bay Colony Hockey 
League, won a pair of victories 
last week, beating second place 
Brockton, 4-2, and Hingham, 
6-4. 

Brian Jolly got a couple of 
goals in the important Brockton 
win, with two assists going to 
Brian Bertoni and one to John 
Norton. 

Squirt B's 
Tie Duxbury 

Mike Doherty and Fred 
Palmer got the goals for Quincy 
as the Squirt "B" team tied 
Duxbury, 2-2, Saturday in an 
Alamo Hockey League game at 
Hingham Arena. 

Bobby Beniers, Mark Boussy 
and Paul McConville got the 
assists. 

In a non-league game, Quincy 
tied the Randolph "A" team 
2-2. 

The Squirts play Rockland 
next Saturday [Feb. 3] at 2:15 
p.m. on Rink C. 

CHIOCHIO SCORES FOR 
MITE B'S 

Mike Chiochio took a pass 
from Jimmy Seymour and 
scored the only Quincy goal as 
the Mite "B" team bowed to 
Duxbury, 5-1, Saturday [Jan. 
27) in an Alamo Hockey League 
game at Hingham Arena. 

Quincy meets Cohasset next 
Saturday [Feb. 3) at 12:15 p.m. 
on Rink B. 



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Ed Kane, assisted by Mark 
Giordani and Dave Lewis, aided 
by Jim Triglia, got the other 
Quincy goals. 

Bertoni fired two goals and 
assisted on another by John 
Norton in the victory over 
Hingham. 

Kane and Bobby Hayes each 
scored goals and assisted each 
other, while the Lewis-Triglia 
combination clicked once again 



for a Lewis goal. 

The Quincy Pee Wee "A" 
team has been beaten only twice 
and tied once in 31 games to 
lead its division with 56 points, 
nine better than runnerup 
Brockton. 

Quincy meets South Boston 
Sunday [Feb. 4] at 1 p.m. on 
Hingham Arena's Rink C, and 
plays Scituate Wednesday [Feb. 
7] at 9:30 p.m., also on Rink C. 



Dave Previte In Hat Trick 
As Bantam B's Drub Scituate 



Dave Previte rifled in his first 
three-goal hat trick Saturday to 
lead the Quincy Bantam "B" 
team to a 7-1 victory over 
Scituate. 

Rick Carnali, Matt Dillon, 
Dave Perdios and Mark Kelly 
had the other Quincy goals in 
the Alamo Hockey League 
contest. 



In non-league games, Jerry 
Croni got the goal that gave the 
Bantams a 1-1 tie with Holliston 
Friday and Dennis Bertoni and 
Richie Troy scored during a 7-2 
loss to Brookline Thursday. 

The Bantam "B" meets 
Abington next Saturday [Feb. 
3] at 9:30 a.m. on Rink A, 
Hingham Arena. 



Nardone, Dee Dee's Winners 
In Squirt House Action 



Nardone Aluminum 
continued its winning ways in 
the Quincy Youth Hockey 
Squirt House League Jan. 26 
with a 3-0 victory over Hannon 
Tire on two goals by Mark 
Andrews and a single by Dickie 
Reinhardt. 

Dee Dee's got goals from Joe 
McKenna, Johnny Toland, Kevin 
Ryan and Tom Doherty in 



beating North Quincy 
Professional Building, 4-1. Karl 
Nord got the only goal for the 
losers. 

Next Friday's action at 
Hingham Arena finds Nardone 
facing off against NQPB at 6:15 
p.m. on Rink C; and Dee Dee's 
playing Hannon at 7:30 p.m., 
also on Rink C. 



Quincy Bantam A's Split 

The Quincy Bantam "A" The Bantams play Columbia 

team split a pair of Bay Colony tonight [Thursday] at 8:45 p.m. 

Hockey League games, beating on Hingham Arena's Rink C, and 

Hingham, 5-2, and losing to South Boston Saturday [Feb. 3] 

Brockton, 5-1 . at 4: 1 5 p.m. on Rink A. 



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In Quincy Youth Hockey Action 



Thursday, February 1 , 1973 Quincy Sun Page 19 



Bersani Tops On Coffey's Third Shutout 



Bersani Brothers goalie 
Jimmy Coffey blanked the 
Quincy Sun, Saturday, 5-0, for 
his third shutout of the season 
to move his team into sole 
possession of first place in the 
Quincy Youth Hockey Bantam 
House League. 

Paul Andrews, Mike Marks, 
Jerry Smith, John Fornasaro and 
Dana Chjavaroli scored the goals 
for Bersani. 

Derringer's reached up from 
the bottom of the league to gain 
a 4-4 tie with Farina Kitchens, 
dropping Farina into second 
place, only a single point behind 
Bersanis. 

Paul Barry had two goals and 
Mark Ricciardi and Jackie 
Cavanaugh one each for 
Derringer's while John 
Fitzgerald had two goals, his 
sixth and seventh of the season, 
and Kevin Doyle and Tom 
Wilkinson had one apiece for 
Farina. 

Blackwood Pharmacy moved 
to within a point of second place 
with a 5-1 win over Johnson 
Motor Parts. 

Dennis Rush scored twice for 
Blackwood while Bob Carmody, 
Eddie DiRamio and Rick Dannar 
had single goals. Billy Morrison 
tallied for Johnson. 

Blackwood meets Bersani in a 
crucial game next Saturday at 



Bantam 


Top Scorers 




Goals 


Assists Pts. 


John Fitzgerald 


. 7 


6 13 


Farina 






Bob Carmody, 


3 


8 11 


Blackwood 






Tom Wilkinson 


6 


5 11 


Farina 






Paul Andrews, 


6 


4 10 


Bersani 






Jerry Smith, 


5 


4 9 


Bersani 






Paul Barry, 


5 


2 7 


Derringer's 






Rick Dannar, 


6 


1 7 


Blackwood 






Dave Peters. 


4 


3 7 


Farina 






Mike Marks. 


1 


6 7 


Bersani 






Bob Crews, 


1 


6 7 


Farina 






Richie Boyle, 


5 


2 7 


Quincy Sun 






Tom Ward, 




5 7 


Johnson's 







7:15 a.m. on Rink C, Hingham 
Arena. Derringer's plays 
Johnson, 7 a.m., Rink A, and 
the Quincy Sun meets Farina, 
8: 15 a.m., on Rink A. 



Bantam House Standings 



Won Lost Tied Pts. 



Bersani Brothers 


5 


2 





10 


Farina Kitchens 


4 


3 


1 


9 


Blackwood Pharmacy 


4 


3 





8 


Quincy Sun 


2 


4 


1 


5 


Johnson Motor Parts 


■> 


4 


1 


5 


Derringer's 


1 


| 


3 


5 



Mike McNiece Scores 4 As 
Quincy Mite A's Bomb Avon 



Mike McNiece slammed in 
four goals and Kevin Craig added 
a pair as the Quincy Mite "A" 
team bombed Avon 10-1 
Sunday, Jan. 28, and remain in 
contention in the Bay Colony 
Hockey League. 

Johnny Cummings, Kevin 
Duff, Paul McCabe and Mark 



Tenny got the other goals. 

Assists were credited to Kevin 
Craig |4|, Richie Stevens [31, 
Paul McCabe [21 and Kevin 
Chase, Tommy Murphy, Kevin 
Duff and Mark Tenny, one each. 

Next Sunday at Hingham 
Arena, Quincy plays Hanover at 
12:15 p.m. on Rink B. 



The Quincy Midget "A" team 
easily swept a pair of Bay 
Colony Hockey League games 



MIDGET A'S SWEEP PAIR 

by trouncing Bridgewater, 7-2, 
Jan. 22 and walloping Holbrook, 
11-0, Jan, 27. 




C. A. COX RAMBLER of the Quincy Youth Hockey Midget House League lines up [left to right] front 
rovy, John Gallagher and Rich Duccheri. Second row, Steve Neville, Sean Morgan, Brian Connelly and 
Joe Megnia. Back row, Coach Gerry McGrath, Mike Doherty, Ken Drain, Mike Hornbrook, Rich Lucier, 
Vin Durkin, Larry Ready, Bob Megnia, Kevin Pitt and John Attola. 

[Quincy Sun Photo] 

Neville Scores 4 Goals To Pace 
Cox To Midget House Wins 



Steve Neville added four goals 
to Ins growing total as Cox 
Rambler ran its Quincy Youth 
Hockey Midget House League 
undefeated string to six games 
with victories over the Fire 
Department Local. 5-3, and 
Tiffany Realty, 3-2. 

Neville collected a pair of 
goals in each contest. 

Also scoring against the Fire 
Department Local [Jan. 231 
were Larry Ready, Vin Durkin 



and Bob Megnia. with Mike 
Hornbrook collecting three 
assists. Rick Lucier two. and 
Bob Megnia, Kevin Pitts ;ind 
John DiRico one each. 

Local goals went to Charlie 
Ri/vo, Charlie McLean and Bill 
Connolly assisted by Bill 
Williams, Bill Pitts and John 
Mitchell. 

Neville also had two against 
Tiffany with Brian Connolly 
getting the third score. Assists 



went to Rick I ucier. Bob 
Megnia. Kenny Drain and Sean 
Morgan. 

Mark I ra/ier and Waller 
Punental got the Tiffany goals. 

Rich's South Shore I x press 
plays Cox Rambler Saturday 
I I oh. 3| at 8:30 a.m. on 
Hingham Arena's Rink (', and 
the J- ire Department Local 
meets Tiffany Tuesday | Feb. <>| 
at K:3() p.m. on Rink A. 



Robbie Craig's Hat Trick Leads Squirt A's 



Robbie Craig got the 
three-goal hat trick Sunday as 
the Quincy Squirt "A" team 
demolished Hull, l >-3, to retain 
its six-point lead atop the Bay 
Colony Hockey League 
standings. 

John Furey and Tommy 
C»erry had two goals each and 



George Mackey and Tommy 
Mullen had one apiece. 

Nine players chalked up 
assists, with Scott Richardson 
getting three, Mark Messina two. 
and Robbie Craig. John Furey. 
George Mackey, Mark Veasey. 
Paul McGrath, Robbie Zanardelli 
and Chuckle Marshall one each. 

The Squirts also tied 



Weymouth, 2-2. in a non-league 
encounter on goals by John 
Furey and Mark Messina, with 
assists to Robbie Craig and Neil 
Shea. 

Quincy meets Abinglon in its 
league game Sunday | Feb. 4| at 
8:30 a.m. on Hingham Arena's 
RinkC. 



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Page 20 Quincy Sun Thursday, February 1 , 1973 

Girls Basketball 



First Ladies, Raideretters In Fast Start 



Girls' basketball has 
progressed rapidly at Quincy and 
North Quincy High schools since 
being inaugurated a few years 
ago. 

Quincy introduced the sport 
to the girls during the 1968-69 
season when Mary Lou I hnnas 
now coach at Marshfield, led the 
First Ladies to a 3-2 record. 

dale Palmer took over as 
coach the following year and has 
had fine success. The Quincy 
girls have reached their peak this 
year and going into this week's 
games had an 8-0 record and led 
the Greater Boston League in 
which they finished second a 
year ago. 

North Quincy started girls' 
basketball in the 1 969-70 season 
with Margie Bollen as coach. 
Although not boasting the same 
success as the Quincy lasses, the 
Raiderettes have done well. 

Barbara Webster took over as 
coach a year ago, and following 
a fourth place finish in the GBL, 
has her girls rolling along with a 
6-2 record, including a 5-2 
league mark going into this 
week's games. 

Friday afternoon Quincy 
plays at Chelsea and Maiden is at 
North Quincy. Tuesday Quincy 

ojo ooooo u a uuau oooooeo 



and North play for the second 
time at the Quincy gym. 

"We have our entire squad 
back this season and the girls 
have been playing excellent 
ball," Miss Palmer said. "The 
only game in which we had any 
trouble was at Med ford and the 
extreme heat in the Medford 
gym, I know, hampered us 
considerably as we nearly lost a 
big lead." 

The veteran varsity squad 
includes Seniors Debbie 
Congdon, Cathy llacqua, Jean 
Macchi, Debbie jjpillane and 
Betsy Witt, all three-year 
players, and Juniors Kathy 
Bennett, Donna Brickley and 
Susan Higgins, two-year players. 

"We could use a few more 
inches in height, but the girls' 
versatility and team work more 
than make up for this height 
disadvantage," Gale continued. 

The junior varsity squad, with 
a 3-3 record, has Seniors Kristin 
Poole and Vanessa Sylvia, 
Juniors Lori DeCoste and 
Sophomores Jean DeAngelo, 
Maureen Duggan, Patty Foley, 
Paula King, Valerie King, Andrea 
Leiblein, Kathy Loughran and 
Terry Tucker. 



lOBDOOooo n eooo e aooB 






** I 




Health 
High-Lights 

By Jack Silverstein 



> u ooopoooaBBaDaaoooo«Ba ii BBOi 



The Quincy girls ran their 
unbeaten streak to eight last 
week with two wins. They 
defeated Maiden, 49-29, and 
followed up with a 59-37 Win 
over Medford. 

In the Maiden game Quincy 
trailed, 21-19, at halftime but 
exploded in the last two periods 
to win with ease. 

Miss Congdon and Miss 
Bennett paced the First Ladies' 
attack, while Miss llacqua also 
stood out. 

Against Medford Miss 
Congdon scored 25 points, many 
of her points coming as a result 
of good passing on fast-break 
situations. Miss Brickley and 
Miss Macchni contributed nine 
points apiece. 

The North lasses also added 
two wins last week. They 
breezed past Chelsea, 33-13, and 
trampled Fverett, 60-34. 

Against Chelsea Debbie 
Mattson and Dianne Smith had 
out-standing games, while Leslie 
Runge and Donna Zenker shone 
against Fverett. Miss Runge and 
Denise Berejjniewitz have 
sparked the Raiderettes most- of 

the season. 

The North Junior varsity 
defeated Chelsea, 20-8, sparked 
by Susan Johnson and Helen 
Thompson, while it was edged 
by Fverett, 26-20, with Miss 
Johnson again standing out. 



ORTHODONTURE 
FOR ADULTS 



According to a prominent 
Atlanta orthodontist. Dr. Marvin 
Cioldslein, teeth that arc crooked. 
protruding or unduly separated 
can he improved, even when a 
person is fully grown. 

Dr. Goldstein says. "Protrusion 
and separation of the front teeth 
cause more unhappiness to more 
people than almost any other 
cosmetic problem. Many young 
women in their twenties, thirties 
and for HUB have had severe 
protrusion corrected and found 
new doors opened to them. The 
improvement culminated in more 
self confidence and happiness in 
every occasion and even a 
wedding or two. 

No adult is too old for 
orthodontic treatment, he says, as 
long as there is enough bone 



structure to support the teeth. 
Irregularities in bite and spacing 
encourage both decay and gum 
disease. 

One grandmother said this 
treatment was the most exciting 
tiling that has happened to her in 
many years and only regretted 
thai she had not had her 
protruding teeth corrected when 
she was a "young girl" of 50. 

* « * 
This information has been 
brought to you as a public service 
by NABOKHOOD PHARMACY, 
406 Hancock St., No. Quincy, 
where you can always count on 
friendly, professional service. 
Hospital equipment and supplies 
for rent or sale. Let us keep your 
prescription tax and insurance 
records. Phone: 773-6426. 



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Following wins over Maiden, 
49-30, Revere, 42-32; and 
Chelsea, 52-8, the First Ladies 
pulled away for a 59-38 win over 
North, giving them a 7-1 record 
over the Raiderettes in their 
intra-city rivalry. Quincy then 
nipped Medford, 34-32, after 
leading by 17 points, and last 
Friday ran away from Fverett, 
47-25. 

"We lost Betsy Witt in the 
first three minutes against North 
Quincy with a badly sprained 
ankle, but despite this loss, our 
girls won with little trouble," 
Miss Palmer pointed out. 

She explained that the 
scoring is evenly distributed 
among the squad and said the 
girls pass the ball well and are 
aggressive. 

"Cathy llacqua has the best 
foul shooting perc itage," Gale 
went on. "At the end of the 
season the player with the 
highest free throw percentage is 

awarded the Coaches Trophy. 
Cathy won it last year." 

Quincy's junior varsity came 



from behind to squeak by 
North, 20-18, to remain 
unbeaten in the series [7-0 for 
the First Ladies]. 

Miss Palmer sees Quincy, 
Revere, Medford and North as 
the top four in the league and 
pointed out that Revere, winner 
over Maiden, could again be the 
spoiler. 

The North Quincy girls' only 
other loss was to Revere, a 48-47 
heartbreaker after the 
Raiderettes had led most of the 
way. A foul shot with four 
seconds to go won the game. 

North defeated Chelsea, 
50-12; Maiden, 37-26; Thayer 
Academy, a non-league foe 
previously unbeaten, 45-41, and 
Medford, 41-32. 

The North jayvees, like 
Quincy, have a 3-3 -record for 
the season. 

"We ran into foul trouble 
early against Quincy and were in 
trouble the rest of the way," 
Miss Webster said. "Next time 
(Feb. 6 1 we promise to give 
Quincy its best game of the 
season." 



N.Q. Boosters Meet Feb. 7 



The North Quincy Boosters 
Club will meet Feb. 7 at 7:30 
p.m. in Room 117 at North 
Quincy High School. Parents and 

friends of North Quincy sports 



are welcome. 



NEWSiO YS WANTED 

Hett's a chance to earn extra 

Money by building a Quincy 

Sua home delivery route. 

Telephone: 471 3100 




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For Service or Product Information Call Pete or Remo 773-02031 



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In GBL Hockey 



Thursday, February 1 , 1973 Quincy Sun Page 2 1 



Quincy, North 
In Win Streaks 



Two weeks ago it appeared 
North Quincy's hockey team 
was going nowhere in the 
(Ireater Boston League but five 
straight unbeaten games [three 
wins and two ties| suddenly 
have thrown the Raiders into 
contention for a state tourney 
berth. 

Following their three straight 
wins the Raiders came from 
behind to tie third place 
Medford, 3-3, Monday night to 
run their record to 5-5-4. As ties 
are considered the same as wins 
in qualifying for the tourney, 
they now have an outside chance 
at making it. Prior to its three 
wins, North had tied Quincy. 

Friday the. Raiders play 
Somerville at 9 p.m. at Boston 
Arena and Monday, also at 9, 
they face powerful second place 
Maiden. 

Meanwhile, Quincy also had 
three straight wins and a tie 
going into Monday's games but 
Bob Sylvia's Presidents bowed to 
Maiden, 3-1. 

Friday Quincy faces 
league-leading Revere at 9:20 
p.m. and Monday meets 



Medford at the same time. 

Ron Krikson's surprising 
North team trailed, 3-1, with 
about three minutes to play 
Monday but Robbie Henderson 
converted Ken Graham's pass to 
score at 8:52 of the last period 
and Joe I, anna n scored a 
spectacular goal with 1:20 left 
to tie it. Lannan shot the puck 
into the top left corner while 
falling due to the desperation 
grab of a beaten Mustang 
defenseman. Mark Hurley and 
Ken Jago assisted on the play. 

North had scored at one 
minute of the finale on Hurley's 
goal, with Jago and Lannan 
assisting, to cut Medford's lead 
to 2-1. 

"These kids have been 
playing simply fantastic hockey 
of late and don't count us out of 
a tourney berth," said an 
enthused Hrikson. In their 
previous game North had 
shocked previously unbeaten 
Revere, 4-2. 

Quincy averted a shutout 
Monday when Al Lancione 
scored an unassisted goal with 
about a minute to play. 



Blue, Red Teams Wi 



in 



In St. Joseph's Hockey 



In St. Joseph's Hockey 
League action at Shea rink, the 
Blue Team dominated the Gold 
team, 6-3, and the Red team 
drubbed the last place Green 
team, 8-3. 

The Blue team outshofc the 
Gold team almost two to one. 
Scoring the hat trick for the 
Blue team was Paul Chella, while 
Dick Kelley scored two goals 
and Dave Frrichiello one. Butch 
Francesini scored two goals and 
John Alfano one to complete 
the scoring for the Gold. 



In a game which had all the 
makings of an upset |4 to 3 a I 
the halfway markl, the Red 
team was ab^e to storm back in 
the second half with four goals 
to completely outplay the Green 
team. 

Scoring for the Red team 
were Rick Brunstrum and Mike 
McNalley two goals apiece, 
James Crowley, Lloyd Allen, 
Ron Gattuma & Jim Steen each 
had one goal. 

Jerry McCormick, Bob 
Fanora and Jim Connors scored 
for the Green team. 



Chuck Condos Standout 



For Bowdoin 



The Bowdoin College varsity 
hockey team, which has finished 
at the top of the Lastem College 
Athletic Conference (LCAC1 
Division I! standings for the past 
'our years, is off to a fast start - 
undefeated so far this season. 



One of the Polar Bears' 
standout wings is Chuck Condos 
of Quincy, a veteran who scored 
five points | three goals and two 
assists | in the first three games. 

Condos received honorable 
mention on the season's first 
weekly All-Fast Division II team. 




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FOR 



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ZFNITH ADMIRAL-WHIRLPOOL 

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Function Inquiries 
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Enjoy Dining Ouc In 
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ENTERTAINMENT A DANCING 
Nejhtly • 

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Local 513 Sitting Atop 
Quincy Bowling Little Loop 



Rolling a high team three of 
1,342 pihs and a high team 
single of 490, Local 513, 
AFL-CIO continues to romp 
along at the top of the Quincy 
Little Loop Bowling with an I I 
game lead over the rest of the 
field. 

Dick Magnarelli, the captain 
of Local 513, tops the individual 
howlers with an average of 
100.27, slightly more than a full 
pin better than Frank Granara's 
99.24. 

The top ten: 

Dick Magnarelli, 100.27. 
Frank Granara, 99.24. 



Frank Miceli, 99.00. 
Pat Connolly, 97. 1 2. 
Vin Durkin, 95.26. 
Steve Martinelli, 95.80. 
Mike Regan, 94.18. 
Dan Finn, 93.40. 
Bruce Terry, 92.21. 
Tony Alcssi, 91.14. 
Nick Anaslas, 91.14. 

The standings: 

Local Mi, AFL-CIO, 44-12. 
Montclair Men's Club, 33-2. V 
George Burke Club, 33-23. 
Quincy F.Iks, 32-24. 
Hal Davis Club, 30-26. 
Hutchinson Oil Co., 30-26. 



Atlantic Fuel Oil Co., 28-28. 
Joseph l ; . Brett Club, 28-28. 
Bryan Post VFW, 28-28. 
Wollaston Bowladrome, 
27-29. • 

James R. Mclntyre Club 
22-34. 

Hennessey Plumbing, 21-35. 

Dick Morrissey Club, 21-35. 

Local 1451, AFL-CIO, I7-3V. 

High team three: Local 513 
1,342. 

High team singles: Local 513 
and Hennessey, 490. 

High individual three: Dick 
Magnarelli, 340. 

High individual single: Pal 
Connolly, 130. 



Sox- Ledger In Clemente 
Basketball Fund Game 



A basketball team comprising 
Red Sox and former Red Sox 
players known as the New 
Lngland Major League All-Stars, 
will play a team of employees 
from The Patriot Ledger in a 
charity basketball game Sunday 
night, Feb. 4, at 7, at North 
Quincy High School. 

Proceeds will go to the 
Roberto Clemente Memorial 
Fund aiding victims of the 
earthquake in Managua, 
Nicaragua. 

Tickets at $2 apiece may be 
purchased at The Patriot Ledger 



in Quincy and at various outlets 
throughout Quincy. 



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Page 22 Quincy Sun Thursday, February 1 , 1973 



Veterans 
News 



LEGAL NOTICES 



J 



u 



i» 



- My wife served in the 
Marine Corps during World War 
I. She passed away several years 
ago', but her illness and death 
had nothing to do with her 
military service. I hear there is 
some kind of new law allowing 
widowers like me to get a VA 
pension. Is this true? 

A - Yes. This is Public Law 
92-540. But there is an income 
limitation for the pension. 

Q - My husband was killed in 
the Army in Vietnam and I 
would like to enroll in a well 
known university in Paris, 
France. Will VA help me do 
this? 

A - Yes. If you are eligible for 
assistance under the Dependents' 
Educational Assistance Program, 
you may now attend approved 
foreign institutions of higher 
learning. 

Q - My brother is blind from 
a Vietnam war injury, lie's home 
now but we can't seem to get 
him interested in living again. 
Isn't VA doing anything about 
young men like him? 

A - VA recently entered into 
an agreement with the Blinded 
Veterans Association for B.V.A. 
representatives, t hemselves 
Mind, to augment VA services to 
blinded veterans. 

- My husband was totally 
disabled as the result of an 
accident while he was in the Air 
Force. With him and the 
children to look after, I can't 
leave home to go to school so 1 
can get a job. Can VA arrange 
for me to go to school at night 
or take a correspondence 
course? 

A - Yes. Women in your 
situation are eligible for 
education benefits under more 
liberal rules under the new 
education law. Please discuss this 
with the veterans assistance 
officer at the nearest VA 
regional office. 

Q - As a female veteran going 
to school full time under the Gl 
Bill, can I claim my husband as a 
dependent? 

A - Yes. Public Law l )2-540, 
signed by the President October 
24, 1 972, makes educational 
benefits and all other veteran 
benefits apply equally to male 
and female veterans. To take 
advantage of this benefit, you 
should apply to the nearest 
Veterans Administration 
regional office. 



COMMONWEALTH 01 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of MAURICE CASIIOOK late 
of Quincy in said County, deceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court praying that HYMAN 
C A SHOOK of Randolph in the 
County of Norfolk be appointed 
administrator of said estate without 
giving a surety on his bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dcdham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the twenty-first day of lebruary 
1973, the return day of this citation. 

Witness, J. JOHN I OX, Esquire, 
first Judge of said Court, this 
seventeenth day of January 1973. 

Paul C. Gay 
Register 
1/25 2/1-8/73 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of ANGF.LO BIANCIHNO late 
of Quincy in said County, deceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court, praying that LOUIS H. 
DiBONA of Milton in the County of 
Norfolk, or some other suitable 
person, be appointed administrator 
of said estate. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Quincy 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the fourteenth day of lebruary 
1973, the return day of this citation. 

Witness, J. JOHN EOX, Esquire, 
First Judge of said Court, this 
eleventh day of January 1973. 

Paul C. Gay, 
Register. 
1/18-25 2/1/73 

COMMONWEALTH 01 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of MARY McMENIMON late 
of Quincy in said County, deceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by 
CATHERINE F. REINHARDT of 
Brookline in the County of Norfolk 
praying that she be appointed 
executrix thereof without giving a 
surety on her bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dcdham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the seventh day of March 1973, the 
return day of this citation. 

Witness, J. JOHN I OX, Esquire, 
first Judge of said Court, this 
twenty-sixth day of January 1973. 

Paul C. Gay. 
Register. 
2/1-8-15/73 



Newsboys 

(And, Newsgirh, Too) 



WW 

I 



WANTED 




1601 Hancock St 

471-3100 



LEGAL NOTICES 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of LOUISE F. SEPPALA late 
of Quincy in said County, deceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a oertain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by ROBERT G. 
STIRLING of Quincy in the County 
of Norfolk praying that he be 
appointed executor thereof without 
giving a surety on his bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Brookline 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the twenty-eighth day of February 
1973, the return day of this citation. 

Witness, J. JOHN FOX, Esquire, 
first Judge of said Court, this 
twenty-second day of January 1973. 

Par' C Gay 
Register. 
2/1-8-15/73 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of JOSEPH BENNETT late of 
Quincy in said County, deceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will and one codicil of said deceased 
by BERNICE 1. BENNETT of 
Quincy in the County of Norfolk 
praying that she be appointed 
executrix thereof without giving a 
surety on her bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dcdham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the twenty-first day of February 
1973, the return day of this citation. 

Witness, J. JOHN I OX, Esquire, 
first Judge of said Court, this 
eighteenth day of January 1973. 

Paul C. Gay 
Register 
1/25 2/1-8/73 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of HELEN H. HARRIS late of 
Quincy in said County, deceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will and codicil of said deceased by 
JOHN A. SULLIVAN of-Weymouth 
in the County -of Norfolk praying 
that he be appointed executor 
thereof without giving a surety on his 
bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dcdham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the twenty-first day of February, 
1973, the return day of this citation. 

Witness, J. JOHN FOX, Esquire, 
First Judge of said Court, this 
seventeenth day of January 1973. 

Paul C. Gay 
Register 
1/25 2/1-8/73 

CITY OF QUINCY 
MASSACHUSETTS 

PURCHASING DEPT. 

1 1 20 HANCOCK ST. 

QUINCY, MASS. 02169 

LEGAL AD 

Invites sealed proposals for 
furnishing and delivering to the City 
of Quincy, School Dept - High 
School Diplomas. 

Detailed specifications are on file 
at the office of the Purchasing Agent. 

Bids must state priorities, if any, 
the delivery date and any allowable 
discounts. Firm price bids will be 
given first consideration and will be 
received at. .the office of the 
Purchasing Agent, 1 120 Hancock St., 
Quincy, Mass., until Feb. 12, 1973 at 
10:00 A.M. at which time and place 
they will be publicly opened and 
read. Proposals must be in a sealed 
envelope and on the outside marked: 
DATE: Feb. 12, 1973 TIME: 10:00 
A.M. Bid enclosed. 

The right is reserved to reject any 
or all bids or to accept any part of a 
bid or the one deemed best for the 
City. 

Richard K. Newcomb 
Purchasing Agent 
1/25 2/1/73 



LEGAL NOTICES 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of VINCENT DiGIACOMO 
also known as VINCENZO 
DiGIACOMO late of Quincy in said 
County, deceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by AN PHONY 
DiGIACOMO of Quincy in the 
County of Norfolk praying that he be 
appointed executor thereof without 
giving a surety on his bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dcdham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the twenty-first day of February 
1973, the return day of this citation. 

Witness, J. JOHN FOX, Esquire, 
First Judge of said Court, this 
nineteenth day of January 1973. 

Paul C. Gay 
Register 
1/25 2/1-8/73 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Notfolk, ss. Probate Court 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of ESTHER GABRIELLA 
JOHNSON late of Quincy in said 
County, deceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court by WHITFIELD W. 
JOHNSON of Watertown in the 
County of Middlesex, praying that 
the value of the property of said 
deceased remaining after the 
payment of debts and charges of 
administration may be determined by 
said Court. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the seventh day of February, 1973, 
the return day of this citation. 

Witness, J. JOHN FOX, Esquire, 
First Judge of said Court, this 
twenty-eighth day of December, 
1972. 

Bennett V. McLaughlin 
Register 
1/18-25 2/1/73 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of WILLIAM E. HOOKWAY 
late of Quincy in said County, 
deceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by MARY W. 
HOOKWAY of Quincy in the County 
of Norfolk praying that she be 
appointed executrix thereof without 
giving a surety on her bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the twenty-first day of February 
1973, the return day of this citation. 

Witness, J. JOHN FOX, Esquire, 
First Judge of said Court, this 
seventeenth day of January 1973. 

Paul C. Gay 
Register 
1/25 2/1-8/73 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

To IRENE G. JENSEN of Parts 
Unknown. 

A libel has been presented to said 
Court by your husband, WILLIAM F. 
JENSEN of Quincy in the County of 
Norfolk praying that a divorce from 
the bond of matrimony between 
himself and you be decreed for the 
cause of cruel and abusive treatment 
and praying for custody of minor 
children. 

If you desire to object thereto, 
you or your attorney should file a 
written appearance in said Court at 
Dedham within twenty-one days 
from the eighteenth day of April 
1973, the return day of this citation. 

Witness, J. JOHN FOX, Esquire. 
First Judge of said Court, this 
eighteenth day of January 1973. 

Paul C. Gay 
Register. 
1/25 2/1-8/73 



LEGAL NOTICES 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of RICHARD J. BARRY also 
known as RICHARD J. BARRY, JR., 
late of Quincy in said County, 
deceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by RICHARD 
W. BARRY of Quincy in the County 
of Norfolk praying that he be 
appointed executor thereof without 
giving a surety on his bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the twenty-first day of February 
1973, the return day of this citation. 

Witness, J. JOHN FOX, Esquire, 
First Judge of said Court, this 
sixteenth day of January 1973. 

Paul C. Gay 
Register 
1/25 2/1-8/73 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of HYMAN LJVITZ late of 
Quincy in said County, deceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court, for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by ESTHER 
LEVITZ of Quincy in the County of 
Norfolk praying that she be 
appointed executrix thereof without 
giving a surety on her bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the twenty-first day of February 
1973, the return day of this citation. 

Witness, J. JOHN FOX, Esquire, 
First Judge of said Court, this 
nineteenth day of January 1973. 

Paul C. Gay 
Register 
2/1-8-15/73 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

To ELIZABETH PHELAN of 
Quincy in the County of Norfolk, 
and to her heirs apparent or 
presumptive and to the Massachusetts 
Department of Mental Health. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court alleging that said 
ELIZABETH PHELAN has become 
incapacitated by reason of advanced 
age and physical incapacity, to 
properly care for her property and 
praying that JOSEPH E. BURKE of 
Quincy in said County, or some other 
suitable person, be appointed 
conservator of her property. 

If you desire to object thereto, 
you or your attorney should file a 
written appearance in said Court at 
Dedham before ten o'clock in the 
forenoon on the twenty-first day of 
Febniary 1973, the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness, J. JOHN FOX, Esquire, 
First Judge of said Court, this 
seventeenth day of January 1973. 

Paul C. Gay 
Register 
2/1-8-15/73 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of NICHOLAS C. KOURY late 
of Quincy in said County, deceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
said^ourt for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by AGNES A. 
KOURY of Quincy in the County of 
Norfolk praying that she or some 
other suitable person, be appointed 
administratrix with the will annexed 
of said estate. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Brookline 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the twenty-eighth day of February 
1973, the return day of this citation. 

Witness, J. JOHN FOX, Esquire, 
First Judge of said Court, this fourth 
day of January 1973. 

Paul C. Gay, 
Register. 
1/18-25 2/1/73 



T 




471 
3100 



GOCMSSi&i 



Thursday, February 1 , 197.* Quincy Sun Page 23 



'/Off THEACTtCN 
YOU WANT 1 



LEGAL NOTICES 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of BENJAMIN STERIN late of 
Quincy in said County, deceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by CECILE 
STONE of Quincy in the County of 
Norfolk praying that she be 
appointed executrix thereof without 
giving a surety on her bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the twenty -first day of February, 
1973, the return day of this citation. 

Witness, J. JOHN I OX, Esquire, 
First Judge of said Court, this 
seventeenth day of January 1973. 

Paul C. Gay 
Register 
1/25 2/1-8/73 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of CHARLES SHAW 
BATCHELDER, also known us 
CHARLES S. BATCHELDFR, late of 
Quincy in said County, deceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will and one codicil of said deceased 
by JEANNETTE LAMOND 
BATCHELDER of Quincy in the 
County of Norfolk praying that she 
be appointed executrix thereof 
without giving a surety on her bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the twenty-first day of February, 
1973, the return day of this citation. 

Witness, J. JOHN FOX, Esquire, 
First Judge of said Court, this 
fifteenth day of January, 1973. 

Paul C. Gay 
Register 
1/25 2/1-8/73 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of ELIZABETH C. HOLMES 
late of Quincy in said County, 
deceased. And to the Attorney 
General of the United States, Office 
of Alien Property, if necessary. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for license to sell at 
private sale certain real estate 
situated in said Quincy of said 
deceased, and that the petitioner may 
become the purchaser of said real 
estate, in accordance with the offer 
set forth in said petition. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham, 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
the seventh day of February, 1973, 
the return day of this citation. 

Witness, J. JOHN FOX, Esquire, 
First Judge of said Court, this 
twenty-eighth day of December 
1972. 

Bennett V. McLaughlin, 
Register. 
1/18-25 2/1/73 



MATTRESSES 



MATTRESSES -Immed 
Delivery • Can you use 
exceptionally good buys 
on king, queen, full or 
twin mattresses, beds, 
trundles, bunks at 
discount. Brand names, 
Sealy. Eclipse, 
Slumberland, Englander, 
etc.; Bedding still our only 
business for over 18 years., 
open eves.. Siesta Sleep 
Shops, 221 Parkingway, 
Quincy 

-F. 



i^^"-^» 



-•* 




MAIL TO: QUINCY SUN 1601 Hancock St., Quincy 02169 
WANT ADS PAYABLE IN ADVANCfe...cash mutt accompany order. 
Enclosed ii___.br the following ad to run times. 



OOTY: 



Rates: 
Contract rate: 



$2.25 for one week, up to 20 words, 5*5 each additional word. 
$2.00 per week, up to 20 words for three or more insertions of 
the same ad. 

No refund will be made at this contract rate in the event of 
cancellation. 

Deadline: Friday 5 P.M. for the following weeks publication. 

Please include your phone number in ad. 



HELP WANTED 



Typists/Inventory Control 

We Have An Immediate Opening In Our Boston Office For An 
Individual With Good Typing Skills. This challenging position 
offers a wide variety of duties, including receiving and inventory 
control. Attractive salary and fringe benefits. For interview 
contact Mr. Cropper 

Quincy Market Cold 
Storage And Warehouse Co. 

555 Pleasant St.. Watertown. 923-2100. 
An equal opportunity employer 

Principals only. 






LADIES 

Earn $20 to $40 an evening 
and wardrobe twice a year as 
a Beeline Fashion Stylist. No 
investment. For appointment 
call Mrs. Ellis, 293-7810. 2/1 



DO YOURSELF A FAVOR! 



BABY SITTER 
Baby sitter wanted for Vk 
year old, to baby sit on some 
weekends and weekday nights 
in South Quincy. Call 
472-9033 after 5 p.m. 2/1 



Join our Fashion Frocks 
Family! Our Styles sell on 
sight. Earn $20 to $60 a 
night. No collecting, 
delivering, investment. Call 
545-3950. 2/8 



APARTMENT FOR RENT 



FOR SALE 



1960 Lhurs Sport Cruiser. 
26', sleeps two, head, sink, 
ice box, 135HP Chrysler, All 
equipment in excellent 
condition, needs paint, 
$2,200. 479-7152. 2/8 



Hyde Park - 4-room heated, 
1st floor, available now. 
References. Call 361-8004 or 
327-4610. 1/25 



INSTRUCTION 



BOOK FOR SALE 



PEOPLE ARE FOR 
LOVING" by Dr. Wm. F. 
Knox; 48 pp [ illustrated ] 
on the beauty and 
conflict in marriage: 
based on his syndicated 
newspaper column. For 
your copy send $3 to: 
Knox Media, Inc., 320 
Washington St., Norwell 
02061. 2/1 



Mind Dynamics, Inc. Alpha 
Brainwave Training. 
Relaxation, E .S.P., 
Awareness. For class 
information call Mr. R. 
Waldron, 235-7877. 2/1 



GUITAR 



Guitar lessons in your home 
by professional Guitarist and 
Teacher. Call 773-3588. 2/8 




birth 

defects 

are forever. 



SERVICES 



SERVICES 



FLOORS & WALLS 

Linoleum, ceramic tie, formica, aokt 4 installed. Hardwood 
Boon laid, sanded and finished. Many specials in our store. 
Wall Tie, carpeting. Armstrong floor coverings of all types 
at reduced prices. 

ART FLOOR COMPANY 

1123 Blue Hills Avenue, Dorchester 

TA 5-6179 



Open 8:00 5:00 Daily 
Closed Sat 



wmmm 



ALTERATIONS 



HALLS FOR HIKE 



Alterations done in my home. 
Reasonable rates. Wollaston 
area. Call 479-2539. 2/1 



BOATS 



AIR CONDITIONED HALL 
FOR HIRE. No. Quincy K. of 
C. Building, 5 Hollis Ave. For 
information please call 
328-5158 328-0087 - 
328-9822. 



Clearance prices on all boats. 
Storage & reconditioning of 
motors for winter. President 
Marine, 666 Southern Artery, 
Quincy. 773-5058. t.f. 



INSURANCE 



CARPENTRY 





If you have 


a basic 


homeowners po 


licy 


for 


$20,000 and are paying 


(no re 


than $75.00 a 


year 


call 


282-4412 at once 


Rutstein 


Insurance Agency. 







Licensed builder, 26 years 
experience. Repairs, 
remodeling & additions. No 
job too small. Free estimates.. 
Charles J. Ross, 479-3755. 



KEYS MADE 



FUEL OIL 



DOYLE & LONG 

FUEL OIL 

& 

HEATING EQUIPMENT 

630 Hancock St., Wollaston 

Tel: 472-4800 



Locksmith on Duty 

GRANITE CITY 

HARDWARE 

1617 Hancock St., Quincy 

479-5454 



TAILORING 



OIL DELIVERY 

Nashe Oil Co. 
Fuel Oil 
472-5968 .2/8 \ 



AL'S TAILORING 


328-6915 


Alterations • Fittings - 


Repairs for L 


adies & 


Gentlemen. . Call 


between 


9:30 a.m. & 4 


30 p.m. 


Evenings 6:00 p.m 


to 7:00 


p.m. Also Zipper Service. 



TRAILERS 




fTWch of Dimes 



unless you help. 



THIS «P ACS CONTailUTtB SY THS PUBLISH** 



DAMON PONTIAC & 
TRAILER SALES 8. 
SERVICE. Chateau, Lifetime, 
Road-cruiser, Hobo, Camel 
Travel Trailers & Motor 
Homes. Sales & Svce. Route 
18-Bedford St., Abington. 
878-0682. 



-1 



* « 



w—m 



Page 24 Quincy Sun Thursday, February 1 , 1973 



MILTON HOME FURNISHERS 



NOTICE 



TO THE 



PUBLIC 



AFTER MANY YEARS 



oOT control, i« . 



iWffl 



WE ARE 

GOING 

OUT OF 

BUSINESS! 

WE MUST 

CLOSE OUR 

DOORS ON or 

BEFORE 
MARCH 5th 

All Sales Final 

• NeRoeroers- 
Ne Special Orders 
Inventory Mor cnoneiso Only 



esftSS. 



I; * 



€#\ 









ENTIRE 



stock OF FINE 



HOME 






> *9)g* 



»NINGS 



HOR« UMOS 



sh*g 



•sske 



iof* 



LIVING ROOM SUITES 



Modern, Contemporary, Colonial, | 
Sectional, Spanish, Provincial 

NOW AT 

BIG PRICE 

CUTS 

Over 300 Living Room 
Pieces To Choose From. 



JET 



°*00M 



SUITES 



»EggS*r 



CASH-lf You Have lt,CREDlT-lf You Want It! 



TABLES, LAMPS, 
ACCESSORIES, uf 

FANCY MIRRORS, TO 
PICTURES, ETC. 



PRICES 

INCLUDE 

SETUP 



DELIVERY 



THE WHOLE STORE IS 
ON SALE!!! 

Use Your 

Mastercharge-BankAmericard-Budget 



HURRY. ..DON'T DELAY!!! 



free Parking Available 



iAST MILTON SQUARE - 360 GRANITE AVE. 



to Fri. 0.9 Sert. tiR 5 



696-3420 



ihczas Crane Public Library 




Vol. 5 No. 21 

Thursday, February 8, 1973 



2(UKC4t'& Omt KtteiUf IftuufHifivi 




3- w»- 

o S 



p 

01 






Over 20 Candidates Already Warming Up ' 

8-Ward Plan To Trigger Biggest City Council Fi 



\D 




By PAUL HAROLD 



3 



RESCUE REWARDED - Eddie Laracy, 13; roeeives a plaque and a hew pair of skates worn Jim Trigtia 
of Johnson Motor Parte Co. in recognition of his rescue of a 6-year-old girl who had fallen through the 
ice on St. Moritz Pond. John Cooney, captain of Eddie's Quincy Youth Hockey Association team, and 
City Council President Arthur H. Tobin look on. The Cjty Council also awarded Eddie an off icial city 

commendation. 

[Quincy Sun Photo] 



'Guess What Eddie Did?' 



13-Year Old Hockey Player Honored 
For Rescuing Girl From Drowning 



It might have gone 
unnoticed if Lori Laracy, 1 1 , 
hadn't gone home and told 
her mother: 

"Guess what Eddie did?" 

What Eddie did was go 
into St. Moritz Pond near the 
Shea Skating Rink and pull 
out Nancy Ruta, 6, of 27 
South Junior Terrace, South 
Quincy, as she was about to 
drown. 

And that's why they 
honored 13-year-old Eddie 
Laracy, son of Police Sgt. and 
Mrs. Richard Laracy of Viden 
Rd, South Quincy, Monday 



night at a City Council 
meeting with a plaque, a new 
pair of skates, and an official 
commendation from the city. 

The plaque read: 

"To Eddie Laracy for your 
alert and outstanding effort 
in preventing a tragedy on 
Jan. 14, 1973, from Johnson 
Motor Parts Co." 

Eddie is a center on the 
Johnson Motor Parts team in 
the Quincy Youth Hockey 
Association's Bantam House 
League. 

The skates were to replace 
the pair that he ruined fishing 
the little girl out of the water. 



Eddie was skating with * 
friend on Jan. 14 and just sat 
down on the edge of the 
pond to rest When he heard 
Nancy fall through the ice 
and call out for help. 

Quickly, he skated the 30 
feet to where the girl had 
gone under. Only her arms 
were above the surface. He 
grabbed one of her hands and 
pulled her out and took her 
to shore. 

There, a man wrapped the 
little girl in a blanket and 
took her home and Eddie, 
thinking nothing of it, went 
on skating with his friend. 



LaRaia Seeks Vote On S. Quincy Station 



City Councillor Joseph J. 
LaRaia has urged the City 
Council to go on record 
immediately in opposition to the 
proposed MBTA station and 
parking facility in South Quincy. 

"Any further delays by the 



council," said LaRaia, "could be 
interpreted as a softening of the 
opposition to the South Quincy 
station by the City Council." 

The Council's Committee on 
Transportation has before it a 
resolution, submitted Jan. IS by 



LaRaia, which would place the 
council on record against the 
station. 

LaRaia said he will a* that 
the resolve be acted upon at the 
next meeting of the council. 



Ecumenical Open House At City Hall Feb. 19 



Plans are underway for an 
ecumenical day of thanksgiving 
for the end of the war .in 
Vietnam to be held on 
Washington's Birthday [Feb. 
191 in City Hall and, if the 



weather is right, spilling out into 
the Square. 

Tentative plans also call for a 
performance by the Quincy 
Symphony Orchestra and an art 
exhibit sponsored by the Quincy 



Art Association. 

The Rev. John Graham of 
historic First Parish Church is 
expected to be a Protestant 
representative in the ecumenical 
services. 



Quincy's new eight-ward 
bring out the biggest field 
city's recent history. 

Although the City Council 
will not take action on the new 
ward lines until Feb. 12, more 
than 20 potential candidates are 
already twirling their hats for a 
toss into the political ring. 

The historic proposed 
re-districting unveiled by City 
Clerk John M. Gillis this week is 
expected to undergo some 
change before the plan gets the 
final go-ahead from the Council. 

Gillis warned that the city 
faces possible court action if it 
does not change its ward lines on 
a balanced population basis. 

Gillis said the present 
six-ward set-up is a violation of 
the "one-man, one-vote 
principle". 

The new eight-wards would 
become effective for this year's 
city election meaning the city 
would have an 1 1 -member 
counojjrieight wajd, and three 
at-large. - 

■jt- <^,«f#iHiy><Juift<>y has, % 
nine-niember council-six ward 
and three at-large. 

The new ward line-up, plus 
the $3,000 salary recently voted 
councillors, is expected to bring 
out the large number of 
contenders-many of them new 
political faces. 

Political observers also feel 
that the $25,000 salary voted 
the mayor will also attract a 
number of candidates for that 
office. 

"ft could be the most 
eventful political year in the 
city's history," said one City 
Hall observer. "There's going to 
be many, many candidates, you 
can be sure of that." 



re-alignment is expected to 
of council candidates in the 

The City Council voted 
Monday night to postpone 
action on the new ward lines 
until Feb. 12. 

Under the plan presented, 
many of the city's 
neighborhoods would be kept 
together. This would not be 
possible with only six wards. 

The city has been under 
threat of court order to 
re-district its wards because the 
present set up is a violation of 
the one man one vote principle. 
For example, Ward 1 with a 
population of 21,1 19 elects one 
councillor while Ward 2 with 
only 8,861 people also elects 
one councillor.. 

The new re-districted wards 
will be of almost equal size, each 
with roughly 1 1 ,000 people. 

Then the new plan was 
presented to the Council there 
were no questions, and it is 
generally believed that the plan 
will be jajjcepted next week 
without much trouble. 

One area that will definitely 
be changed before next week's 
vote, however, involves the 
precincts in the center of the 
■City: Merrymount, Wollaston 
Hill, Quincy Center, 
Merrymount Park and 
Beechwood Knoll. 

The rest of the city is fitted 
together into neighborhood 
wards and seems to have taken a 
definite shape, but these four or 
five precincts have been more or 
less left "hanging". One proposal 
would join Merrymount with the 
Wollaston Beach area to make 
up a waterfront district. 
(Cont'd on Page 31 



Volunteers Needed To Help 
At Food Distribution Center 



City Councillor Joseph J. 
LaRaia has issued a call for 
volunteers to help relieve a 
serious manpower shortage in 
the Food Commodity Program, 
which provides needy families 
with food supplements once a 
month. 

LaRaia warned that the 
program, which serves all welfare 
recipients and others with 



incomes below certain 
guidelines, faces the possibility 
of disruption of services. 

The volunteers are needed at 
the Food Distribution Center, 

86 Sumner St., Quincy Point, to 
fill food orders, stock shelves, 
carry food bundles and do 
clerical duties during the five 
day a month distribution period. 



Former Mayor Burgin Turns 
Over Historic Key To Stadium 



The "father" of Quincy 
Municipal Stadium has turned 
in his key after 35 years. 

Former Mayor Thomas S. 
Burgin sent the key to School 
Supt. Dr. Lawrence P. 
Creedon in hopes that it will 
wind up among the 
mo men toes and other 
trophies connected with the 
stadium and Quincy athletics. 

The key was presented to 
Burgin, who was mayor at the 
time, during dedication 



ceremonies at the stadium on 
Sept. 25, 1938. 

Burgin noted that the then 
City Engineer Gerhard F. 
Schafer, who made the 
presentation of the key, had 
commented: 

"Now, Mr. Mayor, you can 
always enter this much 
needed athletic facility even 
though the gates are locked." 

"I might add," Burgin 
added, "that I have never 
abused this privilege." 






. 



1 . 



Page 2 Quincy Sun Thursday, February 8, 1973 




Louise Forsyth To Receive 
National Education Honors 



Miss Louise B. Forsyth, a 
member of the guidance staff of 
the Quincy Public Schools, has 
been selected to receive national 
honors at the convention of the 
American Personnel and 
Guidance Association being held 
Feb. 8-12 in San Diego, Calif. 

She will be named by the 
American School Counselor 
Association, a division of APGA, 
as the Counselor of the Year, as 
the Guidance Administrator of 
the Year, and as the recipient of 
the Award for Professional 
Writing. This is the first time 
that one person has been so 
honored in all three areas. 

Miss Forsyth coordinates the 
testing program and guidance 
information services for the 
Quincy schools and works with 



students, developing career 
awareness programs and assisting 
with orientation activities. 

Miss Forsyth was nominated 
for the awards by the 
Massachusetts School Counselors 
Association of which she is 
currently executive secretary 
Over a nine years period, she has 
held every elective office in the 
MSCA and served as the first 
woman president. 

She is active in many local, 
state, regional, and national 
professional organizations. In 
Quincy, she serves as moderator 
of Bethany Congregational 
Church and secretary of the 
Board of Directors, Greater 
Quincy Chapter, American Red 
Cross. 



Mayor Hannon To Speak At 
Quincy GOP Women Meeting 



TWENTY-THREE PUPILS from Massachusetts Fields School visited The Quincy Sun Monday to see 
how a newspaper is put together. Here they crowd around Muriel Lyon, typesetter, to watch story of 
their visit on IBM computer system. 

(Quincy Sun Photo] 

23 Massachusetts Fields School 
Pupils Visit Quincy Sun Office 



Mayor Walter J. Hannon will 
speak at the Women's 
Republican Club of Quincy 
meeting Feb. 16 at Wollaston 
Methodist Church. 

A coffee social will start at 1 
p.m. with the meeting following 
at 1:30 p.m. Mrs. Philip G. 
Bourne, president, will preside. 

Members are asked to bring 



articles for the White Elephant 
table. 

Hostesses from Wares 2 and 3 
will be Mrs. William Ash, Mrs. 
Joseph Volpe, Miss Margaret 
Gettotte and Miss Edith 
Cameron. 

Those attending are asked to 
use the Chapman St. entrance to 
the church. 



Twenty-three boys and girls 
from the Massachusetts Fields 
School in Wollaston visited the 
Quincy Sun Monday to pick up 
some tips for the operation of 
their own newspaper, the 
Twenty. 

The youngsters are Fifth 
Grade students of Miss Jane 
McLaughlin, who accompanied 
them on the tour. 

The Twenty, named after 



their home room, is expected to 
be out in its first edition at the 
end of February under the 
editorship of Brian O'Connell 
and Les Parrott. 

They were also accompanied 
around the Sun by two mothers, 
Mrs. Margaret Barrett and Mrs. 
Flora McLean. 

The visitors were Richard W. 
King, Peter Greene, Howard 
Park, Chajlje R eddy, John 



Barrett, Kevin Durkin, Brian 
O'Connell, Les Parrott, Joseph 
Serrilla, Eric Fransoso, Donnie 
Worth, Mary Tenney, Lisa 
Racette, Laurie Stark, Julia 
Stasio, Maureen Malloy, Michelle 
Morris, Julie McLean, Marianne 
Buckley, Colleen McKenna, 
Renee Lemieux, Susan Cahill 
and ElTen Keaney. 

Karen , Thompson couldn't 
make the Xrip because- of illness. 



League To Hold Valentine 
Reception For State Legislators 



State Income Tax Return Assistance At City Hall 



Commissioner Nicholas L. 
Metaxas announces that 
representatives of the 
Department of Corporations and 
Taxation will be at Quincy City 
Hall Feb. 26, 27, 28 and March 



1 - 2, from 9 a.m. until 12:30 
p.m. and from 1:15 until 4:30 
p.m. to assist taxpayers in 
preparing their state income tax 
returns. 

They will also answer 



questions by taxpayers and 
provide needed information. 



The Massachusetts League of 
Women Voters will hold its 
annual Valentine Reception for 
state legislators Feb. 1 4 at Doric 
Hall in the State House from 10 
a.m.' to 1 p.m. 

The event gives local League 
members the opportunity to 
meet with their elected officials 
to discuss matters of mutual 
interest in an informal 



atmosphere. 

Senator Arthur H. Tobin and 
Quincy Reps. Thomas H. 
Brownell, Joseph E. Brett, 
William D. Delahunt aJid 
Clifford H. Marshall have been 
invited to meet with Quincy 
League of Women Voters by 
League President Lillian 
Anderson. 



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8-Ward Plan To Trigger 
Biggest City Council Field 



Thursday, February 8, 1973 Quincy Sun Page 3 



(Cont'd from Page 1) 

While the ward lines are being 
completely re-drawn, precinct 
lines will remain the same and 
most people will continue to 
vote at their regular precinct 
polling places. Under law, the 
precinct lines could not be 
re-drawn at this time. 

Gillis hopes for Council 
action as soon as possible so the 
plan can be sent to the state 
legislature for approval and 
become effective for this fall's 
election. He estimates that it will 
take six weeks for the legislature 
to act on the proposal; just in 
time for the issuance of 
nomination papers in May. 

The re-districting was done 
by the city clerk and board of 
registrars and is the first time 
ward lines have been changed 
since 1888, the year Quincy 
became a city. 

The plan presented Monday 
night would divide the city into 
eight wards as follows: 

• New Ward 1 made up of 
precincts 4, 5, 8 and 9 of the old 
Ward One. This would include 
the areas of Adams Shore, 
Houghs Neck and Germantown. 

• New Ward 2, made up of 
precincts 2, 3, 7 of the old Ward 
1 and precincts 1 and 4 from the 
old Ward 5 composed of Quincy 
Center, Merrymount, 
Merrymount Park and Wollaston 
Hill. 

• New Ward 3, made up of 
precincts 1, 2, 3, 4 of old Ward 2 
and precinct 1 of old Ward 3, 
which is the area around Adams 
School. 

• New Ward 4, made up of 
precincts 1 and 6 of old Ward 1 
and precincts 2, 3, 4 and 5 of 
old Ward 3, which will join the 
Hospital-Presidents Hill and 
Adams St. areas to South 
Quincy. 

• New Ward 5, made up of 
precincts 1, 2, 3, and 4 of old 
Ward 4 and precinct 8 from old 
Ward 5, joining the Forbes Hill 
area with West Quincy. 

• New Ward Six, made up of 
precincts 2 and 6 of old Ward 5 
and precincts 2, 3 and 8 of old 
Ward 6; Montclair and 
Wollaston. 

• New Ward 7, made up of 
precincts 3, 5, 7 and 9 of old 
Ward 5 and precinct 7 of old 
Ward 6, encompasing the 
Wollaston Park and Wollaston 
Beach areas. 

• New Ward 8 is made up of 
precincts 1 , 4, 5 and 6 of the old 
Ward 6; North Quincy, Atlantic 
and Squantum. 

The Council has yet to 
finalize the eight ward design, 
but some candidates have 
already begun their campaigns, 



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not knowing which ward they'll 
be running from or whether 
they'll be running against an 
incumbent or for an open seat. 

In the new Ward 1, one half 
its previous size, observers see 
three potential candidates from 
Houghs Neck - Leo Kelly, 
Robert Denvir and John 
McNally. William Dwyer of 
Adams Shore is also being 
mentioned and incumbent 
Edward Graham of Germantown 
has re-affirmed his position to 
seek re-election. 

The new Ward 2 appears to 
be a hard one to figure right now 
because this area will be 
re-arranged before final Council 
approval is given. As it stands 
now it will be an open seat, with 
no incumbent. Being mentioned 
as candidates from this area are 
Atty. Matt McDonnell and 
Geraldine Pleshaw of 
Merrymount, Atty. Richard 
Ward and Atty. John McGowan 
of Quincy Center, and Atty. 
Warren Powers of Wollaston. 

Quincy Point, the new Ward 
3, is incumbent Clifford 
Marshall's district and he has 
said he will definitely be a 
candidate for re-election. Seen as 
possible contenders are James 
Papile and former Councillor 
Carl W. Anderson. 

The new Ward 4 is set up in 
such a way that Councillor Ted 
McLelland's toughest opponent, 
Peter Gacicia is districted into 
the neighboring Ward 3, as is Pat 
DiStefano. Former City 
Treasurer David Houston and 
Frank McNally are in the new 
ward and may consider a bid for 
ward councillor. 

To the chagrin of Councillor 
Albert Barilaro, his new Ward 5 
picks up a Wollaston precinct. 
Being mentioned as candidates in 
this ward are John Lydort, the 
funeral director, and Atty. Tom 
Hughes. 

New Ward 6 is Councillor 
William Delahunt's ward, but if 
he runs for council-at-large, as 
expected, a scramble would 
develop for the open seat. If the 
seat does open up, one candidate 
will be James Vey of Montclair. 

The biggest political question 
mark in the city is the new Ward 
7. As it stands now, it is an open 
seat, with no incumbent. And 
there are no candidates being 
mentioned yet. 

•New Ward 8, Vincent 
Smyth's ward, is about one half 
its previous size, but still 
contains the home precinct of 
Atty. Dennis Harrington, who is 
expected to face Smyth in a 
re-match this year. 




AWARD WINNER - Robert A. LeNormand displays his watercolor "Flurries on the Mountain' that won 
first prize in the Quincy Art Association Juried exhibit at the Thomas Crane Public Library. Left to 
right, William D'Attilio, exhibit chairman; Annette Paglierani, second prize winner; Mr. LeNormand and 
Eleanor McCarthy, association president. 

[Quincy Sun Photo] 

Ward 2 Civic Association To Hold 'Gripe Night 9 



The Ward 2 Civic Association 
will hold a "Gripe Night" Feb. 
13 at 8 p.m. at Fore River 
Clubhouse, Nevada Rd. 

Residents of Quincy Point are 

invited to "air their gripes" to 

the Association. In return - the 

association will try to resolve the 

gripes . 

The acquisition of the Mound 
Street area by the city will also 
be discussed. 



The following officers were 
recently installed: 

Mrs. Phylis Bagen, president, 
Theodore Harrington, vice 
president, Mrs. Jeanette 
MacDonald, treasurer, Mrs. Nina 
Mayo, recording secretary, Mrs. 
Thomas Williams, corresponding 
secretary. 

Board of Directors: Owen 
Eaton, chairman, James Lyons, 
Kenneth Wilson, Theodore 



DeCristotaro, Councillor 
Clifford Marshall. 

Honored by the association 
for their service to the 
community were: 

Mrs. Grace Wagner, Mrs. 
Marion Andrews, Raymond 
Dunn. Plans are being made for a 
Spring Dance April 14. 



Dinner-Dance, Basketball Game 
To Help North Band To Ireland 



Tickets are available for a 
dinner-dance and a basketball 
doubleheader to help send the 
North Quincy High School band 
to Dublin, Ireland to march in 
the St. Patrick's Day Parade 
there. 

The dinner-dance will be held 
Friday, Feb. 16 at Quincy 
Armory, 1000 Hancock St. A 
social hour will start at 6:30 
p.m. A dinner of ham, roast 
beef, turkey, tossed green salad, 
desert and coffee will be served 
at 7:30 p.m. 

There will be dancing until 
midnight to the music of the 
17-piece Big Band Incorporated. 

Tickets may be obtained 
from band parents, Chairman 
Vito Barresi, Presidents Real 
Estate, 44 Billings Rd, North 
Quincy. 

The basketball doubleheader 
will feature games between 
Quincy firefighters and police 



officers and Quincy and North 
Quincy High school teachers. 

The games will be played 
Feb. 24 at the North Quincy 
High School gym. The 
firefighters and police will 
square off at 6:30 p.m. and the 
faculty teams at 7:45 p.m. 

Tickets are available in the 
offices of the high schools and at 
the Quincy Police Station. 



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Page 4 Quincy Sun Thursday, February 8, 1973 

r- • ' ■ ' 1 '• ..= ■ 



Sunbeams 



By PAUL HAROLD 

The Speculation Corps sees Councillor at-large Joseph LaRaia 
making a bid for Mayor this year. They hear he's already been busy 
lining up campaign workers as well as financial support. 

This would be his second try for the Mayor's office. He first ran 
in 1965 against James Mclntyre. 

Another candidate for Mayor in the 1965 primary was James 
McCormack, former Ward 3 councillor and former state senator. 

In a lopsided victory, Mclntyre topped the three man field in the 
primary and in November went on to be elected to his first term as 
the city's chief executive. LaRaia was runner-up in the primary, with 
McCormack placing third. 

**• 

SPEAKING OF James McCormack, Quincy's other James 
McCormICK, former school committeeman, may also be a candidate 
for Mayor this year. 

Former vice chairman of the school committee, McCormick was a 
candidate for Mayor in 1971 and last year ran for the Democratic 
nomination for Norfolk County Treasurer. 

City elections are about eight months off and there reportedly are 
other candidates for Mayor waiting in the wings. 

IF LaRAIA DOES run, and if Arthur Tobin decides his increased 
responsibilities in the senate demand his full attention, we may see 
two vacancies for councillor-at-large. 

The vacancies would result in a flurry of candidates, among them 
a couple of ward councillors who either "want" to move up ojr 
"have" to move up because they could have trouble getting 
re-elected in their single ward. 

• •*• 

WILLIAM FLAVIN, soloist at the First Parish Church, will sing 
the role of Curly in the New England Regional Opera Company's 
presentation of Carlisle Floyd's "Of Mice and Men". 

It will be presented this weekend, Saturday and" Sunday at the 
Loeb Drama Center in Cambridge. 

Besides music, one of Flavin's interests is history and he serves as 
historian for the First Parish Church. He is also a member of the 
Board of Curators for the Quincy Historical Society. 

*** 

SPEAKING AT THE HINGHAM Women's Day workshop last 
Sunday was Kathleen O'Donnell of Quincy Point. 

Her subject was campaign financing, publicity and issues. 

FORMER MAYOR James Mclntyre will be the featured speaker 
today [Thursday] at the MIT Boston Club's luncheon at the 
Aquarium Restaurant in Boston. 

Appropriately enough, he will speak on the problems facing 

suburban areas. 

• • * 

IN CASE YOU'RE wondering who the artist was who did the 
painting that hangs in the Elections Department office, it was 
Elections employee, Irene Herlihy of Houghs Neck. 

And another Houghs Neck resident who has his painting 
displayed in City Hall is William Callahan. Former chairman of the 
Board of Assessors, Callahan has more than a dozen of his works 
scattered throughout the offices in City Hall. 

• * * 

THREE GALS from the Tax Collector's office are scheduled to 
take off this week for a week's vacation in Bermuda: Fran Morrill, 
Marylow Cahill and Peggy Carloni. 

• • • 

ACROSS THE HALL in the City Clerk's office, Josephine Carnali 
is busy handling the claims of lottery winners. She's busy everyday, 
and when the serial number comes out she's "swamped". 

Incidentally, Mrs. Carnali was a recent $25 winner in the lottery. 

• ** 

WARD 2 Councillor Clifford Marshall represented Mayor Hannon 
last week at the press conference for the Virginia Slims Tennis 
Tournament which will be held in Squantum in about 10 weeks. 

• * * 

HERE'S WHAT WE call a real public servant: Forty-five years ago 
when the late Charles Ross was President of the City Council, he 
saved the lives of two women in what was described as "hairbreath 
rescue". * 

The women were starting to board the 8:29 train for Boston at 
the Quincy Adams Station in South Quincy when a Braintree 
express train came speeding along the track. Ross jumped from the 
platform in time to drag them from the path of the express train 

THE ECOLOGY MOVEMENT has made its impact on the state 
legislature. This year all House and Senate bills are printed on 100 
per cent recycled paper! 

• ** 

ONE BILL HEARD in committee last week [H3276] raised a few 
eyebrows in the State House. The rather unusual proposal would 
hold all elected officials legally liable for promises made during 
campaigns. 

It is expected that the committee will recommend that the bill 
ought not to pass. [It'll probably go down unanimously]. 

*** 

SMILE DEPT: You know, those Quincy Rotarians are dare devils. 
Like this thought from their newsletter: Keep Smiling, it will make 
your wife wonder what you have been up to. 




Jack Anderson 

1972 Pulitzer Prize Winner for National Reporting, and 
Syndicated Columnist for The Quincy Sun 

• Middle East Peace, Pepsi Style 

• War Powers Bill In Making 

• Nixon And Forked Tongue 



WASHINGTON - Is Pepsi- 
Cola quietly at work trying In 
solve l ho Middle East crisis'.' 

P e p s i - c o I a president 
Donald Kendall is trying to 
put Egypt's most influential 
editor. Muhammad Heykal. 
together with White House 
foreign policy c/ar. Henry 
Kissinger. 

Kendall first suggested to 
Heykal back in 1971 lli.il In- 
come to Washington for a 
visit with Kissinger, but 
Heykal turned down the in- 
vitation. Now. we understand. 
Heykal has expressed in- 
terest in meeting Kissinger. 

The meeting would be sig- 
nificant Heykal is known to 
have the ear of Egypt's Presi- 
dent Sadat and could pave 
the way for a new peace ap- 
proach in the Middle East. 

Kendall, meanwhile, has 
been able In pull diplomatic- 
strings in Cairo because he is 
known In he a personal friend 
of President Nixon The 
Egyptian authorities remem- 
ber that Nixon came In Cairo 
in 1963 as Kendall's represen- 
tative pushing Pepsi-Cola. 

Avoiding High Noon 

Congressional leaders have 
raised an almighty howl over 
President Nixon's encroach- 
ment <m their" constitutional 
authority We have predicted, 
however, that the issue would 
be settled in the backrooms. 
This prediction already has 
started In come true. 

The sett|emcn{ of the Viet- 
nam war has increased tin- 
President's prestige and has 
taken some of the steam out of 
his congressional opposition. 
He. in turn, has taken Senate 
Democratic Leader Mike 
Mansiield aside and has pro- 
mised to work out a better 
relationship with Congress. 

The President has indicated 
he will send his top aides, in- 
cluding Henry Kissinger, to 
give congressional groups 
regular private briefings. He 
may also join Congress in sup- 
porting, rather than opposing, 
restrictions on his war-mak- 
ing powers. 

Senate Republican Leader 
Hugh Scott has hinted he 
would support a war-powers 
bill. The bill would recognize 
the President's right to res- 
pond to a military emergency. 
But it would require him to 
seek a declaration of war 
from Congress if he wanted to 
continue miliiary action 
beyond 30 days. 

the White House will take 
the attitude that the bill isn't 
aimed against President Nix- 



For Home 

Or Office 

Delivery 




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471-3100 



on but is intended to prevent 
any future president from 
conducting undeclared, 
unlimited wars. 

It may be more difficult, 
however, to settle the great 
spending battle. President 
Nixon is still insisting upon his 
right to impound funds that 
Congress wants to spend. Con- 
gressional leaders claim this 
violates their constitutional 
power over the purse. 

But this showdown, too, pro- 
bably will never reach high 
noon. No issue is too great, if 
there's any risk of political 
embarrassment, that politi- 
cians of both parties won't set- 
tle their differences quietly in 
the backrooms. 

Forked Tongue? 

President Nixon in his in- 
augural address called for 
more volunteer action and 
less reliance on the govern- 
ment. Environmental groups 
had been doing exactly what 
the President advocated. Yet, 
astonishingly, the Nixon Ad- 
ministration has been work- 
ing against citizen participa- 
tion. 

This is documented in an 
un released 600- page govern- 
ment-funded study, which 
offers the first comprehensive 
look at volunteer environ- 
mental groups around the 
country. 

The trouble is that these 
groups have brought pressure 
on the government to crack 
down harder on industries 
that have been fouling the en- 
vironment. Apparently, this 
wasn't the sort of citizen par- 
ticipation the President had 
in mind in his inaugural 
remarks. The 600-page 
report, therefore, has been 
kept quiet. 

However, we have obtained 
a bootleg copy. It suggests 
that government agencies, 
especially the EPA, are 
"defaulting on their basic 
responsibility to aggressively 
promote citizen participa- 
tion." 

The report cites the fre- 
quent complaint of environ- 
mental groups that govern- 
ment agencies and private in- 
dustries cooperate in refusing 
to release basic information 
that the volunteers need. In- 
stead, government and indus- 
try prefer to swamp the 
volunteers with information 
thai the report describes as 
"self-serving." 



When useful information is 
squeezed out of the govern- 
ment, it usually is provided at 
the last po"ible moment. This 
is why many environmental 
groups seem so crisis- 
oriented. They are unable to 
act until the last stages of the 
decision-making process. 

Meanwhile, citizen groups are 
forced to oppose projects until 
they can evaluate them. 

The report also criticizes 
EPA and other federal agen- 
cies for the way they conduct 
environmental hearings. 
These hearings often provide 
the only opportunity for volun- 
teers to participate in en- 
vironmental decisions. Yet 
the report charges that hear- 
ings usually take place after 
the basic decisions are made 

The report concludes that 
despite the many achieve- 
ments of the volunteers, "we 
often found a feeling of help- 
lessness.. .(and) a deep sense oi 
frustration and distrust that 
extends to the whole govern- 
mental process." 

Headlines and Footnotes 

MURDER UNSOLVED - 
Almost three years ago, Colet- 
te MacDonald and her two 
children were brutally mur- 
dered at Fort Bragg, North 
Carolina. Colette's husband 
Jeffrey, an Army captain, at 
first was charged with the 
murder, but through the 



efforts of her 
Kassab, the 
cleared of all 
Mr. Kassab 
pressuring 



father. Alfred 
captain was 
charges. Now, 
is personally 
the Justice 
Department to keep the case 
open. He tells us that he is sure 
Justice knows who the real 
killer is, but is not yet ready to 
bring charges. 

BOY SCOUT SUBSIDY - 
Troops at Fort Lee. Virginia, 
were quietly converted into 
boy scout counselors last sum- 
mer at taxpayer's expense. 
Post commander Gen. John 
McLaughlin ordered dozens of 
officers and enlisted men of 
the 96th Civil Affairs batallion 
to troop up to Camp Brady 
Saunders in Oilville, Va., to 
help the boy scouts. The 
soldiers, we have learned, 
prepared and served 31.000 
meals, built numerous struc- 
tures and counseled a total of 
2.500 boys. The official esti- 
mate of costs to the Armv: 
$32,000. 




Published weekly on Thursday by 

The Quincy Sun Publishing Company 

1601 Hancock St., Quincy Massachusetts 02169 

Publisher and Editor 

Henry W. Bosworth, Jr. 

Advertising Director 
John B. Powers 

10* Per Copy - $3.50 Per Year - Out of State $4.50 Per Year 

Telephone: 471-3100 471-3101 471-3102 

Second-Class Postage Paid at Boston, Mass. 

MEMBER NEW ENGLAND PRESS ASSOCIATION 

The Quincy Sun assumes no financial responsibility for 
typographical errors in advertisements but will reprint that part of 
an advertisement in which the typographical error occurs 



mm 



^ _ 



• Youth Speaks Out 

• Tom Johnson was fired, but he wasn't the one who let Cheevers, 
Sanderson, Westfall, Green, and MacKenzie get away. Somebody else 
should have been fired. 

• President Nixon has pledged %2Vi billion to rebuild North 
Vietnam, and at the same time refused to grant amnesty. We rebuild 
the enemy's country and help its people who killed 50,000 
American boys, and yet we can't forgive our own citizens. 

• It's hard to understand that with the ceasefire in effect and the 
draft ended, why the defense budget goes up and up and up, 
especially when human services are being drastically cut. 

• It's Income Tax time again - that's when if you make nothing, you 
pay nothing; and if you make plenty, you pay nothing; but if you 
make a little, you pay everything. 

• Plans are going ahead on all fronts to celebrate the U.S. 
bicentennial in 1976. Depending on what happens in the '76 
elections, Massachusetts may secede. 

• It used to be that when you said "Everybody talks about it but 
nobody does anything about it", everyone knew you were talking 
about the weather; but now you could be talking about gun control. 

QHS Journalism Class 

•Letter Box 

Appreciates Gildea Letter 
On Water Dept: Employees 



Editor, Quincy Sun: 

Thank you, Mr. Gildea Sr. for 
your nice piece in the letter box 
of the Quincy Sun, commending 
the timely and efficient service 
rendered you in your plight with 
a broken water pipe, by the two 
employees of the Water Dept. 

Having served on the 
emergency night shift for nearly 
seven years 1 understand the 
predicament you were in. 
Knowing the two gentlemen in 
question, I am sure they did a 
fine job. 

Your letter was a far cry from 
the charges leveled that the 
Water Dept. workers were a 
bunch of drunks and that the 
dept. was a hornets nest. The 
buzzing around working that we 
do may have led to the belief 
that we were hornets. 
Sometimes when we called the 
highway men from our truck I 
used the call, Green Hornet to 
Yellow Jacket. [Our truck was 
green and their truck is yellow.] 

I wonder where the Union 
Representatives were hiding 
when these charges were flying 
around. 

Before I finish I would like to 



state my thought on the reason 
for so many houses without 
water meters. When the meters 
were put in the budget the 
number of meters requested and 
the amount received was quite 
different. You cannot replace a 
flat tire if you do not have a 
spare. 

As a worker in the Water 
Dept. for nearly 26 years, I 
think I have a little knowledge 
of what has gone on here. Each 
dept. has a handful of men that 
have a problem which finally has 
been diagnosed as a sickness but 
I could name 20 or more men in 
this dept. who have worked 
many days of hard work and 
many times all thru the night to 
repair water breaks, pump out 
flooded cellars etc., and then 
report at 7:30 the following 
morning for their usual days 
work, and this would amount to 
a 32-hour stretch. I wrote this 
letter in red ink so it could not 
be given the so-called white-wash 
job. 

Edward Kane 

53 Bicknell St., Quincy 

[Laborer, motor equipment 

operator and now working 

foreman]. 



Indiana Newspaper, Professor 
Seek Comments On McGovern 



Readers of Quincy Sun: 

The editor of the Muncie 
[Indiana] Evening Press and I 
are trying to gather opinions of 
readers of newspapers in 
Massachusetts concerning the 
vote for president in the 
November, 1972, elections. 

We agreed that voters might 
well have interesting and useful 
comments on why 
Massachusetts, alone among the 
50 states, cast a majority of 
votes for Senator McGovern. We 
thought a collection of ideas at 



this distant point might lend 
objectivity to the understanding 
of a matter which may shed 
early light on the presidential 
election of 1976. 

Thank you in advance for 
your ideas. If this letter is 
printed, it means that your 
editor thinks the project has a 
chance of producing useful 
information. 

William A. Sutton 

Professor of English 

Ball State University 

3311 Torquay Rd 

Muncie, Ind., 47304 



A 'Thank You 9 
From Bethany Church 



Editor, Quincy Sun: 

During the past year the 
Quincy Sun publicized a number 
of events and services of 
Bethany Congregational Church 
which might have interest for 
the general public and we are 
most appreciative of this service. 
The articles in the Sun informed 
people beyond our own 
congregation of activities open 
to them and may have brought 
wider participation. 



In 1972 you reported on our 
ministers' sermon series based on 
"The People of the Book", on 
the Dial-a-Prayer telephone 
service, our Homecoming 
Sunday, the special worship 
services, and the choir festival 
which involved twelve church 
choirs. We are grateful for this 
opportunity to publicize 
activities to the public. 

Thank you! 

[Miss] Louise B. Forsyth 
Moderator 



Consumer 
Corner 



» " - 



By ROBERT H. QUINN 

Attorney General 

Mobile home park residents 
will no longer be at the mercy of 
park owners if the Massachusetts 
Legislature passes a bill filed by 
my Consumer Protection 
Division. This bill establishes 
standards for mobile home park 
operators and provides penalties 
for any violations. 

Due to zoning regulations in 
certain cities and towns the 
owner of a trailer must reside in 
a trailer park. However, a trailer 
park resident is also a tenant 
paying monthly rent for a plot 

of land. 

Under present law, park 
owners may forbid tenants to 
keep pets, require certain 
upkeep of the trailer or even 
designate the utility company 
, tenants must use. In addition, a 
trailer park owner has the right 
to evict a tenant at any time, for 
any reason. 

The proposed legislation 
provides that occupancy may 
only be terminated for 
non-payment of rent; substantial 
violation of any enforceable rule 
in the park; and violation of any 
laws protecting the health and 
safety of other residents. 
However, the bill gives tenants 
15 days to pay any overdue rent 
or reverse any violations of rules 
or laws in order to avoid 
eviction. 

The bill requires full 
disclosure of all terms and 
conditions of occupancy. Under 
the measure a park owner may 
not restrict the prospective or 
established mobile home owner 
in choosing a trailer dealer 
furnishings or seller of fuel. 

Many trailer park owners 
require tenants to pay a fee-up 
to 35% of the sale price-for the 
privilege of selling trailers within 
the trailer park. If tenants refuse 
to pay the commission, they 
must remove their trailers from 
the lot. 

Due to the expense and 
complication of relocating a 
mobile home, a tenant is almost 
forced to abide by the park 
rules. If he refuses, a park owner 
may evict him. 

The bill regulating mobile 
home parks prohibits charging 
fees or commissions for the sale 
of mobile homes. However, if a 
mobile home owner requests 
that the park owner sell his 
home, the park owner may 
charge a fee not to exceed 10% 
of the sale price. 




VALENTINE'S 
DAY 

Valentine's Day is Designated 
As a "special day of love," 
Expressing our innate feelings 
For affection: Be it parent, 
Spouse, relative, or a 
Dear friend; but ... 
Cupid outshines them all in 
Popularity and 
Demonstration 

As "sweethearts", exchange 
Tokens of their Love, with 
Heart-shaped gifts wrapped 
With Care and Tenderness. 

Brighten and Lighten 

Someone's 

Heart -beat with cherriness, 
Blessed with thoughts of 
Endearment, as we pay 

homage 

To an Inspiring Message of a 
Great Martyr, Saint 

Valentine. 

Anna T. Anderson, Quincy 



Thursday, February 8, 1973 Quincy Sun Page 5 

■ • ^ * ■ ■ ■ * ■ ■ — 



Living, Today 

By Or. William F. Knox 
Personal Counselor 



'Our No. 1 Problem....Marriage' 

Replying to a woman in a Probate Court who had complained 
"I'm just not happy in this marriage," the Judge answered her, 
"Happy! Who's happy?" Was this reply a reflection of his own 
life. ..or the conclusion of the evidence he hears all day long in his 
courtroom? I don't know who counted them, but I am told that 
75% of all married people are unhappy. Little is being done to 
change this condition. ..as though assuming "this is the way it has to 
be." I just can't accept that! 

Our Number One Problem is the Marriage Dilemma. No longer is 
it the Viet Nam War. ..unemployment. ..inflation. ..nor even the race 
question. It's unhappiness in marriage. Many people feel trapped, 
but unable to get out. Why? Different reasons: "it would kill my 
parents". ..Church rules... financial insecurity... fear of being on one's 
own. For whatever cause an unhappy marriage is a TRAP. 

With continual unhappiness, there follows the awful results of 
emotional and physical illness. ..exhaustion. ..fatigue. ..loss of sense of 
manhood/womanhood. ..loss of life drive. ..anxiety. ..depression. Such 
conditions take their toll. Great unhappiness upsets the 
social. ..chemical. ..organic functioning of the whole personality. 

Why can't people be happy in marriage? They can, if.. .IF they are 
prepared for marriage. This is the first big IF. Many people aren't 
prepared. ..so they bumble along. Like David who grew up in a home 
where his mother was extremely domineering. ..told him everything 
to do.. .or not to do. His father was silent. ..turned over his check on 
Friday nights. ..drank his beer in the basement. Now at 30. ..a weak, 
indecisive man. ..married to Georgia. ..both are unhappy because 
Georgia is looking for him to take his part as a man and no one ever 
taught or showed him how to do it. 

The second IF. ..if they are personally mature and secure. Persons 
cannot be the possession of another person. "My husband". .."my 
wife". ..must not mean you own that person as you own your 
dog. ..to do your bidding. ..respond to your commands. ..provide 
emotional security for you. There must be maturity in each person 
which provides sufficient security that you don't have to cling to the 
partner for survival. This crushes love. Love thrives not by being 
throttled. ..but in freedom. 

The third IF. ..if two people want to be together. ..want to because 
they like each other. ..like to do things together. ..like to talk 
together. COMPANIONSHIP AS EQUALS. ..that's the key. If you 
feel forced to be together. ..if you feel trapped. ..it's probable that 
you're both unhappy in the marriage. 

"What can I do about my unhappy dilemma?" It's almost 
impossible to analyze and counsel oneself successfully. It's wise to 
seek a good counselor. ..a competent person who's had enough 
trouble himself/herself to feel what you feel. ..and enough successful 
experience in counseling others to understand and lead you out of 
your unhappy dilemma. . 

Or go to a marriage therapy group. More and more people are 
getting help in the group with a capable leader to guide. We see- 
weekly how happiness is being restored. ..support felt for new 
decisions and new courses of action. If for others. ..why not for you? 

"Happy! Who's Happy?" Maybe you can be. ..if you decide to do 
something about it. 

FOR YOUR COMMENTS: Group Therapy or Private Counseling, 
write Di. Knox at 628 High St., Dedham, Mass. 02026, or call 
326-5990 or 659-7595. 

For Dr. Knox's new book, People Are For Loving, write him 
sending $3 to 320 Washington St., Norwell, Mass. 0206 1 



TICKLE BOX 



by Ted Trogdon 




"You can finish lecturing me on male 
supremacy after you've done the dishes." 



'*- 



defects 
are forever. 




0** 'i 




unless you help. 






1 



- 






! 



TMI» SFACC CONTWIUTID »T TBI rU»LI«M«« 



§ 



Page 6 Quincy Sun Thursday, February 8, 1973 




ENGAGED ~ Mr. and Mrs. Warren C. Perkins of 11 Flynt St., North 
Quincy, announce the engagement of their daughter, Dianne 
Elizabeth to John R. Finnell. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. William 
J. Finnell of 46 Kendall St., North Quincy. Miss Perkins is a graduate 
of North Quincy High School, and is attending Quincy Junior 
College. Mr. Finnell is employed by Gino's Inc. An October wedding 
is planned. 

[Fasch Studio] 

Trinity February Group To See 
Finland Slides Feb. 15 



The February Group plans an 
evening of slides on Finland and 
special music Feb. 15 at 7:30 
p.m. at Trinity Lutheran 
Church, Roberts St., South 
Quincy. 

Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Maki 
will show slides taken in Finland 
during their trip to that country 
last summer. \ 

Special musics and songs will 
be by John Hedlund, Paavo 
Kujala and Toivo Tuori. 

Members of |he February 
Group are: \ 

Co-chairmen m\. and Mrs. 
\ 

A 



Weikjco Luoma and Mr. and Mrs. 
Theodore Maki; Mr. and Mrs. 
Dominic Ferrisi, Mr. and Mrs. 
Ralph Ferrisi, Mrs. Helen 
Andrews, Mrs. Elsie Salorio, Mr. 
and Mrs. Seivi Harju, Mr. and 
Mrs. John Hedlund, Mrs. Hilja 
Niemi, Mrs. Suoma Kantonen, 

Mrs. Lyyli Luoma, Mrs. Ida 
Peterson, Mrs. Lillian 
Svartstrom, Mrs. Hulda 
Waihkonen, Mrs. Lunn Laneau 
and Mr. and Mrs. Allan Wesanen. 
Refreshments will be served. 
The public is invited. 



'Nite Owls' Dance Saturday 

The "Nite Owl's" will hold a High School Ave., Saturday at 8 

p.m. 
dance at the Drop-in Center, 24 Chairman is Pauline Maki. 



COLPITIS 5K¥K 

1550 Hancock St., Quincy 472-005 1 

Call Colpitts Now 472-0051 

Take A 
Bermuda Break 

In Rendezvous Time' 

We will be happy to 
arrange your vacation! 



$ 



Off Season Rates Are Now 
In Effect Until March 




At Quincy City Hospital 

January 29 

Mr. and Mrs. Nelio DiTullio, 
104 Lancaster St., a daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Spencer N. 
Graham, 63 Atlantic St., a 
daughter. 

January 30 

Mr. and Mrs. Philip Rugnetta, 
1060 Furn?ce Brook Parkway, a 
daughter. 

January 31 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Buckley, 
28 Hall Place, a son. 

Mr. and Mrs. William 
Pomfret, 1210 Sea St., a son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard 
Reynolds, 4 Gordon St., a son. 

February 1 

Mr. and Mrs. William Van 
Meter, 6 Miller Stile Road, a 
daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael Cronin, 
1 15 Fifth Ave., a daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. James Labadie, 
50'/2 Smith St., a daughter. 

February 2 

Mr. and Mrs. James Carson, 
28 Loring St., a son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Roy, 
568 Sea St., a son. 

February 3 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. 
McClelland, 67 Cedar St., a son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael R. 
Ferris, 46 Braintree Ave., a son. 

February 4 

Mr. and Mrs. Erminio R. 
DiBona, 16 Bedford St., a son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis J. Lipani, 
47 Mill St., a son. 

At South Shore Hospital 

January 29 

Mr. and Mrs. John Barilaro, 
17 Dunnis Court, a son. 

r *************************** 
PERMANENT REMOVAL * 

OF UNWANTED HAIR 
Lola F. Kilduff, R.E. 

Registered and Licensed Electrologist 

t For Men and Women 

By Appointment Only - Day or Evening 
* Consultations Invited 

e A JUNIOR COLLEGE 
FOR WOMEN 

e ACCREDITED RY 
A.C.R.S. ' 

• CONFERS ASSOCIATE 
DEGREE 




ENGAGED - Mr. and Mrs. Mendo G. Saluti of 73 Sagamore St., 
Braintree, announce the engagement of their daughter Sarah Alice to 
Alfred Loeh, son of Mrs. Dorette Loeh of Hamburg, Germany. Miss 
Saluti is attending Newmen College where she will graduate in May. 
Mr. Loeh is employed by Morgan Hughes, Inc., of New Jersey and 
Hamburg, Germany as Manager and Field Representative. Miss Saluti 
is the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph W. O'Brien of Wollaston 
and St. Petersburg, Fla., and the late Mr. and Mrs. Guido Saluti of 
Quincy. 

[William J. Hayden] 

Quincy Lions Club Planning 
Roaring 20's Dance March 24 



The Quincy Lion's Club is 
planning a "Roaring 20's Dance" 
to be held Saturday, March 24fh 
from 8 p.m. to 1 a.m. at the 
Quincy Armory. 

Proceeds will be presented to 
Massachusetts Eye Research. 

Music will be by the Six Pages 
of Dixie. Events will also include 
a beer drinking, costume, and 
Charleston contest, and a 
sing-a-long. 

Tickets are available at Shea's 
Formica Center, 809 Hancock 
St., Turners Hardware, 471 
Hancock St., Houghs Neck 
Package Store, 1185 Sea St., 
Sherry's Restaurant, 579 



Southern Artery, South Shore 
National Bank at James 
Sullivan's desk, 1400 Hancock 
St. and Norfolk County Trust 
Company at Roger Perfett's 
desk, 1 38 1 Hancock St. 

Everett Tatreau is general 
chairman of the Fund Raising 
Committee, Roger Hamel is 
ticket chairman. Assisting are, 
John Swanson, George Riley, 
Robert N«wman, Everett 
Tatreau and Alexander Smith. 

Also Robert Galligan, Roger 
Perfetti, Joseph Doherty, 
William Shea, Matthew McKeon, 
Aldern Zuern, Dr. James Will 
and William O'Connell. 




Liberal Arts 

Fashion Merchandising 

General Studies 



Secretarial Science 
—-Executive 
— Legal 
— Medical 
— Therapeutic 



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Thursday, February 8, 1973 Quincy Sun Page 7 




ENGAGED - Mr. and Mrs. Vaughn C. Driscoll of 1 Pearl St., Quincy 
announce the engagement of their daughter Elaine Patricia to 
Thomas Welby, son of Mrs. Marion Welby and the late Thomas E. 
Welby of 114 Hillside Ave., Wollasjon. Miss Driscoll attended 
Quincy High School and is now employed by the City of Quincy 
Tax Department. Mr. Welby attended Xaviar Brothers High School 
and is now attending Boston College. There are no immediate 
wedding plans. 

[Miller Studio] 

Stella Del Nord Valentine 
Dinner Dance Saturday 



' Stella 
Quincy, 



Del Nord Lodge "of 

will hold its annual 

Valentine Dinner ' Dance 

^Saturday at the Sons of Italy 

M 'S^iaf Center orVtfuarry'St. ; '.; 

Proceeds will gd to the 
'Scholarship Fund'. 

Tickets may be purchased 
fronv Mrs. Mary Johnson, 



honorary chairlady, Mrs. 
Vincent Buonfiglio, chairlady; 
Mrs/. Robert Tenaglia, Mrs. 
Ricardo Cesiani, Mrs. Louis 
Arieriti, Mrs. Paul Mayo, , Mrs. 
Donald Heath, Mrs. Richard 
Kelly and Miss Mary Ruscpni. 

Dinner will be served by 
Frank Basile. Gil Lorings 
orchestra will provide the music. 



Quincy Women Of Moose 
Class Enrollment Feb. 14 



Quincy Chapter, Women of 
the Moose, will meet 
Wednesday, Feb. 14 at 8 p.m. in 
Moose Hall, 175 West Howard 
St., Braintree. 

Mrs. Blanche Burnett will 
preside. A class enrollment of 
new members will be held. 



Plans are being made for a 
Valentine Dance to be held 
Saturday Feb. 17 at 8 p.m. A 
buffet supper will be served. 
Deadline for tickets is Feb. F4. 

A miscellaneous sale will be 
held Feb. 14. Members will bring 
prizes. Signe Whitehouse will be 
hostess. 



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Mon., Wed., Fri. 9 to 9 
Toe., Thur., Sat. 9 '.o 5:30 





One of the Moti REASONABLE FLORISTS 
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94 WASHINGTON ST. WEYMOUTH LANDING 



Wollaston 

Juniors 

Meet Tonight 

The board of the Wollaston 
Women's Club Juniors will meet 
tonight (Thursday] at 8:30 p.m. 
at the home of Mrs. Cornelius 
Quirk, 64 J St., Hull, with Mrs. 
Joseph Del Rosso and Mrs. Ray 
Radford co-hostesses. 

Next Wednesday (Feb. 141 at 
1 p.m. the Juniors will hold a 
spaghetti luncheon at the home 
of Mrs. Alan Sarruda, 181 Elliot 
Ave., North Quincy, for the 
benefit of the Ways and Means 
Committee. Mrs. Henry Cheney 
is co-chairman with Mrs. 
Sarruda. 

Blue Hills 
Masters 
To Meet 

B lue Hills Masters and 
Lecturers Association will meet 
Feb. 19 at 8 p.m. in Fore River 
Grange Hall, 1047 Front St., 
South Weymouth. 

Mrs. Lillian Wall, President, 
will conduct the meeting. 

The Choral Group are 
entertaining at the Crestview 
Nursing ; Home, Greenleaf St., 
Quincy, Feb. 18 at 2:30 p.m. 
They will have a rehearsal 
Sunday at 3 p.m. at the Fore 
River Grange Hall. 

Program Director William 
Morrison will conduct. Mrs. 
Helen McCue will be hostess for 
the Feb. 19 meeting. 




Marriage 

Intentions 



-»-»" — i. ' I ,, i 



ENGAGED - Mr. and Mrs. William J. Fitzgerald of 59 Lenox St., 
Quincy, announce the engagement of their daughter, Helen Marie, to 
Robert A. MacDonald, son of Mr. and Mrs. John A. MacDonald of 
344 Rock Island Rd, Quincy. Miss Fitzgerald, a graduate of Quincy 
High School and Katherine Gibbs School is employed in the 
executive offices of Stop 8t Shop. Mr. MacDonald is a graduate of 
Boston College High School and is now attending Northeastern 
University. An Oct. 6 wedding is planned. 

[Miller Studio] 

Morrisette Auxiliary 
To Hold Dance Feb. 17 



I T^rnbthy^B. ! T6rmey\ 154 
Putnam St., Quincy, \J.S.' Navy; 
Patricia R. MacKenzie, 433 Sea 
St., Quincy, secretary. 

Joseph A. Bernardo, 10 
Skyline Drive, Braintree, 
hairstylist; Denise A. Palmer, 
197 Franklin St., Quincy, 
retailer. 



Morrisette Legion Post Ladies 
Auxiliary will sponsor a dance 
Feb. 17 at 8 p.m. at the Post 
Hom,e. ., 

Mrs. Rose Broad ford will be 
chairman. 

"Roger- and The Four Leaf 
Clover" will be the band. 
Tonight [Thursda>] from 7 -9 
p.m. a Beano Party will be held 
for veterans at the West 
1 Roxbury VA Hospital. Those 
assisting will be Mrs., Mary 
Woodhouse, Past Director of 



Quin.cy Sons Of Italy 
Social Center 

i20 Quarry St. Quincy 

Newest function hall now available for weddings, showers, dinner 
dances. Main [Golden Lion] Suite has cathedral ceiling. Brides 
room • ultra modern sound system. Completely air conditioned. 

FOR RESERVATION CALL 
773-2687 AFTER 2 PJK. 



NOW OPEN 



mi 



ELLA 
EAUTY 

SALON 

549 WASHINGTON ST. 
QUINCY 



Phone: 773-0387 
Appointment or Walk-in Strv/ct 

Hours: Tves.. Wei., Fri.. Sit. 9:00 to 5:31 PJ. 
Thus. 1:80 P.M. ts 9:86 P.M. 



Please Let Us Introduce You To Our New 
Shop At Our Expense f. 

1.Rr$tTw«Week$SbowpoolStt . . !4 PHctj 

2. first Month All Ptrmaiwflts fl Prkt 

3.Fir$t«oithAIITIiH$ ....6 50 



Norfolk County, who will be 
chairman; Mrs.* Eloise Spear, 
Mrs. Gertrude Paakonen, Mrs. 
Marion Kinsman, Miss Marie 
LoCicero, Mrs. Marie Thornton 
and Mrs. Edna Murphy. 

The Wollaston and Quincy 
Units will participate also. 

The "Sing-A-Long" group 
meets at the Post Home every 
third Tuesday of the month at 
6:30 p.m.. Mrs. Agnes Barilaro, 
Mrs. Dorothy Wing (pianist], 
Miss Marie LoCicero, Mrs. Esther 
Gallant, Mrs. Bonnie Marrino, 
Mrs. Jeanne Green and Mrs. 
Edna Murphy are regulars at the 
West Roxbury VA Hospital 
"Sing-A-Long". 

On Feb. 13 at 8 p.m. the 
regular business meeting will be 
held 

Jaycees To Hold 
'Fabulous Fifties' 

The Quincy Jaycees are 
holding a "Fabulous Fifties" 
night at the Fore River 
Clubhouse at 8 p.m. Friday. 

The night will feature a 
buffet and continuous 
entertainment with a live rock 
band playing nostalgic music out 
of the 1950*8. 

Tickets will be available at 
the door. 



DERRINGER 

THE FLORIST 

Hants Arrangements l-'lawers 

389 Hancock St. 773-0959 



J&litS 




1422 Hancock St.^^ 
Quincy. Ma« ^*« 

773-2170 

• DIAMOND APPRAISING 

• ESTATE APPRAISING 

• GEMSTONE 

IDENTIFICATION 
« FREE CONSULTATION 

.ROBERT a FREEMAN 
CERTIFIED GEMOLOGIST 
AMERICAN GEM SOCIETY 









Page 8 Quincy Sun Thursday, February 8, 1973 

Eileen Sullivan Engaged To Brian M. McMahon 

M, „_J W__ n- i „ «. 



Mr. and Mrs. Richard C. 
Sullivan of 12 Plymouth Ave., 
Braintree Highlands, announce 
the engagement of their 
daughter, Eileen E. Sullivan to 



Brian M. McMahon, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. John J. McMahon of 15 
Lunt St., North Quincy. 

Miss Sullivan is a graduate of 
Braintree High School and is 




GOING OVER LINES for Curtain Call Theatre production of "Dear 
Me, The Sky Is Falling", to be pre'sented on Feb. 16, 17 and 19 at 
Central Junior High School, Washington St., Braintree at 8:30 p.m. 
are [seated] Joan Fisher of Hull, Terry Theriault of Quincy and, 
standing, Bill Wanders of Hingham, Betty Budlong of Hingham and 
Diane Purdy of Weymouth, director. 

[Ralph Sanford Photo] 



employed by the New England 
Telephone Company at its 
Upland Rd, Quincy, offices. 

Mr. McMahon is a graduate of 
North Quincy High School and 
is a Navy Veteran. He is also 
employed by "the New England 
Telephone Company. 

A May 12 wedding is being 
planned at St. Clare's Church, 
Braintree Highlands. 

Granite City 
Grange Meets 

Granite City Grange met 
recently in the Senior Citizens 
Drop-In Center, 24 High School 
Ave., Quincy with Mrs. Mary 
Berry, Master, presiding. 

Blue Hills Pomona 
representative Mrs. Dorothy 
Kendall reported on Pomona 
activities and meetings. 

The Tambourine Group of 
the Past Masters Association 
entertained with Elva Robbins as 
pianist. 

Deputy Robert Sweet will 
make his official visit to Granite 
City Grange Feb. 26 at 8 p.m. 
The First and Second Degrees 
will be conferred on a class of 
candidates. 

A minute of Silence was 
observed out of respect to late 
President Lyndon B. Johnson. 

Ethel Pearson was hostess for 
the evening. William Morrison 
was reported to be ill at his 
home. 



Try our 
money for 
one year. 



If, cfter one-year, you do not find our 
interest payments satisfactory, (they are the 
highest possible rates allowed by law), just 
ask for your deposits back. They will' be 
cheerfully refunded and you get to keep every 
penny we have paid in interest. 



Satisfaction Guaranteed and your 
money back. 

All savings insured in full.You can withdraw 

your money at any time except on term deposits 

which are a two year minimum.' 




MILESTONE - Mr. and Mrs. Leslie Bailey of 22 Kemper St. 
Wollaston were honored on their 50th wedding anniversary. 

Mr., Mrs. Leslie Bailey 
Mark 50th Anniversary 



Mr. and Mrs. Leslie Bailey of 
22 Kemper St., Wollaston, 
celebrated their 50th wedding 
anniversary recently at a buffet 
dinner party. 

The couple were married in 
Brighton on Jan. 13, 1923. Mrs. 
Bailey is the former Elgia Edson. 

There were more than 40 
guests at the party held at the 
home of their son and 
daughter-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. 
Albert Edson of East Mount 
Vernon St., Weymouth. 

The Bailey's have six other 
children: Mrs. John [Emily] 



Giffin of Wilton, N.H., Elbridge 
Edson of Nashua, N.H., Mrs. 
Kenneth [Ruth] Cahoon of 
Tulsa, Okla., Kenneth Edson of 
Pembroke, Mrs. Thomas 
[Lillian] Voislow of Quincy and 
Leslie Bailey of California. They 
also have 21 grandchildren and 
21 greatgrandchildren. 

Before retiring, Mr. Bailey 
was a tool maker at the Boston 
Gear Works. The couple have 
lived in Quincy all of their 
married lives and on Kemper St. 
for the past 10 years. 



S.S. Mothers Of Twins 
To Hear Dr. Edward Casey 



The South Shore Mothers of 
Twins Club will hold its regular 
meeting at 8 p.m. Feb. 12 at the 
George Bean Legion Post, 19 
Hollis St., South Weymouth. 

Guest speaker will be Dr. 
Edward S. Casey, Braintree 
obstetrician and gynecologist. 
He will discuss the menopause 
and related subjects. 

Reservations for 
Grandmothers' Night, to be held 
March 12, should be made by 
Feb. 28 with the chairman Mrs. 
Richard Rose. A catered chicken 
dinner will preceed a program by 



graphoanalyst, John S. Swanson. 
The National Organization of 
Mothers of Twins Club, Inc. is 
presently formulating plans for 
its' annual convention to be held 
during July in Minneapolis, 
Minn. Last year's convention 
was hosted by the South Shore 
Club. 

Prospective members seeking 
further information about the 
club should contact the 
membership secretary, Mrs. 
Joseph L. Keenan of 48 Idlewell 
St., Weymouth. 



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Thursday, February 8, 1973 Quincy Sun Page 9 



100% Revaluation Vehemently Opposed 9 



Merrymount Association To Install Officers Saturday Night 



Margaret Gibbons will be 
installed for another term as 
president of the Merrymount 
Association in ceremonies at the 
Torre Dei Passari Social Club, 
Washington St., Saturday at 
8:30 p.m. 

Newly elected officers also 
being installed are Paul Hussey, 
vice president; Robert Mitchell, 
treasurer; Ann Cosgrove, 
recording secretary; and Diane 
Rochelle, corresponding 
secretary. 



Directors are Henry Breen, 
Edward Flavin, James lorio, 
Robert McLaih, Bernard 
Coleman, Marilyn Flynn, Robert 
Mafera, Geraldine Pleshaw and 
Henfy Previte. 

Committee chairmen for the 
coming year are Arsene 
Tutunjian, hospitality; Gail 
Coleran, publicity; Bernard 
Coleman, Fourth of July; Paul 
Hussey, family clambake; 
Geraldine Pleshaw, Easter egg 
hunt; James lorio, beach tags; 



and Sy Tutunjian and Dick 
Blake, beach. 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Flynn are 
co-chairmen of the installation 
meeting and dance. 1 

The new officers were 
introduced to the membership at 
the association's monthly 
meeting last Thursday at Our 
Lady of Good Counsel Church 
hall. 

The association went on 
record as "vehemently opposed" 
to 100 per cent revaluation and 



announced plans for a 
house-to-house drive for 
signatures on a petition in 
opposition to the proposal. 

The meeting heard a letter 
from Ward 1 Councillor Edward 
Graham read requesting that it 
join other city groups in 
opposing revaluation. 

The association also heard a 
report from Senator Arthur 
Tobin [D-Quincy] on the status 
of a much-requested study of 
traffic in the Merrymount 



neighborhoods. Tobin said his 
office is giving the matter top 
priority. 

Rep. Tom B rownell 
(D-Quincy] discussed his efforts 
in behalf of the repair and 
replacement of worn-out water 
pipes in the section, the removal 
of broken, uncovered pipes on 
Chickatabot Beach and rats in 
the swamp. 

The group also approved a 
donation to Our Lady of Good 
Counsel Church in appreciation 
for the use of the hall. 



Quincy Elks To Observe Past Exalted Rulers Day Feb. 25 



George R. Alcott, president 
of the Past Exalted Rulers 
Association of Quincy Elks 
Lodge, announces the lodge's 
annual Past Exalted Rulers' Day 
will be held on Sunday, Feb. 25, 
at 2 p.m., in the Quincy Elks 
Home, 1220 Hancock St., 
Quincy Center. 

Leading the activities for the 
day will be the initiation of a 
group of candidates as members 
of the lodge. The initiation 
ceremony win be conducted by 
a team of past exalted rulers, 
headed by Joseph E. Brett as 
acting Exalted Ruler for the day. 

Other past exalted rulers 
serving as officers for the day 
will be: 

William J. Whelan, leading 
knight; G. Ralph DiBona, loyal 
knight; Richard J. McCormick, 
lecturing knight; Ellis L. Hughes, 
esquire, George C. Fay, inner 
guard; and Samuel G. Craig, 
chaplain. 

Also serving will be Anthony 
M. Cardarell, secretary; Thomas 
M. Garrity, treasurer; and John 
Simmons, organist. Acting as 
trustees for the day will be, in 
order of seniority, Edward C. 
McCusker, W. Henry Donaher, 
T. Russell Hally, William J. 
Woods, Larry Antonelli, Francis 

E. Cole, Edward T. Lewis, 
George W. Clark, Leonard M. 
Foley, Paul M. O'Shea, Patrick 

F. Fitzgerald, Claude M. McKee, 
Robert W. Densmore, and 
Thomas V. Morrissey, Jr., all 
past exalted rulers of the Quincy 
Lodge. 

Another feature of the day 
will be the presentation of the 
lodge's annual "Elk of the Year" 
award to a member who has 
performed meritorious and 
outstanding services to the lodge 
and its members over a period of 
yea/s. The selection of the "Elk 
of the Year" is made by the Past 
Exalted Rulers Association and 
is formally announced on that 
day. 

A social hour and catered 
roast beef dinner will top off the 
activities of the day. 



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4 



Bostongas 



Page 10 Quincy Sun Thursday, February 8, 1973 



North Quincy High School NEWS 



Written by staff members of The North Star and other North students 



'The Amnesty Question 9 

By jim McCarthy 

Now that there is peace in Southeast Asia [more or less] , a 
subject long in controversy has suddenly become a reality, pending 
immediate consideration. 

Should we grant amnesty to those who have evaded the draft due 
to strong moral conviction? After careful, extensive consideration 
from all sides of this issue, 1 conclude that I must agree with Senator 
Kennedy's belief in non-conditional amnesty. 

It seems to be that the actual issue in question, is should we 
punish anyone in any way for standing up for what they believe? 
After all, such an act would serve to stifle the very principles on 
which this nation was built. Besides, by temporarily moving to 
Canada, to immunize themselves from United States' laws, these 
draft evaders have stood by their moral convictions without causing 
any harm to anyone and without making any real trouble for the 
"system". They've taken a peaceful alternative to conceding their 
beliefs, so I fail to see how they've wronged and deserve punishment. 
Certainly our founding fathers took far more violent action 
against the "evil" which they opposed. Perhaps it's that the beliefs 
of the draft evaders are wrong; but 1 refuse to acknowledge that 
anyone has the right to decide that. 

It's been suggested and contended by many that the harm lies in 
the inequity of the matter. These people feel that it is unfair to 
those who have made the sacrifice and served in the military, to 
allow exemption of obligation to a few who have refused to make 
this sacrifice. These people who feel that way fail to realize however, 
that others have avoided the armed forces for reasons such as college 
or job obligations, and nor have they made the sacrifice which the 
veterans chose to make. 

Should we also hold them responsible to this supposed obligation 
which they have not fulfilled? Fairness must be applied to all if it's 
applied to any; otherwise, the rationality is blatently contradicted. 
Besides, let us consider for a moment which is the more noble, to 
begin with. To avoid the military because you happen to be wealthy 
enough to afford college, or because you truly believe that one can 
never be justified in killing a fellow human being, and that filing as a 
conscientous objector is a non acceptable compromise of your 
values? The latter requires considerably more courage and in a way, 
sacrifice; the kind of courage of conviction our fore fathers seemed 
to possess. 

Though none of us have any authority whatsoever to judge or 
pass sentence upon an individual strictly for their belief, man has 
always seemed to exercise the privilege throughout the ages. If I 
may, I wish to conclude this article with an analogy which I feel 

applies. 

There was once a renowned philosopher and teacher, who was of 
peasant birth, whose teachings and beliefs were in extreme 
opposition to those of the existing government. Regardless, he 
peacefully traveled about, telling the people of a better life. His 
teachings were not of revolution, or doing any sort of harm; in fact, 
they were quite the contrary. Despite this fact however, the 
government still resented him and he was convicted of no more than 
teaching the peculiar philosophy of love and peace. 

Perhaps you're one of those who believe that his defiance of the 
law and authority, no matter how peaceful it was, can justify his 
being hung on a cross. In a manner of speaking we still seem to feel 
justified in giving people their cross to bear, even today. 



'Disease 9 Spreading 

Proposed New High School Touches 
Off Epidemic Of 'Tightwaditis' 



By PAUL GOSLIN 

There are a myriad of diseases 
from common childhood 
maladies to rare curses. 

Great biologists have spent 
years isolating these diseases and 
finding cures for them. Any 
lucky and skillful biologist has a 
chance to win a Nobel Prize and 
a lot of money. 

Not to say that these 

dedicated men are mercenary 

but a little dough can be of great 

help to a starving lab specialist. 

Most of the great comedians 

campaign to wipe out these 

diseases. They hold telethons 

during which anyone who is 

important to show business 

comes on and asks for money to 

aid research on the disease. This 

is gratifying to their hearts and 

also helpful to their ratings 

which usually jump 10 points 

after one of these appearances. 

All those affectionate disease 

fans have a way of thanking the 

stars. 

I would like to campaign for 
one obscure and oft-ignored 
disease. That is "TIGHTWAD- 
ITIS!" 

It seems that Tightwaditis, or 
T.W.S., has been spreading fast 
in Quincy. It is characterized by 
a severe aversion to spending 
money on important projects 
such as the new North Quincy 
High School, a callous ignorance 
of pressing needs particularly the 
space needs at North, and an 
apathetic attitude toward any 
initiative action to relieve the 
problems. 

T.W.S. has reached epidemic 
proportions within the Quincy 
City Council. 

Biologists and chemists are 
beginning to theorize where it 
comes from. They have found 
that most of those afflicted with 
the disease live outside the 
North Quincy area, although 
there has been one exception. 
The exception is a certain Ward 
5 councillor who exhibited 
symptoms of the disease while 



Have You Heard?' 



j ■$&* 



RHONDA RANDALL of 
Quincy has been accepted to 
Northeastern University. She 
plans to major in Social Work 
and Spanish. She has been active 
on the staff of the North Star, 
the Girls' Glee Club, the Concert 
choir and the Orchestra. 



ELAINE VEASEY, a senior at. 
North, has been accepted to, 
Newton-Wellesley Hospital, 
Mount Auburn Hospital, 
Northeaste rn University and 
the University of Mass. at 
Amherst. She will probably, 
attend U. Mass. 



commenting to a local 
newspaper. He displayed 
extremely tight fists toward the 
new N.Q.H.S. which led doctors 
to believe that he had been 
affected. 

Blood tests run on sufferers 
of T.W.S. have shown great 
amounts of Quincy Taxpayers' 
Revolt rhetoric in the blood. 
Since the findings are common 
to all those afflicted the doctors 
have theorized that the rhetoric 
is part of a bacteria causing the 
disease. 

Specific symptoms other than 
those directed at the new school 
are hard to pinpoint. Sick 
councillors don't appear much 
different than normal. They still 



exhibit signs of excessive 
cheapness which is common to 
them whether or not they are ill. 
They use common 
characteristic language such as 
"austerity programs, full 
assessments" and the like. These 
are not much different than 
normal. The one distinctive 
symptom is that the councillors 
become violent at the mention 
of a new North Quincy High 
'School. 

If one even mentions the new 
school the councillors will 
become very defensive and then 
launch into lengthy explanations 
of budgets and priorities and 
why they are an excuse for 
putting off a new school. 

[Cont'd on Page 1 1 ] 



This Page Is A New Feature For Quincy Sun Readers. 
Articles Are Written by North Quincy Students and Quincy High 
Students On Alternating Weeks 







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Exchange Student From p£™""" 
Brazil Finds Pace In 
U.S. 'Much Faster' 



Thursday , February 8, 1973 Quihcy Sun Page 1 1 



WOLLASTON 



By MARY BUCKLEY 

In past years it has been 
customary for North Quincy 
High School to participate in a 
student exchange program. The 
1972-73 school year is no 
exception. 

There are two foreign 
exchange students at North this 
year; one male and -one female. 

Lucia Muniz de Souza is a 
16-year-old from Sao Paulo, 
Brazil. She came to the United 
States by way of the 
International Fellowship 
Exchange Irogram. The 
Fellowship Program asks 
different countries to send 
names of worthy foreign 
students to New York, where 
they are distributed to schools 
throughout the country. 

The first step that schools 
then must take is to find a home 
where the student will be 
welcome. Lucia has found such a 
place in the home of Mr. and 
Mrs. Robert Bylaska of 8 Berlin 
St., Wollaston. The Bylaska 
family also housed an exchange 
student from Columbia last year. 

Since arriving in Quincy Dec. 
19, Lucia has progressed well in 
her studies as a 12th grader at 
North. She speaks French and 
Spanish, and fluent English, as 
well as her native Portugese. 

Her course of studies at 
North includes Legal Education, 




LUCIA MUNIZ de SOUZA 

College Math IV, French IV, 
English, and Anthropology. 
When asked her general opinion 
of Americans, Lucia said that we 
move much faster in the United 
States. We are always in a hurry 
and always have someplace to go; 
and something to do. 

She enjoys attending North, 
and commented that school life 
is much stricter in Brazil. Lucia 
also stated that teachers here do 
not treat students as their 
inferiors as they do in Brazil. 

Lucia will graduate with the 
senior class in Veteran's 
Memorial Stadium in June, and 
will then return to Brazil, where 
she has yet to complete one 
more year of study. 



Anthropology Selected By 
Over 50% Of Students 



By JACKIE BANGS 

In 1967, with the 
cooperation of the 
Anthropology Curriculum Study 
Project, North Quincy High first 
offered Anthropology as one of 
its senior electives. 

In the following years to 
date, more than 50% of the 
seniors at NQH have elected this 
course. North Quincy High is 
one of the few high schools in 
the state and across the country 
that offers Anthropology. 

The goal of this course is to 
help the student gain deeper 
understanding of himself, of his 
own human nature, thereby 
enabling him to relate with 
comfort and hopefully a degree 
of empathy to a heterogeneous 
nation and world. An 
understanding of one's self is 
certainly a prerequisite to 
understanding others. 

The course is unique in that it 
is presented from 
interdisciplinary points of view. 
The study of man involves both 
cultural and physical aspects and 
the students who elect this 
course study each aspect for half 
the year. 

Under the instruction of 
Marjorie Bollen, a science 
t eacher, students explore the 
physical aspects of 
Anthropology, evolution, 
genetics and human variation. 



Bernard LaCourture, social 
studies teacher, instructs 
students to the cultural aspects, 
Archeology, linguistics and the 
development of culture. 

Once a week, however, the 
classes are brought together to 
intergrate the two aspects. The 
material is presented in a variety 
of ways. Films, guest-speakers, 
bone-labs, group discussion and 
field trips form an integral part 
of the course. 

The course also includes a 
three-day live-in at Plymouth 
Plantation for those brave 
students who agree to simulate 
Pilgrim life under primitive 
conditions. Have you ever tried 
to wash dishes with sand or 
ground corn for your supper? 

The success of this course is 
evident in the steady enrollment 
of the NQH seniors, yet there 
can be individual success within 
the larger one. 

By looking out at the life of 
people, familiar or strange, a 
student can come to sense his 
own uniqueness and by looking 
"outward" the student is better 
able to see "within". 



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All Church Committees To Meet At 
Wollaston Congregational Feb. 13 



Recently installed officers of 
Wollaston Congregational 
Church will hold their first All 
Church Committees meeting 
Feb. 1 at 7:30 p.m. 

Special commendation was 
made to retiring officers for 
their "sterling efforts" of the 
past year as portfolios were 
turned over to the new officers 
Jan. 28. 

Rev. Lloyd F. Martin, 
minister, said the church "looks 
forward to a new year of 
opportunity". 

He noted- the past year was 
one highlighted by two major 
events: the publication of 
Edward B. Whittredge's cantata, 
"The 91st Psalm". 



Opening the church for a 
unique service to the community 
by joining forces with the 
Medfield State Hospital to 
establish the Quincy Community 
Care Center. 

The new officers of the 
church are: 

Richard S. Kelsay, Church 
School Superintendent; Miss 
Carole A. King, clerk; Donald T. 
Dixon, assistant clerk; E. 
Herbert Elliott, historian; 
William B. Riddell, Institutional 
representative, B.S.A.; Mrs. 
Rudolph Lofgren, Mrs. Charles 
A. Collins, Protestant Social 
Service Bureau. 

Robert B. Olson, collector; 



Henry W. Gray, moderator; Mrs. 
Lloyd F. Martin, Miss Deborah 
Carlson, altar committee; Miss 
Kathleen Hughes, Christian 
Education committee; Lawrence 
S. Carter, Frank C. Wiot, 
Deacons. 

Miss Rachel Allbee, Mrs. 
Ralph Brown, Mrs. Foster 
Cleveland, Mrs. Woodworth 
Jenkins, Mrs. Walter Lee, flower 
committee; Mrs. Wallis Bean, 
Miss Carolyn Gray, music 
committee; Miss Rachell Allbee, 
Mrs. William LOngridge, 
nominating committee; Mrs. 
Howard Willard, mission action 
committee; Ralph Brown, 
Charles Collins, Mrs. Richard 
Arthur L Brackett, treasurer; Hawkes, Henry Gray, trustees. 



Tightwaditis' Over N.Q. High Spreads 



(Cont'd from Page 101 

They're fever skyrockets until 
the veins pop out in their face. 
They will often continue for 
hours and hours on this subject 
with their veins flashing a deep 
blue and their eyes bulging out 
of their heads. 

But the symptoms don't only 
harm the councillors. The 
outward cheapness has stifled 
the new high school and 
indirectly affected the 
educations of 2,400 students. 
While our precious education 
and the facility which we learn 
in slowly deteriorate, the disease 
runs rampant. At this rate the 
disease will soon make it up 
there with those biggies that I 
mentioned earlier. 

Doctors think that they're on 
to a cure. Based on the idea that 
it appears to be a blood disease 
they believe that the councillors 



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need a shot in the arm. They're 
feverishly working on this as a 
long term cure. 

The experts believe that a 
concoction mixing a public 
outcry for a new high school 
along with an exhibit of what 
the realities of life are at 
N.Q.H.S. should do the trick. 

They will need hundreds of 



people to initiate the outcry. 
The School Department can 
donate the exhibit of the school 
life. 

Please, let's stop this dreaded 
disease before it does any more 
damage. Donate a demand for a 
new high school to the cause. 

Now, I wonder if Jerry Lewis 
is busy... 



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Page 12 Quincy Sun Thursday, February 8, 1973 




Federal Cutbacks 
Slow Programs 

By PUTNAM S.BORDEN 

Executive Director 
Quincy Council On Aging 



Many years ago, when you, the seniors of our community were 
young, a definition of the role which the federal government would 
play in our lives began to take shape. 

It was a definition born of a depression era necessity. It was based 
upon the inability of state and local government, private charities 
and the business community to effectively deal with the social and 
economics needs of the nation. , 

From those bitter years, the definition of the federal role evolved. 
That role was, essentially, "where great needs exist which cannot be 
satisfied at the local level, it then become the responsibility of the 
federal government to make appropriate provisions." 

It cannot be denied that the manner in which these needs were 
handled was not always the most efficient or effective. However, we 
only need think back to those years past to recognize that, despite 
the imperfections of the system, necessary services by the federal 
government were made available. 

For the elderly, it meant retirement benefits, medical assistance, 
subsidized housing, both public and private, education programs, 
recreational activities and a host of other services designed to 
provide a better life. 

1 had hoped, in this column, to outline some of the programs we 
might consider for the future - programs such as: 

Home care for the disabled which would permit the elderly to 
continue to function, with supportive service, at home. 

Expanded nutritional endeavors such as meals on wheels. 

Programs in which the senior citizens of our community might 
render valuable assistance to the educational process and others 
which, through use of federal funds, the elderly residents of Quincy 
might be returned to the mainstream of community life. I had hoped 
to, but .... 

In presenting his budget, our President, has, in essence, returned 
us to the "good old days" of 50 years ago, as regards human services. 
And, what is particularly disturbing, he has taken dead aim at 
programs designed to directly benefit the elderly. 

He has, by implication identified the senior population with the 
supposed "welfare cheats", the "looking for a handouts" and all the 
other scapegoats used to justify reducing federal involvement in 
providing financial assistance. 

Senior citizens are not cheats. They are not looking for a 
handout. They only ask for what is due a population which has 
made our country great; dignity, self respect and a decent standard 
of living. 

Now, must we stand around, wringing our hands and bemoaning 
our fate? Absolutely not! There are many in our community who 
need assistance and while we may be limited in providing for needs 
requiring financial resources, we can certainly address ourselves to 
the problems of loneliness, isolation, and lack of meaningful activity. 

We can, by volunteering time and effort, develop people programs 
which will be every bit as valuable as financial programs. 

Through more effective use of our community resources, senior 
citizens clubs, service organizations, and municipal functions such as 
the Council on Aging and the Recreation Department, we can 
identify needs and develop approaches which through minimal 
financing and maximum volunteer effort, can provide for these 
needs. 

Wollaston Golden Fellowship 
Valentine Luncheon Feb. 13 



The Wollaston Golden 
Fellowship will hold their 
Valentine luncheon Tuesday, 
Feb. 13 at noon at the Wollaston 
Methodist Church. 

Mrs. Dorothy Daley is 
chairman. Members may obtain 
information by contacting her. 



Mrs. Percy MacLean is 
president. Mrs. Elizabeth Wildes 
is vice-president, Mrs. Mildred 
Noglin, secretary and Mrs. Helen 
Story is treasurer. 

Coffee will be served by 
Armedeo Baldassari. 



Seniors Menu 



/Served at Sawyer Towers, 

Martensen St. J 

Monday, Feb. 12 - Sausage 

with mashed potatoes and 

gravy, carrots, roll-butter, 

coffee, dessert. 

Tuesday, Feb. 13 - Beef 

Turnover with potatoes and 

gravy, spinach, coffee, 

dessert. 

Wednesday, Feb. 14 - Clam 

chowder, Baked Ham 

sandwich, coffee, dessert. 

Thursday, Feb. 15 - Baked 

chicken leg with rice, green 

beans, roll-butter, coffee, 

dessert. 

Friday, Feb. 1 6 - Salmon and 

peas on toast points, coffee, 

dessert. 



ALL DINNERS 50 CENTS 

Monday, Feb. 19 - Meat loaf 
with mashed potatoes and 
gravy, s liced beets, 
roll-butter, coffee, dessert. 

Tuesday, Feb. 20 - Turkey 
pat tie, carrots, roll-butter, 
coffee, dessert. 

Wednesday, Feb. 21 - Corn 
chowder, Tuna salad 
sandwich, coffee, dessert. 
Thursday, Feb. 22 - Hot roast 
beef sandwich with gravy, 
yellow wax beans, roll-butter, 
coffee, dessert. 

Friday, Feb. 23 - Baked fish 
with whipped potatoes, green 
beans, roll-butter, coffee, 
dessert. 




NEW STATION WAGON donated by Duggan Brothers North Quincy Garage will be used to provide 
essential transportation to Quincy senior citizens who need it. Here, James F. Duggan, [right] general 
manager of Duggan Brothers, turns over keys to Putnam S. Borden, executive director Quincy Council 
on Aging as Thomas P. Fidelle, Senior Corps driver, looks on. 

[Quincy Sun Photo] 

Duggan Brothers Donate Station Wagon 
For Vital Senior Citizen Transportation 



"Transportation," says Mayor 
Walter J. Hannon, "can be a 
serious problem for many senior 
citizens." 

Those on fixed incomes, the 
ill and physically disabled and 
the many who no longer, drive 
automobiles can be faced with 
real difficulties when it becomes 
necessary to travel beyond their 
immediate neighborhoods. 

Through the courtesy of 
Duggan Brothers North Quincy 
Garage, an additional vehicle has 
been made available to the city's 



Council on Aging. 

This new Chevrolet station 
wagon will be used to broaden 
the Council's existing 
transportation program and will 
be operated by Senior Corps 
participants, themselves senior 
citizens of the community. 

With two vehicles on the 
road, the Council on Aging will 
be able to increase substantially 
its service to the elderly of the 
community who need assistance 
in getting to doctors, dentists, 
hospitals, therapy treatments, 



etc. 

It will also permit the Council 
to assist older residents who are 
eligible to participate in the 
federal surplus food 
commodities program. 

"We certainly want tolhank 
the Duggan's, Frank, Ambrose 
and Jim for their concern for 
our senior citizens," said Putnam 
S. Borden, executive director of 
the Quincy Council on Aging. 
"We know this will be 
appreciated throughout the 
city." 



No Climbing Stairs For Tax Help 



Senior Citizens will not have 
to climb the stairs at City Hall to 
get help with their taxes, 
announces Putnam S. Borden, 
executive director of the Quincy 
Council on Aging. 

Robert Daly of the Division 
of Employment Security has 
offered street floor space at 



1433 Hancock Street for use by 
the VITA [Volunteer Income 
Tax Assistance] program. 

VITA is a program sponsored 
by the federal Internal Revenue 
Service, through which 
assistance is available to senior 
citizens and low income 
residents in completing tax 



forms 1040 and 1040A. 

The hours at the new location 
will be from 2:30 to 4:30 p.m. 
each day Monday through 
Friday. Evening hours at the 
Council on Aging office, 1120 
Hancock Street, will remain the 
same, 7 to 9 p.m. 



'King and Queen Of Hearts 9 To Be Selected Feb. 16 



The selection of a "King and 
Queen of Hearts" will feature 
the third annual Hearts and 
Flowers Dinner Dance for 
Quincy Senior Citizens, Friday, 
Feb. 16 at Fore River 
Clubhouse. 

Under the direction of Mrs. 



Marion Andrews, director Senior 
Citizens Activities, the King and 
Queen will be selected from 
those attending and will receive 
special gifts. 

A social hour will be held at 
5:30 p.m. followed by a catered 
buffet dinner at 6:30 and 



dancing from 8 p.m. until 1 1 
p.m. 

Tickets may be obtained at 
the Recreation Department 
Office in the Kennedy Health 
Center or from club presidents. 

Transportation will be 
provided from the housing units. 



Douglas McDonald Installed President 
Penn 9 s Hill Senior Citizens Club 



Douglas McDonald was 
installed as president of the 
Penn's Hill Senior Citizens, at a 
meeting at the First Presbyterian 
Church, Franklin St., South 
Quincy." 

Other officers installed were: 
Mrs. Mary Glynn, vice 



president; Mrs. A. Evelyn 
MacLeod, secretary; Mrs. 
Christine Robertson, treasurer 
and David Paton, marshall. 



department 
officers. 



installed the 



Mrs. Marion 
activities director 
citizens for- the 



Andrews, 
for senior 
recreation 



Mrs. Mary McKay is chairman 
of the refreshment committee 
and Mrs. Ruby Smalley is 
chairman of the entertainment 
committee. 



South-West Quincy Seniors Whist, Coffee On Feb. 13 



The South-West Quincy 
Senior Citizens will hold a Whist 
party and coffee hour Tuesday, 



Feb. 13 at the John Hancock 

School, Gordon and Granite St. 

The coffee social will be at 



12:30 p.m. The Whist will be at 
1 p.m. 



V 



Examination Free 

60 Seniors Eligible 

To Take Part In 
'Project Bright Eyes' 



Thursday, February 8, 1973 Quincy Sun Page 13 



S.S Alcoholism Council Now 
Associated With National Unit 



Senior Citizens of Quincy are 
eligible to participate in "Project 
Bright Eyes", March 20 and 27, 
announces Putnam S. Borden, 
executive director of the Council 
on Aging. They must meet the 
following criteria: be 55 years of 
age or older, ambulatory, and 
not under the care of an eye 
doctor or eye clinic. 

Project Bright Eyes is a 
program sponsored by the 
Massachusetts Society for the 
Prevention of Blindness, in 
conjunction with University 
Hospital's Gunderson Clinic. 

Participants in this program 
will receive, at no charge, a 
complete and extensive eye 
examination from some of the 
foremost ophthalmologists in 
the Boston area. Ophthalmology 
is that branch of medical science 
dealing with 4he structure, 
functions and diseases of the 
eye. 

Arrangements have been 
made to transport, at no charge, 
a group of 30 participants from 
a central location in Quincy to 



University Hospital and return. 
The bus will leave Quincy at 
about 8:45 a.m. and return at 
approximately 1 p.m. In 
addition, sandwiches, cookies 
and coffee will be served during 
the examination. 

Mrs. Bella Krovitz of the 
Council on Aging staff has 
scheduled two dates, March 20 
and March 27. 

Applications for participation 
have been distributed through 
the Quincy Federation of Senior 
Citizens to the various Senior 
Citizen Clubs. 

They have also been sent to 
the residents of Sawyer 
Towers-Louis George, Pagnano 
Tower and Oceanview. 
Applications are also available at 
the Council on Aging office. 

As only 60 participants can 
be examined on the two dates, 
acceptance will be on a first 
come first served basis. However, 
it is possible additional dates 
may be obtained if sufficient 
interest is shown. 



The Board of Directors of the 
National Council on Alcoholism 
has accepted the application of 
the South Shore Council on 
Alcoholism as an associate 
member of the nation-wide 
organization. 

Announcement was made in 
New York by Dr. Irvin E. 
Hendryson, President of the 
National Council on Alcoholism. 

"We're delighted to receive 
associate status from the 
National Council on 
Alcoholism," commented 



William Schales, president of the 
South Shore organization. "At 
our disposal are the resources 
and assistance of the staff of the 
National Council. We are now 
better able to serve the nine 
South Shore communities in the 
areas of information, education, 
and referral services for 
alcoholics and their families." 

"Alcoholism is close to being 
the number one health problem 
in the nation with over 9 million 
of our citizens being affected by 



the disease." 

The South Shore Council on 
Alcoholism is located at 1 1 20 
Hancock St., Quincy, in the 
John F. Kennedy Health Center. 

As part of its expanding 
program, the local group has 
speakers available for area 
groups and organizations. 
Contact with the South Shore 
Council on Alcoholism may be 
made by calling 773-1380. Mrs. 
Janet Kraft of Cohasset is 
chairman of the Speakers' 
Bureau. 



Voiceprint Evidence Materials By Dist Atty. Burke 



Dist. Atty. George G. Burke 
announces that his office has 
distributed to all law 
enforcement agencies and 
prosecutors in Norfolk County 
materials for them to utilize in 
cases involving voiceprint 
evidence. 

"For the first time in the 
Commonwealth, the distribution 
of material to investigate and 
prosecute these cases has been 



made on a county-wide basis," 
Burke said. 

"It has direct application in 
cases involving any crimes 
committed by use of the 
telephone such as bomb threats, 

obscene telephone calls, 
kidnapping, extortion and 
organized crime types of cases. 
"The preparation of this 
material was done by Chief 



Daniel F. McCarthy and Sgt. 
John P. Gaudet of the Foxboro 
Police Department. They were 
assisted by Asst. Dist. Attorney 
Robert B. Russell of my office." 

"We are hopeful that the 
public is made aware of this 
additional preventative and ! 
investigative technique which 
will serve to protect their 
interests," Burke declared. 



Jeannette Appointed To Modernization Committee 



BRUSH HILL 
TRANSPORTATION CO. 



CHARTER TOURS 

All Arrangements Mode by Us 

For information call 436-4100 

L. A. Anzuoni, Pres. 



John Jeannette of Quincy has 
been appointed to the 
16-member Massachusetts 
Modernization Advisory 

Committee, which serves as a 
link between state and local 
housing groups receiving state 
funds for improvements to 



projects. 

Jeannette is vice chairman of 
the Massachusetts Association of 

Housing Authority Maintenance 
Supervisors and chief of 
maintenance engineering for the 
Boston Housing Authority. 



The committee, which 
receives no pay, meets twice 
monthly in Boston to assist local 
housing authorities and tenant 
groups on technical matters 
involving modernization and to 
see that state funds are used 
efficiently. 



- ■ 



NOTICE 

FUTURE FENN0 HOUSE RESIDENTS 

In reply to the inquiries I have received, and for the information 
of those who might think of calling to ask the Building and Con- 
struction Trades Unions, "Why is it taking such a long time to build 
the Fenno House Elderly Housing on Hancock Street in Quincy?", the 
answer is - I don't know. 

The Fenno House is being built by non-union construction workers 
from outside the area in which we have jurisdiction. I understand that 
the prevailing community wage rates were first posted, then removed, 
and now are not being paid, for this job. 

In conversations, prior to the start of construction, with the Rev. 
Frank Bauer, minister of the Lutheran Church which sponsors Fenno 
House, he informed me that a negotiated contract with another con- 
tractor (who was in contractural agreement with construction unions) 
was terminated and the job was given to the present builder (who 
was not and is not in contractural agreement with construction unions) 
because, the Rev. Bauer said, "it was at a cheaper price/ 7 This 
would seem reasonable, except that at that time it was not known 
by me that the prevailing community wage rates were not to be 
paid. In any event I hope the savings, if any, are passed on to the 
residents of Fenno House. 

Incidentally, the contractor who first negotiated the contract for 
the Fenno House and lost it to the present builder, started con- 
struction of an elderly housing complex in the same area - exact 
same type of construction with about 25% more units than Fenno 
House. This construction was started five months after Fenno House 
•started and even though ledge (rock) was encountered and had to 
be blasted, senior citizen residents have already moved into this com- 
plex and have occupied their apartments since as early as December 
1, 1972. Now I wonder, was there really a savings? Maybe the savings 
was in money, but I believe it was certainly not in the long time 
Fenno House residents have been waiting for an apartment. 

Union construction workers have been accused of many things - 
rightly or wrongly, but let not the exceptionally long tim* to con- 
struct Fenno House be one of them. 

I hope this notice is taken in the manner for which it it intended, 
which is - with malice toward none and information for all! 

Carmine D'Olimpio 

PresioW 

Quincy & South Shore 
Building & Construction 
Trades Council 

AFFILIATES 
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Health 
High-Lights 

By Jack Silverstein 



SOME GOOD NEWS TOO 



"If you are a born worrier, you 
were born at the right time", a 
cynic might say in speaking of 
modern times. But whatever 
anyone may think of world or 
economic conditions in this 
decade, it has also brought us 
some good news in the health 
front. Especially in the research 
area of preventing deadly disease. 

For example, medical research 
has paid off recently in the 
development of a drug that lowers 
fat levels in the blood of sufferers 
with coronary heart disease. 
Although the drug, clofibrate, did 
not affect the death rate from 
heart attacks, it reduced the 
non-fatal heart attack rate by 
more than two-thirds in a study 
of more than 3,000 individuals. 



According to the American Heart 
Association, there are an 
estimated one and a quarter 
million cases of heart attacks 
annually. Life insurance statistics 
indicate that heart disease is, in 
fact, the most frequent cause of 
death today. 

• • • 

This information has been 
brought to you as a public service 
by NABORHOOD PHARMACY, 
406 Hancock St, No. Quincy, 
where you can always count on 
friendly, professional service. 
Hospital equipment and supplies 
for rent or sale. Let us keep your 
prescription tax and insurance 
records. Phone: 773-6426. 



Page 14 Quincy Sun Thursday, February 8, 1973 




St. John's CYO To 

Projects At Meeting 



Miss Margaret 11. Pike, 84, 
formerly of Standish Ave., at a 
local nursing home, Jan. 24. 

Mrs. Mary A. [Sterritt] 
Legendre, 89, of 171 Sumner 
St., at the Colonial Nursing 
Home, Weymouth, Jan. 28. 

Mrs. Margaret E. (Casey/ 
Prada, 66, of Quincy, at her 
home, Jan. 29. 

Mrs. Elizabeth T. [Stroth] 
Schroth, 78, of 95 Montclair 
Ave., at Quincy City Hospital, 
Jan. 29. 

George G. Flaherty, 61, of 35 
Quadrant Circle, at Veterans 
Administration Hospital, 
Jamaica Plain, Jan. 29. 

Mrs. Josephine A. [ French J 
Wight, 86, of 14 First St., at 
Quincy City Hospital, Jan. 29. 

Mrs. Mary A. [Maherf 
Bucklev of 40 Summit Ave., at 
Quincy City Hospital, Jan. 29. 

Mrs. Anna [SvensonJ 
Bjornson, 75, of Brockton, 
formerly of Quincy, at the 
Lutheran Home, 888 North 
Main St., Brockton, Jan. 30. 

Orlando Monti, 60, of 27 
Pearl St., Maiden, formerly of 
Quincy, in New England 
Deaconess Hospital, Boston, Jan. 
30. 

William H. Rendle, 76, of 
Holly Hill, Fla., formerly of 
Quincy, at a hospital in Florida, 
Jan. 30. 

Miss Marion B. Reardon of 35 
Crescent St., at Quincy City 
Hospital, Jan. 30. 

Mrs. Mary [Tullyj Waldron, 
93, of 42 Newton Ave., at 
Quincy City Hospital, Jan. 30. 

Benedict P. Yuscavitch, 56, 
of 91 Wilson Ave., at Quincy 
City Hospital, Jan. 30. 



Miss Mary C. McKenna, 92, 
of Quincy, at Quincy City 
Hospital, Jan. 30. 



Mrs. Helen M. [ToomeyJ 
Smaha, 55, of 65 Brooks Ave., 
at her home, Jan. 30. 

Leo H. Burns, 59, of Bray 
Farm Road, South Yarmouth, 
formerly of Quincy, at the Cape 
Cod Hospital, Hyannis, Jan. 31. 



Mrs. Margaret M. {Corcoran] 
Connelly, 80, of 39 A Martensen 
St., at Quincy City Hospital, 
Jan. 31. 

George E. Deehan Sr., 63, of 
117 Mt. Vernon Road East, 
Weymouth, formerly of Quincy, 
at South Shore Hospital, Jan. 
31. 

Mrs. Margaret [Kane] Kane, 
86, of 27 Holmes St., at Quincy 
City Hospital, Jan. 31. 



Ferdinand Benedetti, 76, of 
42 A West St., at Quincy City 
Hospital, Feb. 1. 

Mrs. Josephine [LaGrecaj 
Villanti, 81, of 17 Parsons St., at 
Quincy City Hospital, Feb. 2. 



William H. Foley, 66, of 429 
Broad St., East Weymouth, 
formerly of Quincy, at South 
Shore Hospital, Feb. 1. 

Arthur L. Ceurvels, 48, of 
Quincy, at Boston City Hospital, 
Feb. 2. 



Alexander A. Robertson, 79, 
of Anaheim, Calif, formerly of 
Quincy, in an Anaheim nursing 
home, Feb. 1. 

William J. Cosgroi,e, 72, of 21 
Lunt St., on arrival at Quincy 
City Hospital, Feb. 1. 



Mrs. Louise H. [Larson] 

Gustavsen, 85, formerly of 

Germantown, at Quincy City 
Hospital, Feb. 2. 

Miss Gertrude Goldman, 64, 
of 13 Lowe St., at the Quincy 
Gty Hospital, Feb. 2. 





Quincy Memorial 

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Quality aj a low cost. 
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Joseph P. Holmes, 64, of 95 
Davis St., on arrival at Quincy 
Gty Hospital, Feb. 3. 

Lloyd Ritvo, 69, of 5 Talbot 
Road, Canton, formerly of 
Quincy, at Holy Ghost Hospital 
in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., Feb. 3. 

Ivan S. Pohlson, 87, of 27 
Delano Ave., at a local nursing 
home, Feb. 4. 

Mrs. Margaret M. [Stanton] 
Hallisey, 62, of 288 Centre St., 
unexpectedly at Quincy City 
Hospital, Feb. 4. 

Mrs. Annie H. [Hague] 
MacLeod, 89, of90BotolphSt., 
at Quincy City Hospital, Feb. 3. 

Mrs. Mik' r ed Richards [Dyer] 
Twitchell, 80, of Whitingham, 
Vt., formerly of Quincy, at the 
Brattleboro Hospital, Feb. 3. 

Miss Celina Beliveau, 85, of 
73 Martensen St., at Quincy City 
Hospital, Feb. 4. 

Patrick J. Kineavy, 
13-week-old son of Thomas F. 
and Mary Kineavy of 58 
Packard's Lane, at Floating 
Hospital, Boston, Feb. 1. 

William E. Wright, 85, 
formerly of Billings St., at a 
Quincy nursing home, Feb. 4. 

Giovanni Mazzarella, 74, of 
21 Colby Road, at an 
out-of-town hospital, Feb. 3. 

Lawrence J. Sturchio, 72, of 
690 Washington St., at the 
Veterans Administration 
Hospital, Jamaica Plain, Feb. 3. 



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St. John's CYO will hold its 
monthly meeting Sunday at 
7:15 p.m. in St. John's School 
Hall. 

Speaker will be Paul O'Brien, 
of Arlington, a student at 
Stonehill College, and a graduate 
of Boston College High School, 
where he served as vice president 
of the Student Council and 
treasurer of his class. 

At Stonehill he is also class 
treasurer and involved in the 
Grease Paint Players. Presently, 
he is directing the production of 
"Promises, Promises". 

A past president of the 
Archdiocesan CYO, he is a team 
member of the Archdiocesan 
CYO "Search for Christian 
Maturity", a weekend program 
which has served over 2,600 high 
school juniors and seniors from 
throughout the Archdiocese. 

The CYO will sponsor a 
Valentine Party Feb. 16 at 
Med field State Hospital for 
residents of the Quincy, Milton, 
Braintree Ward. 

Final payment for the Feb. 



2 1 ski trip to Mt. Agamenticu in 
Maine must be made at Sunday's 
meeting. 

The CYO production of "The 
Wayward Clocks" was presented 
to St. John's School student 
body and the children of the 
parish. Arrangements are being 
made for its presentation at 
Children's wards in various 
hospitals. 

Work has began on the CYO 
annual variety show, "On Stage 
III". Michelle Cheney will be 
director, assisted by Debby 
D'Olimpio and Laurie DeCoste. 
They request CYO members to 
submit skits to them as soon as 
possible. 

A large group of freshmen 
and sophomores from the CYO 
will attend an "Overnight" at 
CYO headquarters Feb. 17-18. 

At the meeting more 
information will be given on 
upcoming events such as the trip 
to see "No, No, Nannette", a 
dance; and the Valentine project 
for the elderly and shut-ins. 



Beth Israel Brotherhood 
To Honor Ernest Montilio 



The Brotherhood of Beth 
Israel Synagogue will honor 
Ernest J. Montilio at its annual 
brotherhood breakfast, Sunday 
morning, Feb. 18, at Beth Israel 
Synagogue, 33 Grafton St., 
Quincy Point. 

Rabbi Jacob Mann will 
conduct the religious services at 
8:30 a.m. and will later serve as 
master of ceremonies and 
present the plaque to Montilio. 

For more than 25 years, the 
Brotherhood has been the 
sponsor of these inter-commun- 
ity, interfaith services. Many 
important civic leaders and 
notables have been cited and 



honored during the course of 
years. 

Montilio will be cited for "his 
outstanding achievements in the 
interest of community relations, 
for the p romoting of 
understanding amongst all 
people of all faiths". He will 
receive the citation of honor for 
the year of peace, 1973 - 5733. 

Guest speaker will be 
Congressman James A. Burke of 
Milton. 

Morton Arons is Brotherhood 
President, Jack Klaver, 
Synagogue President and Irving 
Isaacson, publicity chairman. 



Roger Forbush, Jr. To Speak 
'At Golden Rule Bible Class 



Roger Forbush Jr., will be the 
speaker at the Golden Rule Bible 
Class Sunday at 9:15 a.m. at the 
Senior Citizens Drop-In Center, 
24 High School Ave. 

Music will be by Prof. Norma 
MacLeod and Florence Hardy 
Lund in, accompanied at the 
piano by Mrs. Anna Hemeon. 
Edward Kelliher will play hymns 



on his guitar and harmonize. 

Mrs. {Catherine Rose will be 
hostess. Oliver F. Tatro Jr. will 
direct the class. Everyone is 
welcome to attend. 

Oliver F. Tatro Jr. has been 
appointed the new director of 
the class, succeeding the late Dr. 
Carl H. Leander, founder and 
long-time leader of the Bible 
Class. 



Five St. John's Students 
Accepted At B.C. High 



Five students at St. John's 
School, Quincy, have been 
accepted at Boston College High 
School. 

The five are : 

Brian Pforr, Gerard Daley, 



Thomas Shea, Brian Reidy and 
Paul Genereux. 

Their academic performance 
on two competitive exams 
determined their acceptance. 



Urges March Of Dimes 
Assignments Be Completed 



Mrs. Kenneth B. Hammerle 
announces that although many 
marchers have completed their 
assignments, there are still a few 
to be finished and returned to 
the respective captains or to the 
Hancock Bank & Trust Co., 
1495 Hancock St., Quincy. 



Wickens and Troupe 



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She urged all those that have 
yet to march to do so 
immediately. 

Mrs. Hammerle stressed the 
importance of having each 
person in the town contacted for 
this most worthy cause. "I 
believe that the March of Dimes 
needs all the assistance possible 
if they are to make significant 
progress in the field of birth 
defects." 

The National Foundation- 
-March of Dimes, she said, 
thanks volunteers for the 
tremendous effort shown in the 
1973 March of Dimes Mothers 
March. 



Thursday, February 8, 1973 Quincy Sun Page 15 



Paul Creedon Presented 
Monroe MacLean Award 
At Father's Club Dinner 



Paul Creedon, the 
quarterbacking son of the 
Quincy superintendent of 
schools, was presented the 
Monroe MacLean Award as the 
most valuable player on the 
Quincy High School football 
team at a recent dinner of the 
Quincy Fathers Club. 

Anthony Malvesti, president 
of the Fathers Club, made the 
presentation. 

Other awards went to: 
Edward Sylva, the Granville 
Award as the outstanding player 
in the Quincy-North Quincy 
football game, presented by Bud 
Page. 

John Whitney, the Grasso 
Award as the unsung hero, 
presented by Billy Osborne and 
Carmella Grasso. 

Roy Shea, the President 
Trophy as the most improved 
player, presented by Frank 
Osborne, Treasurer of the 
Fathers Club. 

Richard Sylva, the 
Moscardelli Award as the best 
offensive back, presented by 
Mrs. Art Burke and her son, Vin 
Moscardelli. 

Ron Smith, the Underwood 
Award as the best offensive 
lineman, presented by George 
Underwood. — 

John Ford, the Primavera 
Award as the best defensive 
back, presented by Mrs. Paul 
Primavera. 

The Coach Henry Conroy 
Awards, consisting of footballs 
from winning games, went to 
Robert Splaine, Vin Picardi, 
Frank Guido and Bob Megnia. 

• In Track 





MVP AND FRIENDS - Paul Creedon [second left] holds his most 
valuable player award as his father. School Supt. Dr. Lawrence 
Creedon [left] , his mother, Mrs. Barbara Creedon, and Coach Henry 
Conroy beam approval. 



TROPHY WINNERS at Quincy Father's Club dinner included Rick 
Silva, the Moscardelli Award; Paul Creedon, the Munroe MacLean 
Award; John Whitney, the Grasso Award; and Ron Smith, the 
Underwood Award. 





MORE TROPHY WINNERS with their trophies are John Ford, the 
Primavera Award; Edward Sylva, the Granville Award; and Roy 
Shea, the Presidents Trophy. 



GAME BALL WINNERS are Vin Picardi 
and Frank Guido. 



Bob Megnia, Bob Splaine, 



North Third, Quincy Low In GBL All-League Meet 



The absence of one runner 
and the weakened condition of 
another resulted in North 
Quincy's track team suffering its 
first loss of the year in the relay 
and a third place finish in last 
week's Greater Boston League 
all-league meet. 

Bob Gentry's Raiders, league 
co-champion with Revere with a 
5-1 record, scored 31 points to 
finish behind Somerville with 34 
points and Revere with 33. 

Lee Watkins, one of the stars 
of the previously undefeated 
relay team, missed the event 
when he was injured during the 
50-yard dash. This, incidentally, 
also prevented a possible win for 
him in the dash after he had run 
away with his trial heat with a 
brilliant effort. 

Bob McCormack, another 
relay standout, was slowed down 
after a week's bout with the flu, 
although he did win his 
specialty, the 1000, 

North's winners were Jack 
Reynolds in the 300 and 
McCormack in the 1000. 

Burt Bray, with his best 



effort of the year, 45 feet, 2 
inches, led in the shot put until 
the final throw of the day when 
he was nipped by a Somerville 
entry. Steve Fransoso gave 
North a fourth in this event. 

Watkins, after his great trial 
heat, had to be satisfied with 
third place in the finals after 
injuring his foot. Mark Canavan 
placed third in the 600 and the 
relay team finished second. 

"This was the most 
evenly-matched league we were 
ever in and the competition was 
tremendous," Gentry said. "We 
really wanted to win the 
all-league meet to prove we were 
the best and I think we would 
have if Watkins wasn't injured 
and McCormack was at top 
speed." 

Gentry has entered Reynolds 



in the 300 and high jump, 
McCormack in the 1000 and 
Canavan in the 600 in this 
weekend's state trials. 

Quincy, with only a few 
entries due to injuries and 
illnesses which ruined its season, 
scored only three points in the 
all-league meet as John Johnson 
took fourth in the high jump 
and Art DiLoreto placed fifth in 
the same event. 

Johnson finished third in the 



hurdles but was missed by the 
judges. "He was in the far lane 
and they just missed seeing 
him," Coach Tom Hall said. 
"The other coaches there agreed 
he was third but there was 
nothing we could do. I felt bad 
for him." 

Due to his many sidelined 
performers, Hall has decided 
against entering anyone in the 
state trials. "We will just look 
forward to the spring now," he 
said. 

-TOM SULLIVAN 






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Page 16 Quincy Sun Thursday, February 8, 1973 

• Junior 




Atlantic-North Downs Central 



Warren Jordan, burdened 
with four early fouls, came off 
the bench to sink two quick 
baskets in the fourth period and 
send the Atlantic-North ninth 
grade basketball team on to a 
43-37 victory over Central 
Junior High last Thursday. 

Jordan and Mike Kelly each 
had 1 2 points for Atlantic-North 
which was winning its eighth 
straight game without a defeat. 
Jack Hatfield had 10 and Paul 
Kelleher seven points for 
Central. 

Atlantic-North's Tuesday 
[Jan. 30) game with Sterling 
Junior High had to be postponed 
when the Atlantic-North bus 
broke down. 

In other ninth grade action: 

Dwight Anderson and Mike 
Carloni combined to score 22 
points in leading Point Junior 
High to a 28-19 victory over 



Broad Meadows on the strength 
of a big 10-point third period. 

Anderson had 14 points and 
Carloni eight while Kevin 
Donovan was high for Broad 
Meadows with eight. 

Carloni and Anderson were 
also the big guns Thursday as 
Point whipped Sterling, 41-31, 
despite a 14 point performance 
by Sterling's James Duggan. 

Carloni had 11 points and 
Anderson 10 for Point. Eric 
Carrea and Anthony Cedrone 
each had seven for Sterling. 
On the eighth grade scene: 
Broad Meadows held Point to 
only four points in the second 
half in walking off with a 22-9 
win. Jack Uhlar had seven points 
for the winners and Peter 
DiSalvio had four for Point. 

Sterling breezed to a 25-16 
victory over Point with Arthur 
O'Connor collecting six points 



and John Sylva four. Robert 
D'Olympio had six and Ed Daley 
five points for Point. 

Central, with Danny Cuddy 
pouring in 21 points, took 
Atlantic-North right down to the 
wire before bowing, 39-36. The 
McGinley brothers were high for 
Atlantic-North, Jimmy with 15 
points and Walter with 10. 

In seventh grade games: 

Broad Meadows pummelled 
Point, 19-9 with Bud Donovan 
getting five points for the victors 
and Jimmy Perdios scoring three 
for Point. 

John Sylva got nine points as 
Sterling trounced Point, 19-8. 
Sterling has lost only one game. 

Atlantic-North took a 
low-scoring decision from 
Central, 11-9, with Bob Doyle 
getting four points for the 
winners and John Timmons 
putting in four for Central. 



Point-Webster Faculty-Students 
Score $63 For Managua Victims 



The victims of the Managua, 
Nicaragua earthquake were the 
real winners of the recent 
Student-Faculty basketball game 
played at Point Junior High 
School on Tuesday. 

The sum of $63 will be sent 
to the Nicaraguan Earthquake 
Relief Fund. The faculty 
All-Stars won 27-26. 

At the outset, the teachers 
got off to an impressive lead, led 
by Coach Frank Conroy and 
Gerard Mulvey. 

However, in the third period, 



Robert Silva and Dwight 
Anderson scored six points each 
to put the students out front by 
six points. 

Though the six minute 
periods had a wearing effect on 
the teachers, the faculty team 
prevailed. 

Cindy Tozzi and Debby 
Clarke led the girls with Judy 
Guest, Terry Greenleaf, and 
Rosemarie Pestilli to an 8-4 win 
over the Women's faculty team 
which consisted of Gisele Koch, 
Carolyn Bloomfield, Helen 



Mavreles and Jane McCarthy. 
Captain Patricia Gorman paced 
the losers. 

Men faculty players were 
Michael Hart, Gerard Mulvey, 
Lawrence Keough, Bruno Lotti, 
Frank Conroy and Robert 
Furtado. 

Student stars were Dwight 
Anderson, Michael Carloni, 
Robert Silva, Steven Infascelli, 
George Higgins, Shaun Dwyer, 
Robert Varasso and Perry 
Paolucci. 



Rep. Clifford H. Marshall 
[D-Quincyl announces the 
House of Representatives has 
passed a bill filed by Quincy 
legislators authorizing the Board 
of Regional Community Colleges 
to grant an easement to the 
QuincyYouth Hockey Association 



LEARN HOCKEY 

Baginnars program for boy* • to 
12, Sunday mornings 10 wttki 
starting March 1 1 at Now Boston 
Harbor Marina Rink. Limited 
ciassos. loam from Bruins Captin 
Don McKonnoy, a votoran of 13 
NHL Maseru, plus loading school 
boy coachoi. 

Write or Call 696-1954 

South Shoro Boginnor* Hoc* 

koy Program, 1 08 Church St.. 

Milton Man. 



Inc. to provide an access way to 
their new skating facility under 
construction behind Dutton's 
Restaurant. 

There was no opposition. The 
bill will now go to the Senate 
where it is expected to pass with 
no opposition. 

Marshall has asked Senate 
Counsel James R. Mclntyre, and 




Senator Arthur H. Tobin to have 
the Senate attach an emergency, 
preamble to the bill. This would 
mean that when it comes back 
to the House and Senate for 
enactment, the bill will become 
law as soon as the Governor 
signs it in lieu of waiting the 
normal 90-day period. 

The Board of Regional 
Community Colleges supported 
this legislation. 



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